A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: Issues with scale  (Read 120 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Dptdpt

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 82
  • Location: Boston
  • I Love Pizza!
Issues with scale
« on: July 14, 2017, 12:10:03 AM »
Tonight I made two of my usual batches of dough, each producing 6 240 gram dough balls.  I measure everything out with digital scales - a higher capacity scale for the flour and water, and a more sensitive scale for the yeast and salt.  When I balled up the dough, I had about 80 grams of dough left in each batch.  I am very careful when I do my measurements, and it's not likely I would have screwed up the measurements in one batch, definitely not with two.  So I blamed the scale.  I went back and did repeated weighings of some of the balls, and found quite a bit of variation in what it reported.  Not good.  Then I suspected the batteries and replaced them.  Much better.

So it appears that my scale starts to become inaccurate when the batteries are low.  Is that possible - has anyone ever heard of a scale behaving like that?  If so, it's time to get a new scale.  I need a better way of knowing when the batteries need to be replaced than by having screwed up dough batches!

Offline vtsteve

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1025
  • Location: Vermont, USA
Re: Issues with scale
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2017, 12:50:29 AM »
If you know what your mixing bowl weighs with fresh batteries, that's an easy way to check at the beginning of a session.

If you decide to get a new scale, the MyWeigh KD8000 has a low-battery indicator on the display (and it's a great scale, too!).
Mine has scaled ingredients for ~4500 loaves and ~800 pizzas, and it's still going strong.   :)
« Last Edit: July 14, 2017, 12:35:50 PM by vtsteve »
In grams we trust.

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3191
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
    • Dough Doctor
Re: Issues with scale
« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2017, 01:12:59 AM »
Yes, it is pretty typical for the electronic scales (even very expensive ones) to begin to show inaccuracy when the batteries are low. Ditto on the KD-8000. I love mine!
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Dptdpt

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 82
  • Location: Boston
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Issues with scale
« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2017, 06:39:47 AM »
I looked at the KD8000, and it looks nice, but space is at a premium in my kitchen and I prefer a flat scale. If there is a flat one with a low battery warning, please let me know!

Offline vtsteve

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1025
  • Location: Vermont, USA
Re: Issues with scale
« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2017, 10:02:36 AM »
If there is a flat one with a low battery warning, please let me know!

Most scales have manuals online. I would just find one that looked good (they all use the same sensor), and see if the manual shows a low-battery indicator on the display.

In grams we trust.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline 02ebz06

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 295
  • Location: Rio Rancho, NM
Re: Issues with scale
« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2017, 10:29:08 AM »
If you know what your mixing bowl weighs with fresh batteries, that's an easy way to check at the beginning of a session.

If you decide to get a new scale, the MyWeigh KD8000 has a low-battery indicator on the display (and it's a great scale, too!).
Mine has scaled ingredients for ~4500 loaves and ~800 pizzas, and it's still going strong.   :)

I use a felt marker and put the weight of the bowl on the side.
Good to know if you forget to hit the tare button before you start adding ingredients.

I have a scale very similar to the KD000 and I bought the A/C adapter for it as well so I didn't have to use batteries.
I also bought calibration weights, which are handy to check your scales accuracy from time to time.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


 

A D V E R T I S E M E N T