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Author Topic: % yeast in Neapolitan pizza  (Read 1391 times)

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Offline londonbeetle

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% yeast in Neapolitan pizza
« on: October 20, 2017, 09:55:18 AM »
Hello , I read on the tom lehmann calculator that we are supposed to use 0.5-1.5 % fresh yeast however does that percentage change when using 12kg flour?

Offline PolishPizzaBoy

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Re: % yeast in Neapolitan pizza
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2017, 10:40:41 AM »
Nope, it'll be a lot more but it'll be the same percentage you use when making smaller batches.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: % yeast in Neapolitan pizza
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2017, 10:44:12 AM »
Hello , I read on the tom lehmann calculator that we are supposed to use 0.5-1.5 % fresh yeast however does that percentage change when using 12kg flour?
londonbeetle,

I would say no but several years ago I saw pizza dough formulations in a document from Pendleton Mills (now Grain Craft) where the amount of yeast did not scale up linearly with the amount of flour. I discussed this observation at Reply 3 at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=909.msg8210#msg8210.

I suppose that it was also possible that the yeast quantities were selected to be round numbers, for ease of use.

The document referenced above is no longer available at the Grain Craft website but I found it in the archives of the Wayback Machine, at:

https://web.archive.org/web/20141109232607/http://www.pfmills.com/filebin/pdf/technical_informational_booklet_v1-opt.pdf (see page 12).

The above example is the only one that I can recall where the baker's percents changed with flour quantity.

Peter

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: % yeast in Neapolitan pizza
« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2017, 10:55:50 AM »
Your workflow is going to be a factor. If you do a bulk ferment stage, the "mass effect" may necessitate decreasing yeast % as the batch size increases. If you go straight to balls, the yeast % may be independent of batch size. Other elements of your workflow will also have an impact. The only way to know is to test, tweak, and repeat until you get it how you want it.
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Offline rdbedwards

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Re: % yeast in Neapolitan pizza
« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2017, 03:04:05 PM »
Speaking of the mass effect, at what batch size do you think this effect occurs?  I was making dough in smaller batches (440-660 grams for 2 or 3 dough balls), but recently switched up to 5 balls (1100 grams), and noticed an improvement in the pizzas.  Do you think the mass effect could have made a difference, or was it more likely temperature and yeast percentage (the improvements were stronger dough yet still extensible and greater oven spring).

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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: % yeast in Neapolitan pizza
« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2017, 03:16:38 PM »
I don't know but I'd be surprised if you see much mass effect at 1100g dough.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: % yeast in Neapolitan pizza
« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2017, 03:18:59 PM »
Speaking of the mass effect, at what batch size do you think this effect occurs?  I was making dough in smaller batches (440-660 grams for 2 or 3 dough balls), but recently switched up to 5 balls (1100 grams), and noticed an improvement in the pizzas.  Do you think the mass effect could have made a difference, or was it more likely temperature and yeast percentage (the improvements were stronger dough yet still extensible and greater oven spring).
rdedwards,

I'm inclined to agree with Craig. However, you may want to check out the following document that discusses the mass effect at page 5:

http://www.sfbi.com/pdfs/NewsF04a.pdf

Peter

Offline rdbedwards

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Re: % yeast in Neapolitan pizza
« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2017, 03:52:55 PM »
According to that article, a greater mass of dough will increase in strength more quickly than a smaller one.  So, even though 1100g is still a relatively small amount, it is about double what I was making before, so it makes sense that a larger mass would be stronger, due at least in part to the mass effect.  I also kept the dough longer in bulk and shorter in balls, which would also develop more strength.  Interesting!

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: % yeast in Neapolitan pizza
« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2017, 04:55:33 PM »
Maybe, maybe not. There are so many other potential contributing factors that you can't simply jump to the conclusion that going from 2-3 to 5 balls, in and of itself, improved the dough. Even if it did, my guess is it had more to do with better mixing than the mass effect.  Doing some side-by-side tests would be a good way to move in the direction of confirming hour hypothesis though.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: % yeast in Neapolitan pizza
« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2017, 06:38:08 PM »
Actually, the entire article iI cited is about dough strength, where dough strength is defined as a balance between elasticity, extensibility and tenacity. However, as applied to pizza dough rather than bread dough, I would say that elasticity and extensibility apply more closely to pizza dough, which is formed into skins, than to bread dough where tenacity can be a factor when forming and shaping the dough into elongated loaves. The article also discusses tha factors that go into dough strength. And, as Craig mentioned, the mass effect is just one factor. The mass effect may still be there but it is hard to quantify. That is where experimentation and testing come into play. It also makes for a good learning experience.

Peter

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