Author Topic: How to achieve "micro-blistering" with cold ferment only  (Read 96 times)

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Offline PizzaGarage

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I’m looking to achieve those tiny blisters on the bottom of my thin crust but doing so with cold ferment only.
I have been able to achieve blistering by using a 24hr RT (70 degrees) followed by a 24hr CF (36 degrees) but not with a 48 hour CF alone.  I absolutely love the blistering and the style is a Chicago thin, low hydration, sheeted and docked dough.
Formulation:
AP flour – Ceresota,  43% Water, .3 IDY, 3% oil, 1% sugar,1.75% Salt.  Off mixer at 78 degrees, balled, cross stacked, 45 min cool at 36 degrees then nested for 48 hours.  After 48, dough warms to 55-60 degrees, is sheeted thin, then metal pinned docked.  Dough is then placed on pizza rounds with semolina to prevent sticking, and stacked then put back into the fridge.  To make the pizza, dough is removed cold (36 degrees) dressed and baked at 475 on stone (deck oven)
Process CF VS RT:  RT created blistering CF did not:
For CF the process above is followed but what I did this time was take 4 lbs of dough, oiled all around and put that into a container for 24 hours which sat at 70 degrees.  I then balled and placed into the fridge for another 24 for CF.   I then had a combination of balls that were all CF and some a combination RT and CF.
Blistering:
The combo ball RT/CF blistered 100% of the time, the CF did not.  The RT/CF dough was so much better tasting I was surprised and since it was blistered had this great initial crunch…there was a big difference between the dough, RT/CF was better than CF alone.
Question:
The RT/CF ball had more fermentation and suspect this is why I have blistering (plus the cold to cook process above).  Is there a starting point I can use to get close to the yeast increase percentage I would need for the CF dough to blister when used after 48 hours.  I might be missing something of course but it seems to me if I increase my yeast percentage by “X” I would be able to achieve the same fermentation rate of the RT/CF ball with just CF.  Or, is it possible the oil put on the RT dough in the container is responsibile for the blistering?
Any help or ideas would be great and appreciated!!
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 11:53:58 AM by PizzaGarage »

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: How to achieve "micro-blistering" with cold ferment only
« Reply #1 on: Yesterday at 01:40:22 PM »
PG;
I'm glad that you went on to describe the blistering that you are looking to achieve, when you mentioned "micro blistering" I thought you were referring to the tiny blisters, looking something like a heat rash, but instead it appears that you are looking for the small bubble formation in the dough that is notorious for contributing to a crispy crust. This is the same structure that makes the cracker type crusts so crispy. Your observations are correct in that fermentation is needed to develop these blisters (actually small bubbles about the size of a cherry pit). You can increase the amount of fermentation the dough receives in any given length of time by increasing the yeast level but there is a point which is different for all doughs where during oven spring when all that yeast begins producing leavening gas and that gas is expanded by oven heat that the bubbles begin to disappear and form into larger, uncontrollable bubbles. I think a better approach would be to just increase your finished dough temperature in 5F increments until you achieve the amount of fermentation necessary to give you the bubbles in your dough. Temperature is a driver of fermentation so by increasing the temperature and keeping everything else the same you will get more fermentation within that given time without the potential oven spring issues experienced with high yeast levels.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline PizzaGarage

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Re: How to achieve "micro-blistering" with cold ferment only
« Reply #2 on: Yesterday at 03:13:21 PM »
Thank you Tom, I did mean the blistering that looks like a heat rash.  Using the RT/CF combo ball I got it every time and that's what I'm trying to replicate with CF only.  Doing an RT is too inconsistent (temps) so really want to be able to get it with CF alone

Thanks!!

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: How to achieve "micro-blistering" with cold ferment only
« Reply #3 on: Yesterday at 04:13:30 PM »
We see that a lot on crusts made using frozen dough too but I've never considered them to be sufficiently significant to contributs to any significant level of crispiness.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor