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Author Topic: Precooking Bench Flour  (Read 909 times)

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Offline tinroofrusted

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Precooking Bench Flour
« on: June 23, 2016, 09:29:25 PM »
I occasionally visit a website called Chefsteps.com which has pretty good information about general cooking topics.  This week they have been doing a series of videos about making pizza at home, including some pretty good video on how to stretch out a dough ball. Unfortunately you have to sign up to see their content.  Anyway, they posted a video today with a new tip about how to make better pizza at home: pre-roast your bench or dusting flour before you use it to make pizza.  I had never heard of this before, and wondered if anyone else had.  According to the video, raw flour used to dust the dough ball while forming the pizza does not fully cook in a home oven and can lead to a raw flavor on the finished pizza.  So their solution to this problem is to bake the flour at 450F for 20 to 35 minutes in a thin layer on a baking sheet. It doesn't seem like a bad idea, and I suppose I will give it a try.  I try not to use a great deal of bench flour but of course you do get a bit of raw flour residue on the pizza. 

Here is a link to the video for those who are registered.

And here is a link to the video showing Joe Heffernan of Independent Pizzeria in Seattle.  The pizza looks very good. 

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Precooking Bench Flour
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2016, 09:48:11 PM »
When baking a pizza on a steel in my kitchen oven, what little bench flour I use never tastes "raw". In fact it can be easily burnt if the balance of heat isn't just right. I'm a charter member of ChefSteps Premium and have learned a great deal there. For example, the French macaron class made an immediate improvement in the quality of my efforts. Likewise the liquid foams and whipping siphon classes. But lately, I get the feeling they may be approaching "jump the shark" territory. The brisket that used liquid smoke was a massive waste of time and money.

Offline Minolta Rokkor

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Re: Precooking Bench Flour
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2016, 10:06:20 PM »
You could use raw Semolina or rice flour honestly.

I  mean, it's worth a try but, it seems like extra work.

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Precooking Bench Flour
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2016, 08:04:20 AM »
That is call "roux".  Add oil after roasting and use to thicken soups/stews.

Offline hotsawce

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Re: Precooking Bench Flour
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2016, 08:20:14 AM »
Toasting raw flour is unnecessary and as we all know, you want as little bench flour as possible on your pies anyway

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Offline communist

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Re: Precooking Bench Flour
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2016, 11:54:08 AM »
Isn't Wondra pre cooked?

Offline IndyRob

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Re: Precooking Bench Flour
« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2016, 06:21:05 PM »
The brisket that used liquid smoke was a massive waste of time and money.

Really?  In spite of Meathead's accolades?  I'm thinking of making this.

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Precooking Bench Flour
« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2016, 10:01:18 PM »
Really?  In spite of Meathead's accolades?  I'm thinking of making this.

One of the problems I've had with ChefSteps is that their SV cooking times and temps do not work for me - usually resulting in overcooked meat. And briskets vary greatly in terms of tough collagen content, depending on how much weight the brisket had to support (age, grade, breed, lifestyle, whether it came from the left or right side, etc.). The advantage of smoking in a pit is that you can monitor the progress and pull it when the collagen has completed its transformation into luscious gelatinous waba waba goodness. (I've had briskets go from as little as 10 hours to as long as 20 hours in the pit). Much harder to get doneness just right in a pouch - so this may be why I did not like one bit the one I made using the ChefStep recipe.
   

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