A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: Obtaining a fluffy but crunchy crust with my lactic/acetic acid infused dough  (Read 224 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline samuelrgross

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 5
  • Location: Roseburg, OR
  • I Love Pizza!
I've had a pizzeria for 10 years now. People love the flavor of our crust as we cold ferment it and also add lactic and acetic acids, as well as malt and whey. I got the recipe from someone else. Our dough does best when we let it proof on screens for a few hours, wrapped in plastic wrap, before we sauce and cheese it. The problems with that are sometimes they'll over proof and the dough pushes through the holes in the screen giving the pizza a dimply bottom. I want to get the nice fluffy feel and height out of the dough by going directly from hand tossing or sheeting the dough to the oven. I also want the crust to be crunchy on the outside. What can I change to make that happen? Here is my recipe:

80 qt mixer
Mondako flour 11.4% to 12.4% protien
90F water temp
Mix on low for 9 minutes

Flour 100%
Water 57%
Oil 1.5%
Yeast 1%
Salt 1.5%
Sugar 2%
Malt 0.5%
Whey 0.25%
Lactic Acid 0.4%
Acetic Acid 0.3%



Offline QwertyJuan

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 407
  • I Love Pizza!
I've had a pizzeria for 10 years now. People love the flavor of our crust as we cold ferment it and also add lactic and acetic acids, as well as malt and whey. I got the recipe from someone else. Our dough does best when we let it proof on screens for a few hours, wrapped in plastic wrap, before we sauce and cheese it. The problems with that are sometimes they'll over proof and the dough pushes through the holes in the screen giving the pizza a dimply bottom. I want to get the nice fluffy feel and height out of the dough by going directly from hand tossing or sheeting the dough to the oven. I also want the crust to be crunchy on the outside. What can I change to make that happen? Here is my recipe:

80 qt mixer
Mondako flour 11.4% to 12.4% protien
90F water temp
Mix on low for 9 minutes

Flour 100%
Water 57%
Oil 1.5%
Yeast 1%
Salt 1.5%
Sugar 2%
Malt 0.5%
Whey 0.25%
Lactic Acid 0.4%
Acetic Acid 0.3%

Tom's going to want your finished dough temp... I am also guessing dough ball size and oven temp would also be VERY beneficial.

EDIT - I am guessing he's going to want to know what KIND of oven you're using... conveyor or deck oven for instance.

Offline samuelrgross

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 5
  • Location: Roseburg, OR
  • I Love Pizza!
Sure, I can add those.

Finished dough temp is low 80s.

The dough is split into three dough bags for 24 hours. Then they are balls and skinned in to 10, 18, and 25 oz balls for 10" 13" and 16" pizzas.

Cooking in a conveyor oven, 475 degrees, 4.55 minute belt time.

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 5152
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
    • Dough Doctor
Samuelgross;
What type of yeast are you using? Malt/diastatic or non-diastatic? Degree L.? Whey, bakery grade or non-bakery grade? Lactic acid, dry or liquid? Concentration? Ditto for the acetic acid. What is the pH of the dough after mixing? Are you interchangeably hand tossing and sheeting? If not which forming method do you use to open the dough balls into skins?
Normally when you proof the dough/skins on a screen the dough tends to flow into the screen openings and then expand during baking to effectively lock the dough to the pan after baking, this can be compounded when you over wrap the skins on the screen which further pushes the dough into the screen openings. One effective solution to this is to simply turn the proofed skin off of the screen on which it was proofed and onto another screen so the screen marks are now oriented to the top of the pizza where they can be covered by sauce and cheese, plus, since they are on the top they will also tend to come out or lessen during the oven spring phase of baking.
I should also point out that Mondako flour is shown to be at 12% protein content and 475F with a 4-minute and 55-second baking time seems rather low temperature and short baking time for a highly acidified dough....usually I see a temperature of 500 to 510F with a baking time of 6.5 to 6.75-minutes, but then I don't know what your top finger configuration is or how many top fingers your oven has so I can easily be wrong on that for your specific oven. In any case a pH of the dough would give the necessary direction.
I'm sure with a little work we can work this out.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


 

wordpress