Author Topic: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage  (Read 144385 times)

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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #325 on: August 28, 2016, 01:13:54 PM »
Hi All,

I am brand new to the forum and pizza making. I recently purchased a Pizza Party oven. I have made a few pizzas in my home oven using recipes by Peter Reinhardt and one I found on ChefSteps by Joe Hefferman. My 1st attempt in the Pizza Party oven was a disaster. I think I had the oven too hot. Pizza burnt in 30 seconds! :-[ Today I tried the Craig's recipe with better results however the issue I am having with all of the recipes I've made is that the dough seems to slack. When I tried to stretch the dough it practically stretched itself. I use the slap and stretch method but found it difficult because the dough had no resistance. I can't figure out if it's a hydration or fermentation issue. Any tips on troubleshooting would be greatly appreciated.

Bryan

How long was the dough in balls? If 24 hours+, try 12 hours in balls with the rest in bulk. If it's still too slack, work down the time in  balls a couple hours at a time until you find what works for you.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #326 on: August 28, 2016, 01:57:07 PM »
Iv'e been asked a couple times recently how I feed my starter, so I'll post the answer here:

Nowadays, I usually feed it about 6 hours before I use it. I keep about a pint. To feed, I add about a pint of water (50:50 starter:water) then discard half and add enough flour to make it a thick batter consistency. It would just barely pour.

It's less important precisely how you feed your culture than it is that you do it the same way every time. This will help you achieve consistent, predictable results.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline brYanC

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #327 on: August 28, 2016, 09:46:14 PM »
How long was the dough in balls? If 24 hours+, try 12 hours in balls with the rest in bulk. If it's still too slack, work down the time in  balls a couple hours at a time until you find what works for you.
Thank you. I did a bulk ferment for 24 hours @ approx 65 degrees and then balled the dough and fermented for approximately 8-9 hours. The balls were around 250 grams and were put in plastic containers. The balls were pretty flat when I took them out and definitely had some bubbles on the surface and the bottom. Next time I will try to ball later and see what happens. Thanks again.

Offline KeithGrima

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #328 on: September 07, 2016, 01:18:47 AM »
Can anyone please share how they start(from scratch) and maintain their sourdough please.

Some Questions:

1) Should sourdough ratio always be 1:1:1 (when starting) or is this only for feeding
2) Should the flour for sourdough match the one used to make pizza dough
3) What Flour do you suggest for sourdough
« Last Edit: September 07, 2016, 01:24:27 AM by KeithGrima »

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #329 on: September 07, 2016, 09:05:27 AM »
My answers below in Blue

Can anyone please share how they start(from scratch) and maintain their sourdough please.

There are probably 1000's of ways to start a starter from scratch and I doubt there is any one that is a whole lot better than the others. Here are a couple you might try:

http://ruhlman.com/2009/07/simple-sourdough-starter/
http://www.food.com/recipe/nancy-silverton-s-grape-sourdough-starter-316306

Some Questions:

1) Should sourdough ratio always be 1:1:1 (when starting) or is this only for feeding

When feeding, it matters a lot less how you do it and a lot more that you do it the same way every time. That is the key to consistent, predictable results.

2) Should the flour for sourdough match the one used to make pizza dough

Not necessarily. I don't.

3) What Flour do you suggest for sourdough

One that you have readily available.

"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline KeithGrima

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #330 on: September 09, 2016, 03:36:13 AM »
Hey thanks or the reply. Basically I had a starter going this week but activity stopped suddenly(was extremely bubbly on day 3). I realized that probably I was under feeding it. As I was not feeding equal amounts, was only discarding 100g every feed. I will be starting a new one today and will keep the ratio 1:1:1. Will let you know.


Offline Ovenray

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #331 on: September 09, 2016, 08:29:33 PM »
After going through the things you documented I reminded myself of a small coolingbox and some freezepacks I never use anymore. Its a 13 liters Campinggaz box and the freezepacks are the M10-DUO type. I've set it up in the same way you did though because its very small in comparison I doubted if it would work but after a few days I can confirm it actually does. I have used a container fit for two doughballs (270 grams each), filled it up with water, put one frozen freezepack next to it and stuck a thermometer in the container. The outside temperature is about 25C (77F) over here currently (no airconditioning) but the small freezepack keeps the water in the container at a constant 18C (64F). I have replaced the freezepack every 12 hours (cycle) and the drop in temperature is only about 1C after each cycle.

I have never done a long ('semicold') ferment with a culture, but I'm ready to give it a shot to see what all the noise is about. Gonna be two firsts as till now I only did yeast-crust-pizza's, and used RT short fermented sourdough for bread, while now I will apply the coolingbox(method) to try my first ever long fermented sourdough pizza-crust. Took me about 30 years, and this forum, to give sourdoughcrust a go but perhaps its not too late for me yet  :D


« Last Edit: September 09, 2016, 08:31:12 PM by Ovenray »
I'm grateful for all things learned.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #332 on: September 09, 2016, 09:03:34 PM »
I have never done a long ('semicold') ferment with a culture

I wouldn't call it "semicold." It's either "cold" or it isn't. There is a reason why refrigerators are <5C/40F, and it's not because microbes grow well there.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Ovenray

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #333 on: September 09, 2016, 09:32:54 PM »
I wouldn't call it "semicold." It's either "cold" or it isn't. There is a reason why refrigerators are <5C/40F, and it's not because microbes grow well there.

With all due respect Craig but that is just the obvious isnt it. In a relative sense it is neither cold nor warm taken into account the fridge (cold) and the outside temperature (warm) so I called it like that in the absence of a better word (hence the apostrophs).
I'm grateful for all things learned.

Offline Neopolitan

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #334 on: September 11, 2016, 01:47:18 PM »
luke-cold? :angel:

Offline IIFYMpizza

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #335 on: October 17, 2016, 04:08:53 AM »
Hi Craig,

2 days ago i started a culture using one of the methods that you linked (using grapes), which i have to thank you for, it was very helpful. I used rye flour as the instruction stated its easier to start with this type of flour. After 24h in the kitchen it started to double in size and by the night it filled the whole jar (see pictures attached). It started to smell fruity and lightly sour. I also tested if its going to float on the water and it did. What do you think i should do now? The instruction says it should be left for 6 days before you do anything with it, than you feed it twice and after that it can be used. Do you think i need to ferment it uninterupted for 4 more days if it already seems alive or would you remove the fruits and give it a couple feedings and than use it?
« Last Edit: October 17, 2016, 06:25:33 AM by IIFYMpizza »

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #336 on: October 17, 2016, 09:42:56 AM »
Hi Craig,

2 days ago i started a culture using one of the methods that you linked (using grapes), which i have to thank you for, it was very helpful. I used rye flour as the instruction stated its easier to start with this type of flour. After 24h in the kitchen it started to double in size and by the night it filled the whole jar (see pictures attached). It started to smell fruity and lightly sour. I also tested if its going to float on the water and it did. What do you think i should do now? The instruction says it should be left for 6 days before you do anything with it, than you feed it twice and after that it can be used. Do you think i need to ferment it uninterupted for 4 more days if it already seems alive or would you remove the fruits and give it a couple feedings and than use it?

It looks like it is very lively and sounds like it smells good. My guess is that it's ready to us, however you might divide it in half. First half, leave for 6 days as directed. Second half, mix with an equal volume of water and a weight of flour equal to the water you added - it should be a thick-batter-like consistency. If it doubles in a couple hours, it should be good to go. Maybe one more feeding like that and then test it out in a dough.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage