Author Topic: Fried Mozzarella Cheese Cubes  (Read 408 times)

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Offline jkb

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Re: Fried Mozzarella Cheese Cubes
« Reply #25 on: January 16, 2017, 07:03:06 AM »
Norma,

Most of my interest in wine has been in the parts of the world best known for their wines. When I first moved to Texas, I drove through the state and would sometimes visit wineries that were on my way. I also did some research on the best wines in the state and would often buy the ones that had the best reputations. And, by and large, they were quite nice. I suspect I would find the same pattern with Pennsylvania wines even though, like Texas, Pennsylvania is not usually thought of for its wines. As I did with Texas wines, I would research Pennsylvania wines to find those that satisfy my particular palate. Even though I have a lot of expensive wines, that does not mean that I am committed to only those wines. I like wine in general and will drink almost anything. Most of my day to day wines are fairly low priced. I save my best to share with my son and his family and, on occasion with friends that are into wines in a serious way. 

Peter

It seems to me you're a Bordeaux guy.  I am too.  I'd also throw in a couple more B's and a C.  Burgundy, Barolo and Chateauneuf de Pape.  The thing with non-vinifera in obscure regions is it's often food friendly.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2017, 07:22:34 AM by jkb »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Fried Mozzarella Cheese Cubes
« Reply #26 on: January 16, 2017, 09:21:47 AM »
It seems to me you're a Bordeaux guy.  I am too.  I'd also throw in a couple more B's and a C.  Burgundy, Barolo and Chateauneuf de Pape.  The thing with non-vinifera in obscure regions is it's often food friendly.
jkb,

I also like those wines you mentioned. But when I became serious about wines, I had read a lot about the Bordeaux wines, and I was fortunate to become friends with a wine expert at the place where I bought my wines (sadly, he passed away about a year or so ago) who would alert me to the best wines as they became available and educate me on their merits. And a lot of my reading was from major wine publications, so naturally Bordeaux wines were featured a lot. So, I ended up buying a lot of Bordeaux wines and liking them. But I also like good California wines, as do my son and his wife. We all like the Joseph Phelps and Silver Oak (Napa) wines. They are pricey but not quite as bad if they are bought by the half- or full-case.

Since you like the Bordeaux wines, you might be interested in a study I conducted a while ago to see if the wines that I bought back in the 80s would have made a good investment, even though I did not buy them for that reason. What I did was to calculate whether the wines appreciated in value more than if I had put all of the money instead in a S&P 500 index, which contains 500 of the largest companies in the country. I took all of the costs into account, including initial purchase price of the wines, taxes, the cost of my wine storage unit and all related repairs, and estimated operating expenses over a roughly 30-year period. On the S&P index side, I treated dividends and any gains as being reinvested, and took income taxes into account. It wasn't the most elegantly conducted or rigorous mathematical analysis, but I concluded nonetheless that I would have done slightly better had I invested all of the money into the S&P 500 index. But when I carved out the Bordeaux wines, I concluded that I would have done better than the index, especially for the first growth Bordeaux that had phenomenal increases in value, in some cases, over 20-fold. Unfortunately, that strategy would not be likely to work today because the starting prices are too high, or else the S&P 500 would have to go stratospheric over the next few decades. Also, I will be pushing up daisies sometime in that window unless the scientists come up with some remarkable advancements that are life extending. So, in the meantime, I and my son and his family will continue to enjoy my stash of Bordeaux wines that are aging away in Mexico. Some of them are said to be drinkable up to the years 2035-2040. That should be more enjoyable than fondling the S&P 500 index :-D.

We are off the beaten path with this discussion, but I found it interesting how one can get down in the weeds with mozzarella curds too, just as I did with wines. But being down in the weeds has been the story of my life. Fortunately, cheeses and wine make good pairings.

Peter