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Author Topic: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage  (Read 164332 times)

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Offline MichaelS

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #340 on: May 03, 2017, 11:53:00 AM »
Hi Craig,

I always used CF to make my dough, but the way you do it interests me very much.

So I decided to give it a try. I made my dough yesterday according to your percentages and it is fermenting in the kitchen right now.

What makes me wondering is I noticed there appeared brown spots on my dough. I used Caputo 00, so it didn't come frome the flour I use. It's something I've seen in my Dough when it ferments for more than 2 day, I always wondered what it is. Is that just normal, or should I trash the dough?

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #341 on: May 03, 2017, 01:41:07 PM »
I think it's fine. I see it all the time. I've never heard an explanation of what causes it that I thought was convincing.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Pizzaposer

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #342 on: May 20, 2017, 02:35:20 PM »
Craig,

I've been away from the forum for a while but I remember that you had a thread where you were experimenting on less work-intensive doughs and processes.  I've searched for quite a while on the site and can't seem to find it.  Would you mind posting a link if you get a chance? Life has gotten much busier and I would love to get away from a 48 hour dough.  Much appreciated.  :D

Offline JAG

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #343 on: May 20, 2017, 08:09:47 PM »
MichaelS,

This article may help with your question regarding spots in you dough.

http://www.pmq.com/May-2017/What-causes-speckled-pizza-doughand-how-to-solve-the-problem/

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #344 on: May 20, 2017, 09:41:23 PM »
Craig,

I've been away from the forum for a while but I remember that you had a thread where you were experimenting on less work-intensive doughs and processes.  I've searched for quite a while on the site and can't seem to find it.  Would you mind posting a link if you get a chance? Life has gotten much busier and I would love to get away from a 48 hour dough.  Much appreciated.  :D

Really, you can just adjust the yeast or culture with the tables back to 24 hours and you're good to go. If you are making NY as opposed to NP, add 1% diastatic malt powder.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

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Offline Pizzaposer

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #345 on: May 21, 2017, 11:12:05 PM »
Thanks, much appreciated.  When you said "diasatatic malt powder" did you mean LDMP or has the general consensus changed in that DMP is acceptable? (I've got some DMP from Penn Mac that is sitting in my cupboard because I'm afraid to use it.)

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #346 on: May 21, 2017, 11:21:04 PM »
Thanks, much appreciated.  When you said "diasatatic malt powder" did you mean LDMP or has the general consensus changed in that DMP is acceptable? (I've got some DMP from Penn Mac that is sitting in my cupboard because I'm afraid to use it.)

Yes, I did mean LDMP. Any DMP should be fine presuming you know the lintner value - if it's more than 20, just adjust how much you proportionally. For example, if it's 40, you'd use half as much.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline bradtri

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #347 on: June 24, 2017, 09:49:55 AM »
Hey Craig - I've been settling into the following dough/workflow:

GM Neapolitan 00 flour
65% water
4% Ischia
2.7% salt
2% oil

48 hour ferment at 61F.   38 hour bulk and 10 hours in balls.  My bulk size is about 5 kg in a Cambro container.

I chilled my water this last time so that my dough was starting out < 70F

At the 38 hour mark when I go to make balls, my bulk ferment is usually doubled in size.

Do you think this is normal?  Or is it too far along?

I'm wondering if I need to further chill my water so that the bulk dough starts out almost at 61F.

Pizzas have been really good, with the occasional problem of doughiness showing up on a pizza that is otherwise quite well-colored on the outside.  Not sure if that's being caused by a dough issue or by not getting the skin stretched out completely.

Below pics are at 38 hours.  It started out just above the 5L mark.

Just had a wedding party with 50 pizzas get called off for tonight .... I guess everybody's invited to my house for pizza tonight!!! 


 :-\

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #348 on: June 24, 2017, 10:06:30 AM »
That's 2X the culture I use (in the summer, I use 1.9%, and in the winter I use 2.1%). Nowadays, I pretty much always ball 10-12 hours before service. I want to see just a small amount of rise - lots of tiny little bubbles but no real rise to the dough, maybe 10%. All my rise happens in the last 10+ hours. Using the wood dough trays that insulate a lot better than plastic, I generally go to room temperature with 6 hours to go. In plastic, I leave it in the cooler pretty much the whole time, but keep an eye on it, if it's not looking like its progressing fast enough, you might have to warm it some. Remember, make small corrections early rather than large corrections later. Done right, this dough will give you a service window of 8 hours easy. If you have to make a big correction late in the process, you could easily cut that in half.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline bradtri

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #349 on: June 24, 2017, 10:31:35 AM »
That's 2X the culture I use (in the summer, I use 1.9%, and in the winter I use 2.1%). Nowadays, I pretty much always ball 10-12 hours before service. I want to see just a small amount of rise - lots of tiny little bubbles but no real rise to the dough, maybe 10%. All my rise happens in the last 10+ hours. Using the wood dough trays that insulate a lot better than plastic, I generally go to room temperature with 6 hours to go. In plastic, I leave it in the cooler pretty much the whole time, but keep an eye on it, if it's not looking like its progressing fast enough, you might have to warm it some. Remember, make small corrections early rather than large corrections later. Done right, this dough will give you a service window of 8 hours easy. If you have to make a big correction late in the process, you could easily cut that in half.

Thanks.   On the chart 61F and 4% comes to 48 hours.  2% at 61F is 59 hours. 

So, by going to room temp you're basically just doing a dual temperature ferment to "catch" the dough up that would normally take 59 hours?

I put the balls on aluminum sheet pans with plastic covers and they are transported to my gig in insulated carriers.  Is the fast cooling of the metal interfering with the dough balls?

Just trying to figure out if I want to go into these carriers with the balls having been at 6 hours of room temp or if I'd be better off going straight from the cooler at 61F into the insulated carriers.

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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #350 on: June 24, 2017, 11:15:27 AM »
Thanks.   On the chart 61F and 4% comes to 48 hours.  2% at 61F is 59 hours. 

So, by going to room temp you're basically just doing a dual temperature ferment to "catch" the dough up that would normally take 59 hours?

Yes, I haven't really thought about it, but that's basically right. 40h @ 61F followed by a slow and steady 8h increase to 75F or so.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #351 on: June 24, 2017, 11:16:33 AM »
I've never let the dough rise on aluminum; I can't say if it makes a meaningful difference.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

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