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Author Topic: To everyone who drops their dough ball in a bowl of flour, or a load of bench flour...  (Read 1476 times)

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Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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My advice is to leave the lid off for the first two hours in the fridge and then leave it on for the duration of time in the fridge. Leave the lid on during the tempering period too, failure to do so can result in a crusted dough. I say oil the top of the dough ball when you place it in the cooler as this will prevent any crusting during the "cross-stack" period (un-lidded time in the fridge). The moisture dripping in the container is due to condensation collecting on the lid due to a warm dough and a cold container so the moisture released from the dough travels upwards to the lid which is cold and causes the moisture to condense out which you see as water in the container. Aside from making for a sticky dough it can also result in wet spots in the dough where the water vaporizes during baking resulting in bubbling of the dough. Excess dusting flour adhesion can also be a problem.
The main reason for leaving the lid off though is to allow for consistent cooling of the dough ball and minimize the affects of variations in finished dough temperature on the dough fermentation rate.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline pfhlad0

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Thanks, Tom. By "tempering period," I assume you mean when I remove it from the fridge and let it come to room temperature. If I brush the top with a little oil, should i remove or reduce the oil from my recipe? It's only 1%, but I wasn't sure if adding it to the top would make it too much.

When I have big parties, fridge space is an issue. I'm wondering how to handle the first couple of hours when the containers don't have lids and therefore can't be stacked on top of each other. Maybe I'll drape a towel over them to absorb any moisture and provide a slight base for a second layer to sit on top of them. Or, maybe I'll invest in some dough boxes that I can stagger on top of each other during the first couple of hours (to allow air to get in) and then align them for the remaining time in the fridge.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2017, 02:32:12 PM by pfhlad0 »

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Don't worry about the oil, the amount you are adding to the dough balls will be but a small fraction of a percent. In your case the dough boxes make perfect sense, and your dish washer will have a new gained respect for you. Look at the WRH dough boxes at www.wrh.net. or Paul Bartley at <[email protected]> you might ask him if they have and seconds that they cal sell to you at a discount. Their seconds are only color blems. They have different colors so you can identify the day of the week dough was made. Or you can use a grease pencil to write the production date on each dough box. Be sure to get a couple of scrapers to remove the dough from the box as well as a box scraper which will greatly ease box cleaning.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline pfhlad0

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Thank you very much.

FWIW, my dishwasher began to hate me every time we had a party, so I bought disposable plastic containers for my dough balls. Yeah, a little pricey, but at the end of the night I didn't have a million things to wash. :-)

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