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Author Topic: Article on Protein in Baked Goods  (Read 957 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Article on Protein in Baked Goods
« on: September 21, 2016, 10:33:43 AM »
For a comprehensive article on the role of proteins in baked goods, and also the effects of other ingredients added to a basic formulation, see http://www.bakingbusiness.com/Features/Formulations/2016/9/Problems-with-protein.aspx?e=

Peter

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Article on Protein in Baked Goods
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2016, 02:54:53 PM »
Peter;
This is a very good article but readers must remember that the thrust of the article is on protein supplementation of wheat flour based doughs where we are typically trying to supplement with 30% or more additional protein. Back in the mid 1970's I did a huge amount of research on protein supplementation and one thing that we found was that as mentioned the added protein, in many cases, would interfere with the development of the gluten film or at least the integrity of the gluten film. What we found that worked very well was to find out how much additional water would be needed to hydrate the added protein, then make a dough with that level of absorption (but without the added protein) the dough would be mixed to full or nearly full gluten development and the protein would then be added to the dough allowing the added protein material to be "tacked onto the existing gluten film". This was confirmed through the use of micro-photographs. The process worked very well in that it allowed for the addition of up to 35% addition of non-gluten forming protein to the dough BUT all good things have a price and the price in this case was that we could not add much more than about 35% added protein, if we did the absorption increase was sufficient to interfere with the development of the gluten film prior to the addition of the protein. It was about this same time that we took a play from the play book of the old bakers and started using soakers to pre-hydrate the added protein material prior to addition to the dough, this same approach was used when we developed methods for adding huge amounts of fiber material to the doughs when high fiber was all the rage.
Pretty neat stuff!
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Article on Protein in Baked Goods
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2016, 04:43:09 PM »
Tom,

I saw from the article that a lot of things could be added to a dough that might cause problems with hydration and gluten formation, such as vital wheat gluten, dairy whey, nonfat dry powder, and so on, and I wondered as I read the article whether the added ingredients could be added after mixing the basic dough, much as you explained. I was also aware that dry ingredients such as those mentioned above had to be accounted for in the total hydration since they would also be hydrated. Those are the points that I wanted our members to be aware of and was one of the reasons I cited the article. Your post drives home those messages very well, and I thank you for elaborating further on the issues involved in modifying formulations to include more protein or anything else and how to get around the problems that one might encounter.

Peter

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Article on Protein in Baked Goods
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2016, 12:50:01 PM »
Peter;
Protein has been a topic for some time now but when the schools came out with their new nutrition guidelines and pizzerias were approved to provide pizza to schools it became a hot topic. How to get all that protein into the dough????? Trust me, it couldn't be done! We ended up using protein as a stabilizer in the pizza sauce.....worked like a champ! In that application you need to select the protein very carefully as it must not create grittiness, and more importantly interfere with the flavor of the sauce, for this reason protein concentrates and isolates are commonly used (the purer the protein the less it resembles the parent grain), by this I mean that soy flour has a "funky" flavor, much like silage , but defatted soy flour (think of it as purified soy flour/most of the fat removed) has a much more tolerable taste, then when you further purify the protein to a concentrate (90% protein)it is for all purposes flavorless and when you take it to an isolate 95%+ protein content we are looking at near 100% pure protein that has no resemblance to its parent....soy flour.
On a different topic, would you please send me your e-mail address.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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