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Author Topic: a bit too much oven spring  (Read 718 times)

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Offline Chet

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a bit too much oven spring
« on: January 29, 2018, 10:01:31 AM »
 i made a sicillian dough yesterday, 3 cups flour, 1 1/4 cup 90 deg water, 2 1/4tsp ADY in the warm water 5 min, 1 tbl olive oil, 1 tsp salt,
1 tbl sugar, 1 tbl powdered milk. set in 40deg fro 6 hrs then room temp for 1hr dough ball weighs 22oz for the standard size pizza pan, baked at 470deg, dough was good but just a little too thick when it came out of the oven, what would make a thinner crust after i make this recipe again, possibly reduce the percentage of ADY or try a 20oz doughball

   thanks
 Chet
« Last Edit: January 29, 2018, 10:03:25 AM by Chet »

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: a bit too much oven spring
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2018, 11:08:49 AM »
Chet;
Do you have a specific reason for using all of your dough water at 90F? Depending upon your dough mixing method this is probably giving you a finished dough temperature which is above the recommended 80 to 85F maximum.  A high dough temperature might be resulting in too much fermentation for what you are trying to achieve. I would suggest using only 1/4-cup of water at 100F to hydrate/activate the ADY in with the remainder of the water at 70F which should give you a more controlled finished dough temperature. Do you know what your finished (mixed) dough temperature presently is? The other thing to consider is reducing the amount of dough for your pan size (12-inch?). I'd reduce it by 2-ounces and see where that brings you out at, then adjust from there if necessary. Another possible action is to adjust the amount of time you're allowing the dough to proof in the pan prior to dressing and baking. In this case reduce the time by 10-minutes and bench mark from there.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Chet

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Re: a bit too much oven spring
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2018, 01:04:43 PM »
 Tom

thanks for the prompt reply, i will try the 1/4 cup of water method, i did not check the dough temp after i mixed the dough, will do that and try a 20oz dough ball. my pan is probably more like 12 or 13 x 17

 thanks
 Chet

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: a bit too much oven spring
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2018, 01:46:59 PM »
Chet,

You did not indicate what type or brand of flour you are using but at three cups of a basically generic flour with 2 1/4 teaspoons of ADY, which is a full packet, comes to over 2% ADY. That strikes me as being too high, even for a Sicilian style dough.

Peter

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: a bit too much oven spring
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2018, 03:31:31 PM »
Good point Peter. A good starting point for ADY is 0.5% to 0.7% in deep-dish/thick crust pizzas. So that puts 2% way over the top.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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Offline Chet

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Re: a bit too much oven spring
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2018, 07:11:30 PM »
 Tom & Peter

 my fault, i meant to add the info, but mind slipped, it was King Arthur bread flour.

chet

Offline Chet

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Re: a bit too much oven spring
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2018, 07:16:44 PM »
 with 3 cups of flour and 1 1/4 water what would the percentage form look like what ratio would this be,

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: a bit too much oven spring
« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2018, 08:07:03 PM »
with 3 cups of flour and 1 1/4 water what would the percentage form look like what ratio would this be,
Chet,

The answer depends on how you measure out the flour and water volumetrically. However, if you go to the Mass-Volume Conversion Calculator, at https://www.pizzamaking.com/FoodSim.htm, you can select different ways of measuring out the KABF (which is in the pulldown menu) and do the calculation yourself. You can also get the weight of 1 1/4 cups of water. As an example, if you use the Medium Measurement Method for the KABF, then three cups of KABF measured out as described gives us a weight of 14.838 ounces. Using the same calculator for the water, 1 1/4 cups weighs 10.438 ounces. That may be a bit high because most people tend not to be careful in how they measure out water in, say, a glass Pyrex measuring cup. They just eyeball it, and usually from above. Technically, one should fill the measuring cup to the appropriate line marks and view the level of the water (the lower meniscus) at eye level with the measuring cup on a flat surface. Now you can see why we prefer weights over volumes :-D.

For the above example, the hydration is 10.432/14.838 = 70.31%. Actually, the dough may seem a bit wetter than that because you are also using 1 tablespoon of olive oil, which also has a "wetting" effect on the dough even if it does not hydrate the flour. According to the Calculator, 1 tablespoon of olive oil weighs 0.474 ounces, or about 3.2% of the flour weight in my example. If you add that to 70.31%, we get 73.51%, which means the dough will feel even wetter.

You should feel free to use the Calculator with your own numbers. If you do, let us know what you get. FYI, the Calculator was the brainchild of member November. However, I helped him with a lot of the numbers because I took several hundreds of weighings of different flours measured out using the different flour Measurement Methods. But, even then, absolute precision is an iffy proposition.

Peter

Offline Chet

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Re: a bit too much oven spring
« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2018, 11:05:40 AM »
Hi Peter

   i appreciate a well in depth reply, as always from you & Tom, going to make that recipe later today and get my scale out and make use of the calculator

 Chet
 

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