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Author Topic: How to check the moisture content in your firewood?  (Read 201 times)

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Offline MyOrangeWay

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How to check the moisture content in your firewood?
« on: February 17, 2019, 03:12:11 PM »
Why it's so important to use only well-seasoned wood in your WFO?

In the post below, you'll find the answer to this question. Besides this, you'll get familiar with many ways of checking the moisture content in your firewood. And, youi find out the most popular wood for a pizza oven in Italy.

https://www.myorangeway.com/best-wood-for-pizza-oven/#What_Exactly_Is_Moisture_Content_in_the_Firewood

Enjoy your reading!  ;D


Offline Brent-r

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Re: How to check the moisture content in your firewood?
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2019, 05:59:54 PM »
the article is pretty well done.
the picture of the stack of wood against a wall illustrates the worst way to dry wood.
we have made maple syrup for years, heat our house with a wood stove, and pizzas too.

air flow is the major factor in drying wood.  we stack ours cross cross.  3 or 4 split pieces front to back then 3 or 4 right to left and alternate to about 4 ft high.  We make 4 stacks like this on a skid.  Split it and stack it early in the spring and stack in a area with lots of air flow and it will be great in the fall.  Pieces the size of your forearm will dry much faster than thicker pieces.  And smaller pieces give you more control over how fast and hot your oven burns. I like to let ours burn down mostly to embers and then a couple minutes before launching the pizza in, I add 2 or 3 small pieces about 1/2" to 3/4" diameter and let them catch so the flames arch over the top of the oven to cook the tops of the pies.  All this of course depends on your oven size and design.

If you want to play around, split a few pieces and weight them accurately on a kitchen scale and write the weight on each one.  Go back every month or so and check the weight.  You will see after 4 - 6 months the weight will stabilize and may even cycle back up a bit in humid weather.  Furniture makers know that wood will lose and regain moisture and expand a little and good furniture design makes allowances for that so the furniture does not stress and split ( large panels are often not glued to allow for this )

You don't need a moisture meter.  They only  check the moisture about 1/8 to 3/16" deep anyway and are intended for lumber ... not fire wood.

Its all part of the learning curve and fun.

The sound method described in the article is pretty reliable.  Knock two dried spits together and you get a high pitched clink like sound.  Wet wood sort of thuds with a low pitch sound.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2019, 06:05:02 PM by Brent-r »
Brent

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