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Author Topic: Croissant dough for pizza?  (Read 125 times)

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Offline stamina888

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Croissant dough for pizza?
« on: Yesterday at 11:32:20 PM »
I like croissants for their rich, soft, flakiness.  Is it possible to make a croissant pizza that has those qualities but still a sturdy enough crust?

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Croissant dough for pizza?
« Reply #1 on: Yesterday at 11:50:26 PM »
You bet! Tony's (frozen pizza) did just that a good number of years ago when they introduced their Italian Pastry Crust Pizza. The basic dough formula isn't all that much different from a pizza dough formula until you begin adding the roll-in fat (10 to 15%). Two three-folds and a book-fold should be sufficient for what you want to do. You can also use a blitz pastry dough method too. By this method butter is cut into small pieces, frozen and mixed into the dough, the dough is then folded a few times, set aside to rest for a couple hours in the cooler, brought out, and allowed to warm JUST until the dough can be rolled out to about 3/16-inch in thickness, it is then allowed to rest for about 20-minutes, dressed and baked. We made them for about two years until the interest cooled so we stopped making them in our class.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline stamina888

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Re: Croissant dough for pizza?
« Reply #2 on: Today at 12:15:20 AM »
I do remember liking the dough in Tony's frozen pizza.  It does have those croissant qualities and a little sweetness.  That kind of dough plus better qualities toppings would be excellent.

I'm confused at putting chunks of butter into the dough.  Wouldn't it be easier to just melt it and mix it into the dough just like the olive oil?

Offline stamina888

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Re: Croissant dough for pizza?
« Reply #3 on: Today at 12:15:53 AM »
Does butter offer different qualities than oils (apart from flavor?)

Online the1mu

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Re: Croissant dough for pizza?
« Reply #4 on: Today at 12:19:08 AM »
Does butter offer different qualities than oils (apart from flavor?)

To create a laminated dough you need a solid fat, not a liquid one.

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Offline stamina888

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Re: Croissant dough for pizza?
« Reply #5 on: Today at 09:28:49 AM »
I made a quick pizza with Pillsbury croissant dough.  I used Paul Newman's Marinara, Galbani's Fresh Mozzerella, and EV Olive Oil.  The bread tasted great.  It had a little bit of a sloppy structure, but it was soft, crispy, and one of my better pizzas overall.  I can see myself using KABF and laminating it in the future,

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Croissant dough for pizza?
« Reply #6 on: Today at 10:09:52 AM »
The whole idea behind putting small pieces of frozen butter into the dough is to achieve a dough-fat matrix, as the dough begins to warm the butter melts creating a void which accomplished some of the benefits of laminating the dough without the need to go through a number of laminations. If the butter is not frozen or if its melted it will just mix into the dough with absolutely no benefit to producing this unique type of dough which is created through the development of multiple layers of dough and fat throughout the entire dough structure. The Blitz (fast) method as describer using the frozen pieces of butter doesn't allow for creating the laminations but it does result in a similar type of structure and eating characteristic.
If you study up on making a laminated dough it will help you quite a bit if you decide to try your hand at making a croissant dough. You will need to have a rolling pin or pastry pin and a little time as well as knowledge in how to make the different lamination folds. As I said before, two three folds and a book fold are plenty for making pizza. When making your laminated dough it is best to use a Danish butter (Lapur) I think the name is. This butter is VERY DIFFERENT from table grade butter in that it is still plastic at refrigerated temperature. The amount of butter added will be 15 to 25% of the dough weight. When adding the butter it needs to be added at room temperature for east of application, after the first folding procedure the dough is refrigerated for about 60-minutes and given the second lamination followed by a recommended over night refrigeration period before being given the last lamination fold. There is a WHOLE LOT more to it than what I've described here so you will really need to read up on the process to get a feel for it prior to attempting it.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline csnack

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Re: Croissant dough for pizza?
« Reply #7 on: Today at 12:38:22 PM »


When making your laminated dough it is best to use a Danish butter (Lapur) I think the name is. This butter is VERY DIFFERENT from table grade butter in that it is still plastic at refrigerated temperature.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

What do you mean by the butter still being plastic?


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Croissant dough for pizza?
« Reply #8 on: Today at 12:44:29 PM »
Tom,

You make no mention of yeast/fermenting/proofing. Were you making pizzas with yeasted croissant dough or puff pastry? Thanks.

Bill

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Croissant dough for pizza?
« Reply #9 on: Today at 01:05:24 PM »
Bill;
Puff pastry is made without yeast, and croissant dough gets its only fermentation from that over night rest in the fridge. No other fermentation is required or desirable.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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Online the1mu

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Re: Croissant dough for pizza?
« Reply #10 on: Today at 01:23:32 PM »

What do you mean by the butter still being plastic?

I think he is referring to it's ability to be manipulated and formed which is hard to do with "regular" butter.

Online invertedisdead

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Re: Croissant dough for pizza?
« Reply #11 on: Today at 02:15:46 PM »
You bet! Tony's (frozen pizza) did just that a good number of years ago when they introduced their Italian Pastry Crust Pizza.

Is this the same dough used in the Tony's pizza pouches? I used to think they were a million times better than Hot Pockets.


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Croissant dough for pizza?
« Reply #12 on: Today at 03:08:35 PM »
I like croissants for their rich, soft, flakiness.  Is it possible to make a croissant pizza that has those qualities but still a sturdy enough crust?

I make both pizza and croissants at least once per week and even though I have tried a few approaches for combinations of croissant-pizza and pizza-croissant, I've never had a "hey, you got peanut butter in my chocolate...." moment. The whole was never greater than the sum of the parts. I only use sourdough starters and long RT fermentation in both, so YMMV.

However, I have had really good success with "pizza" appetizers made with puff pastry - in the style of an Alsatian tarte with white cheese, red onions and bacon. My sourdough puff pastry is based loosely on the King Arthur method.

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