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Author Topic: Large air bubbles in crust  (Read 543 times)

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Offline JBfromLI

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Large air bubbles in crust
« on: March 10, 2019, 07:00:38 PM »
Tom, I made several different pizzas tonight in my Pizza Party wood fired oven. The deck was about 800 F. 

This pizza was made with Caputo Americana, 62% hydration, 3% salt and 10% levain. I added the salt to the water, then the levain, then the flour. The dough mixed for 2 minutes in a kitchen aid, 10 minute rest, then some stretch and folds.

After mixing I did a RT (70 F) ferment for 2 hours, then bulked in the fridge for 24, then balled and did a CF in the fridge again. 3-4 hours before baking I pulled the balls from the fridge.

What are your thoughts on the large bubbles on the rim? Over fermentation? Improper mixing?

Thanks,
John

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Large air bubbles in crust
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2019, 09:38:27 PM »
Just fro the looks of it I'd say it is due to your opening technique.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline JBfromLI

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Re: Large air bubbles in crust
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2019, 07:24:02 AM »
Thanks - do you have a link or any advice on the best method?

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Large air bubbles in crust
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2019, 08:44:57 AM »
As you're opening the skin keep your fingers closer to the edge of the skin.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Yael

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Re: Large air bubbles in crust
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2019, 09:03:33 AM »
Hello,

In addition to Tom's reply, I see the bubbles are grilled so that means there have been some sauce on the rim, and as the sauce brings moisture it's possible that a small bubble becomes bigger because of that (the outer surface of the dough doesn't dry out, so the bubbles continues to inflate).

Why does this bother you by the way? To me, it's only regular bubbles, not a big deal.
“Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist” - Pablo Picasso

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Offline JBfromLI

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Re: Large air bubbles in crust
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2019, 09:47:24 AM »
Thanks for both of your replies. Both make a lot of sense. Yeal, I wasn’t too concerned about it, but when I was in Baltimore recently I ate at Paulie Gee’s and I’m trying to replicate Kelly’s look

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Large air bubbles in crust
« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2019, 10:20:21 AM »
You might also go to my web site at www.doughdoctor.com and take a look at the video on making dough that I have posted, it shows the dough ball being opened into a skin which might help.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline wiz_d_kidd

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Re: Large air bubbles in crust
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2019, 12:10:06 PM »
I had a similar problem recently, but the bubbles were not on the cornicione, they were in the middle!  One person (on this site) said it might be over fermented. Others say is was due to using cold dough.  Other than the large bubbles, I was happy with the crumb.  Any thoughts?

365 g Caputo 00 Chefs Flour (100%)
2 g IDY (0.5%)
2.4 g Disastatic malt (0.7%)
22 g Vital wheat gluten (6%)
10 g Kosher salt (2.5%)
4 g Olive oil (1%)
230 g cool water (63%)

I used 71 deg F water. The mixed dough was 77 deg F.  I let it rest for 10 min, then kneaded for 10 min. I divided into two balls and wrapped in plastic. One went into the freezer, the other into the fridge (at 36 deg F), where it stayed for about 27 hours. After that time, the dough had burst through the plastic wrap (actually tore it, not just unwrapped it). I let it sit out at room temp for 2 hours before opening, topping, and baking. The dough did feel rather cold, even after 2 hrs at RT.

Offline JBfromLI

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Re: Large air bubbles in crust
« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2019, 04:55:03 PM »
What kind of oven did you use? Do you know the surface  temperature of the stone/steel?

Offline Heikjo

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Re: Large air bubbles in crust
« Reply #9 on: March 14, 2019, 05:17:19 PM »
Just fro the looks of it I'd say it is due to your opening technique.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor
I see why you address opening technique, but what should happen to those air bubbles that become the charred bubbles? I assume the bubbles form from larger air holes that are already in the dough?

If you think those bubbles occur due to opening technique, does that mean you press out the air bubbles during that process to avoid them blowing up during bake?

I sometimes get those on my pies and for me they come from larger air bubbles already there. I always pop those visible larger bubbles on the rim to avoid that issue. A dough that's fermented quite far is more susceptible to these bubbles, but it doesn't necessarily mean it's overfermented. The window of usability of a dough is quite large.
-Heine. Mostly Neapolitan sourdough pizzas in an electric Effeuno P134H.

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Offline wiz_d_kidd

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Re: Large air bubbles in crust
« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2019, 05:13:57 PM »
What kind of oven did you use? Do you know the surface  temperature of the stone/steel?

It's baked in a home electric oven. I put a 3/8" pizza steel on the top rack, and preheat under the broiler, with the door closed, for 20-25 min, until the element turns off. The steel surface, which is only 1-1/2 inches from the element, reaches 650-675 deg F, according to my IR thermometer. I launch the pie, and it cooks in 120 seconds. The broiler element usually turns on again when I open the oven door to launch. The dough is fully cooked.  No uncooked gummy parts. I get very good oven spring. Nice spotted charring on the bottom, and a nice crumb. But darn those huge bubbles!  They've only started forming when I go for a 24 CF. I think the dough hasn't warmed enough before opening and baking.

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