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Author Topic: vinegar in the dough  (Read 357 times)

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Offline werty20

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vinegar in the dough
« on: February 21, 2019, 12:22:02 PM »
what is the effect of adding vinegar to pizza dough ? i know they sometimes add vinegar to cake coz it work with baking powder to rise it .. but what about pizza or yeast dough , thanks

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: vinegar in the dough
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2019, 12:48:12 PM »
Actually, vinegar isn't added to cakes to react with the baking powder, it is added to react with baking soda (big difference). Baking powder is a fully balanced leavening system, just add water and heat and it generates carbon dioxide as a leavening gas. Baking soda, on the other hand, will only make the cake more alkaline (too much will turn the fat in the cake into soap through a process called "soponification" resulting in a soapy flavor in the finished cake. When vinegar (dilute acetic acid) ai added along with the soda the two quickly react to form carbon dioxide as a leavening gas. The only reason for adding vineger or any acid to a cake batter with a fully balanced leavening system is to adjust the finished pH of the cake, making it more acid which is common in white cake and angel food cake as it produces a brighter, whiter crumb color. Soda, on the other hand is commonly added to chocolate cake as it makes the crumb darker and intensifies the chocolate flavor (dutched process cocoa is just cocoa treated with an alkali to make it darker and more flavorful).
Now to pizza dough. The reason for adding vinegar to pizza dough or any yeast leavened dough, is to acidify the dough slightly, thus helping to "jump-start" the yeast with fermentation. Since acetic acid is one of the acids formed during fermentation it will also help to lower the pH of the finished crust but not much below pH 4.2 (sourdough has a pH of 3.8 or a little lower), so its impact upon the finished flavor is marginal at best if the dough is already being properly fermented, where there is some benefit is in doughs that are fermented for only short times, in this case the lower dough pH will help to speed up the rate of fermentation and give a lower finished crust pH for a slight flavor improvement over a short time fermented dough without added vinegar. How much vinegar is added? Typically 2% of a 50-grain strength vinegar is used, be sure to remove 2% water when adding 2% vinegar.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline QwertyJuan

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Re: vinegar in the dough
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2019, 11:05:51 PM »
Actually, vinegar isn't added to cakes to react with the baking powder, it is added to react with baking soda (big difference). Baking powder is a fully balanced leavening system, just add water and heat and it generates carbon dioxide as a leavening gas. Baking soda, on the other hand, will only make the cake more alkaline (too much will turn the fat in the cake into soap through a process called "soponification" resulting in a soapy flavor in the finished cake. When vinegar (dilute acetic acid) ai added along with the soda the two quickly react to form carbon dioxide as a leavening gas. The only reason for adding vineger or any acid to a cake batter with a fully balanced leavening system is to adjust the finished pH of the cake, making it more acid which is common in white cake and angel food cake as it produces a brighter, whiter crumb color. Soda, on the other hand is commonly added to chocolate cake as it makes the crumb darker and intensifies the chocolate flavor (dutched process cocoa is just cocoa treated with an alkali to make it darker and more flavorful).
Now to pizza dough. The reason for adding vinegar to pizza dough or any yeast leavened dough, is to acidify the dough slightly, thus helping to "jump-start" the yeast with fermentation. Since acetic acid is one of the acids formed during fermentation it will also help to lower the pH of the finished crust but not much below pH 4.2 (sourdough has a pH of 3.8 or a little lower), so its impact upon the finished flavor is marginal at best if the dough is already being properly fermented, where there is some benefit is in doughs that are fermented for only short times, in this case the lower dough pH will help to speed up the rate of fermentation and give a lower finished crust pH for a slight flavor improvement over a short time fermented dough without added vinegar. How much vinegar is added? Typically 2% of a 50-grain strength vinegar is used, be sure to remove 2% water when adding 2% vinegar.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Holy Cow!  :-D

So much information here Tom... wow! If I only knew half of what you know I'd be dangerous!  :-D

Offline werty20

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Re: vinegar in the dough
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2019, 08:03:29 AM »
many thanks
Holy Cow!  :-D

So much information here Tom... wow! If I only knew half of what you know I'd be dangerous!  :-D
^^^ :-D

Offline RedSauce

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Re: vinegar in the dough
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2019, 09:02:06 PM »
And THIS is why we mere struggling mortals must fall on our knees in gratitude to the generous counsel afforded us by the Dough Doctor. Long may he reign.

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