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Offline alex_chef2000

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #520 on: September 23, 2011, 11:10:08 PM »
Hi there, this kind of alsatian pizza is what I bake for myself everytime.

I use for the sauce 1/2 cup of sour cream, 1 egg yolk, pepper, nutmeg and salt.  Sometimes I use Gouda cheese or Mozzarella or Gruyere and caramelized onions

The origin of this flat bread is Alsacia, before WW1 was part of Germany, today is a region of France, with all German influence like the use of beer, apples, sausages, bacon, etc.

I share a picture of one of them from couple of months ago, I hate to take pictures...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bibianamorelos/5784767760/in/photostream

With my culinary regards,


Alex.:

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #521 on: September 24, 2011, 02:31:09 PM »
Below are some interesting pictures illustrating Da Michele's style of sliding garnished pizza discs from the bancone to the pizza peel. (In the third picture, the right and left rims overlap the pizza peel so that the the high-hydrated and silky pizza disc would form a circular configuration as it slides on the peel and lands on the oven floor. Basically, the right and left rims overlapping the peel increase resistance toward being slid from the peel to the oven floor; hence, the square pizza disc becomes elongated into a circle as it slides and lands on the oven floor.) Good weekend everyone!



« Last Edit: September 25, 2011, 01:49:05 PM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #522 on: September 24, 2011, 03:53:57 PM »
Dear Omid, you are a humble guy, but you know that I will be washing the dishes in your Pizzeria Napoletana nella foresta nera   ;)
Have you tried tarte flambee/Flammekueche in the Alsace region or the area around Freiburg ?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarte_flamb%C3%A9e
I love the simplicity with sour cream, bacon, onions, salt, pepper, nutmeg. Actually my grandparents used to bake WF bread in their home oven (which served as a heating source as well) and Flammekueche was done with the leftover dough and testing the heat.

Legend says that the "creators" of this dish were Alemannic-speaking farmers from Alsace, Baden or the Palatinate who used to bake bread once a week or every other week. In fact, the tarte flambée was originally a homemade dish which did not make its urban debut until the "pizza craze" of the 1960s. A tarte flambée would be used to test the heat of their wood-fired ovens. At the peak of its temperature, the oven would also have the ideal conditions in which to bake a tarte flambée. The embers would be pushed aside to make room for the tarte in the middle of the oven, and the intense heat would be able to bake it in 1 or 2 minutes. The crust that forms the border of the tarte flambée would be nearly burned by the flames.[3] The result resembles a thin pizza.

Hope you and others don't mind me posting in your thread. I will try to do it this weekend and post a picture.

Best wishes
martin

Dear Martin, what do you mean by, "Hope you and others don't mind me posting in your thread"? This thread belongs to anyone who is passionate about Pizza Napoletana and the culture(s) it entails. So, please, feel free to make your posts here any time.

I am not sure if Schwarzwald (the "Black Forrest") would be an ideal location for opening a Neapolitan Pizzeria! ??? Nonetheless, that is where my favorite German philosopher, Martin Heidegger, remains buried! Can you imagine this: "Filosofico Pizzeria di Heidegger" or "Philosophische Pizzeria von Heidegger"? We can share washing the dishes!

Yes, I have tried tarte flambée on several occasions, but not in Deutschland. I always enjoyed their unique texture and flavors. There used to be a French restaurant here in San Diego that prepared them. Unfortunately, the recent recession forced the restaurant to be closed for good.

I look forward to the pictures of your Flammekueche. Guten tag!

Respectfully,
Omid
« Last Edit: September 25, 2011, 12:20:22 PM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #523 on: September 24, 2011, 04:46:27 PM »
Opps, I did it again! I inadvertently erased whatever I had posted here in this spot. Sorry!
« Last Edit: September 26, 2011, 09:30:04 AM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #524 on: September 24, 2011, 10:12:30 PM »
I hope what happened to me never befalls you! A week and a half ago, I purchased 12 bags of Caputo "The Chef's Flour", which is reportedly the mini version of Caputo "Pizzeria", type "00". Each bag had an expiration date of "12/13/2011". (If I had remembered to check the expiration date before the purchase, I do not think that I would have bought the flours that were so close to the expiration date.)

1st Caputo Bag:
Last Monday, I grabbed one of the Caputo bags to make some Neapolitan pizza dough, using my wife's Kitchen Aid mixer and employing the direct method, as I have done hundreds of times before with the same type of flour. I used the following ingredients, portions, and temperatures:

1000 gr. Capto Flour (Datum Point) (72.2° F)
600   gr. Water        (60%)            (67.1° F)
28     gr. Sea Salt     (2.8%)           (74.3° F)
1       gr. Fresh Yeast (0.1%)

As the dough was being mechanically kneaded inside the bowl, I noticed it was not reaching the "pasta point" as defined in this thread at "Reply #377". (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,14506.msg149303.html#msg149303) Basically, the 1629.50 grams of dough, after about 4 minutes of mixing and about 10 minutes of kneading lacked the level of homogeneity, consistency, structural formation, skin formation, extensibility, and elasticity that I normally reach after the same amount of time and under the same circumstances. I let the mixer knead the dough for two more minutes. No point! Again, two more minutes. No point! Again, two more minutes. No point in sight! Two more . . . Jesus! I tentatively concluded that either this particular flour has gone bad or it contains unusually lower amount of gluten-begetting protein. The kneaded dough just could not pass the dough-film test; it easily tore into pieces upon being stretched. The dough simply had very little strength.

2nd Caputo Bag:
I grabbed a second bag of the Chef's Flour and repeated the same recipe, portions, almost the same temperatures, and procedure as above. The results were no different than the preceding! I began to question and scrutinize the methods that I employed. I could not find any contributory cause in them. How about the flour? Nothing looked out of the ordinary to my naked eyes. It did not smell rancid or stale, and it felt as usual when I compressed it between my fingers. How about the pH level of the water (Evian natural spring water)? I had no means of testing its acidity or alkalinity. To take my skepticism to the extreme, I even questioned the sea salt (Trapani wet sea salt).

3rd Caputo Bag:
I grabbed a third bag of the Chef's Flour and repeated the same recipe, portions, almost the same temperatures, and procedure as above, with the following exceptions: I used Acqua Panna natural spring water and île de Ré wet sea salt. The results were as mediocre as above. At this point, I was almost convinced that something was wrong with the flour. Nevertheless, I did not discard the dough. I kept it and prepared, after 24 hours of fermentation, the inferior pear pizza shown in the pictures below. I had to be extremely cautious in stretching the dough into a disc; otherwise, it would have developed tiny holes all over the dough disc. Although the floor of my oven was 958° F and the dome about 894° F, it took a little over 4 minutes for the pizza to bake to this point! Strange!

4th Caputo Bag:
Next day, on Tuesday, I grabbed a fourth bag of the Chef's Flour and repeated the same recipe, portions, almost the same temperatures, and procedure as the 1st bag above, with the exception of using Tripani dry, not wet, sea salt. In addition, this time, I did a true 20-minute autolisi. The outcome was as repulsive as above.

5th Caputo Bag:
Next day, on Wednesday, I grabbed a fifth bag of the Chef's Flour and repeated the same recipe, portions, almost the same temperatures, and procedure as the 1st bag above, with the exception of substituting 30% of the Caputo flour with King Arthur all-purpose flour. The result was no different than above!

6th Caputo Bag:
Two days later, on Friday, I grabbed a sixth bag of the Chef's Flour and repeated the same recipe, portions, almost the same temperatures, and procedure as the 1st bag above, with the exception of substituting 10% of the Caputo flour with "80% gluten flour". The result was no different than above!

7th Caputo Bag:
I grabbed a 7th bag of the Chef's Flour and repeated the same recipe, portions, almost the same temperatures, and procedure as the 1st bag above, with the exception of substituting 20% of the Caputo flour with "80% gluten flour". (I hope it is realized how high this is!) In addition, I used my Godzilla mixer (Santos fork mixer) to knead the dough. The result was no different—even with all the gluten added to the Caputo flour! I was so perplexed.

A New Bag of Caputo:
This morning I went to Bristol Farms and purchased one bag of Caputo "The Chef's Flour", with the expiration date of "2/18/2012". I came back home and repeated the same recipe, portions, almost the same temperatures, and procedure as the 1st bag above. The dough reached the "pasta point" after 9 minutes of kneading. Beautiful!

I think one moral of the story is that one should not readily blame oneself and one's methodology for formation of substandard dough. Is it possible that Caputo placed a wrong type of flour, such as weak cake flour, in the bags? Or, did the flour simply lost its essence? Any comments?
« Last Edit: September 26, 2011, 09:38:30 AM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

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Offline alex_chef2000

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #525 on: September 24, 2011, 10:53:53 PM »
Gee, I did it again! I inadvertently erased whatever I had posted here in this spot. Sorry!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bibianamorelos/5784767760/in/photostream/

Hi there, you quoted on my Alsatian pizza and daughter. Thankyou.

Sometimes ingredients come bad that way, you never know when a product was shipped, if the container was left at the sun for  a long time or if the shipment came in a frozen container with other foods, etc.

I made another Alsatian tonight, for me, it is still my favorite, the bad thing is that I will start cutting back, last Friday my blood pressure was way high and the doctor ask me to cut back, he will check me again next October 28.  So I decided to be in a mediterranean diet but no carbs at all for the first months, I don't want to take high pressure pills.

We use to bake our own breads ( sourdough, rye and Pumpernikel ) to make sandwiches and I am fan of the Key Lime Pound Cake.

From now on I will not be doing many home experiments using carbs.

My culinary regards,


Alex.:

« Last Edit: September 24, 2011, 10:59:57 PM by alex_chef2000 »

Offline pizza dr

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #526 on: September 24, 2011, 11:37:19 PM »
Well I think we have a definite conclusion.  The flour was ill. 

Offline wheelman

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #527 on: September 24, 2011, 11:45:23 PM »
 Omid,
i've had a bad experience with the red 1kg bags of Chef's Flour too.  it was chunky and hard out of the bag and the dough was a flop.  happened on a night when i needed everything to work well.  i've used pizzaria since.  
bill

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #528 on: September 25, 2011, 01:50:01 AM »
http://www.flickr.com/photos/bibianamorelos/5784767760/in/photostream/

Hi there, you quoted on my Alsatian pizza and daughter. Thankyou.

Sometimes ingredients come bad that way, you never know when a product was shipped, if the container was left at the sun for  a long time or if the shipment came in a frozen container with other foods, etc.

I made another Alsatian tonight, for me, it is still my favorite, the bad thing is that I will start cutting back, last Friday my blood pressure was way high and the doctor ask me to cut back, he will check me again next October 28.  So I decided to be in a mediterranean diet but no carbs at all for the first months, I don't want to take high pressure pills.

We use to bake our own breads ( sourdough, rye and Pumpernikel ) to make sandwiches and I am fan of the Key Lime Pound Cake.

From now on I will not be doing many home experiments using carbs.

My culinary regards,

Alex.:

Dear Alex, I am sorry to hear about your health problem. Yet, your precious daughter must be the best medicine for your blood pressure! I wish you a fast recovery. By the way, I apologize for accidentally quoting over and erasing my previous response to your post. Good night!
« Last Edit: September 25, 2011, 02:08:29 AM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Matthew

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #529 on: September 25, 2011, 04:43:54 AM »
Omid,
FWIW, when I was purchasing Caputo flour for personal use, I always purchased the 55 lb bag & in some cases used it past its expiration date with no issues whatsoever.  I know that Antimo is very conscious about quality control and that the flour destined for export does not sit in silos.  It is milled by order and shipped out right away.  So I don't believe that it was incorrectly bag although anything is possible.  With respect to  issues that you experienced my conclusion would be without question poor storage by your supplier.  We let the flour acclimatize for at least 48 hours prior to using it.  The reason being is that sometimes our flour is sent to us along with other products in refrigerated trucks and the flour can & will pick up some moisture.  I have spoken with our supplier about this and in future I will refuse any flour delivered in a refrigerated truck.  I cannot risk a bad batch of dough.  It is difficult enough dealing with all the factors associated with a naturally fermented dough in a commercial environment, the last thing I need is a bag of flour that is not performing due to poor storage.

Best of luck,
Matt

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #530 on: September 25, 2011, 08:32:26 AM »
Omid,

Several years ago, in 2005, I had a discussion with Fred Mortati, of Orlando Foods, the importer of Caputo flours into the U.S., about the recommended window of usability of the Caputo 00 flours. I believe at the time the only Caputo 00 flours that were being imported into the U.S. were the Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour and the weaker Caputo Extra Blu 00 flour. Fred said that officially the window of usability was 8 months. However, he thought that that was unrealistically low, especially when compared with U.S. flours, and we both felt that if the flour was kept in a cool, dark place with adequate ventilation, one could expect to use the flour over a period of 1-2 years. I have no idea as to whether the above still applies today.

Peter

Offline Martino1

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #531 on: September 25, 2011, 11:06:29 AM »
Dear Alex,
I hope you get better soon. i don't think avoiding Pizza is a good advise. Good olive oil, lycopene from the tomatoes and a bit of bread c an't be wrong. Just cut out "french fries and sugar "  ;)
Dear omid, I loved your shot of black forest, makes me missing home. The people like the sun then wine, good quality food, so maybe there is a spot for a pizzeria napoletana.
I did the Tarte Flambee which was quite nice, though i prepared it a bit like a pizza bianca. I tried to push the rim down and also some of the sour cream has dried out a bit, but the simple taste is really nice.

Your flour desaster shows your comittment to achieve the perfect result. I hope you find out what the problem was. Would be interesting to know. Pizzamaking is a bit like golf: you think you know how it works and this is the time when you receive a drawback. So we will never think we can master a pizza, so we keep on improving... isn't this sad ? Maybe you can explain philosophically ?  ;)
Have a good week all pizza makers.
Martin
Pizza is the only dish perfect for breakfast, lunch, tea, dinner, late night snack ;-)

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #532 on: September 25, 2011, 05:04:40 PM »
I hope what happened to me never befalls you! A week and a half ago, I purchased 12 bags of Caputo "The Chef's Flour", which. . . .

Sometimes ingredients come bad that way, you never know when a product was shipped, if the container was left at the sun for  a long time or if the shipment came in a frozen container with other foods, etc.

Well I think we have a definite conclusion.  The flour was ill.

Omid, I've had a bad experience with the red 1kg bags of Chef's Flour too.  it was chunky and hard out of the bag and the dough was a flop. happened on a night when i needed everything to work well.  i've used pizzaria since.  
bill

Sometimes our flour is sent to us along with other products in refrigerated trucks and the flour can & will pick up some moisture.  I have spoken with our supplier about this and in future I will refuse any flour delivered in a refrigerated truck.  I cannot risk a bad batch of dough.  It is difficult enough dealing with all the factors associated with a naturally fermented dough in a commercial environment, the last thing I need is a bag of flour that is not performing due to poor storage.
Best of luck,
Matt

Omid, several years ago, in 2005, I had a discussion with Fred Mortati, of Orlando Foods, the importer of Caputo flours into the U.S., about the recommended window of usability of the Caputo 00 flours. I believe at the time the only Caputo 00 flours that were being imported into the U.S. were the Caputo 00 Pizzeria flour and the weaker Caputo Extra Blu 00 flour. Fred said that officially the window of usability was 8 months. However, he thought that that was unrealistically low, especially when compared with U.S. flours, and we both felt that if the flour was kept in a cool, dark place with adequate ventilation, one could expect to use the flour over a period of 1-2 years. I have no idea as to whether the above still applies today.
Peter

Your flour desaster shows your comittment to achieve the perfect result. I hope you find out what the problem was. Would be interesting to know. Pizzamaking is a bit like golf: you think you know how it works and this is the time when you receive a drawback. So we will never think we can master a pizza, so we keep on improving... isn't this sad ? Maybe you can explain philosophically ?  ;) Have a good week all pizza makers.
Martin

Dear friends, I thank you all for your comments. I would like to add another moral of my story, above, in Reply #524. And, I do so, with outmost earnestness, as a most beneficial advice to the beginners who strive to become better pizzaioli:

It is imperative to understand through and through the "point of pasta", which is a concrete, not fanciful or abstract, term. One got to know its various, empirical manifestations in terms of look, feel, range of temperatures, shades of color, and so on. One got to train one's senses to be able to detect such vital attributes. Not testing a freshly kneaded dough for signs of "point of pasta" is like jumping out of an airplane without inspecting the parachute! Unfortunately, I have known a few pizzerias that neglect to look for such signs during and after kneading their doughs. All they are concerned about is if their doughs thicken into a clustered mass, which is not enough. If a flour shows no signs of illness, as was the case in my story, testing for "point of pasta" may bring to light the defects of the flour and save you time and the reputation of your pizzeria, if own one.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2011, 08:10:22 AM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #533 on: September 25, 2011, 07:35:57 PM »
Below are some interesting pictures illustrating Da Michele's style of sliding garnished pizza discs from the bancone to the pizza peel. (In the third picture, the right and left rims overlap the pizza peel so that the the high-hydrated and silky pizza disc would form a circular configuration as it slides on the peel and lands on the oven floor. Basically, the right and left rims overlapping the peel increase resistance toward being slid from the peel to the oven floor; hence, the square pizza disc becomes elongated into a circle as it slides and lands on the oven floor.)

Someone emailed and asked me outstanding questions, "Why not lay a disk of dough on a pizza peel and then put the toppings on it . . . instead of laying the dough disk on a countertop, garnish it and slide it over to the peel? Why do it the hard way? What is the difference?" Great questions! Indeed, why go through all the trouble of doing it the Neapolitan way? Why not just do it the easy way, the way commonly done by non-neapolitan pie makers? I am not sure if I have the right answers, so I will try to examine the Neapolitan method of transporting a topped dough disc onto a pizza peel.

§Tenderness:
I recall that a long time ago I was told: The way a garnished pizza disc is transferred to a peel and is stretched—correlates with the tenderness of the crust. Is there, in fact, such a correlation? When a garnished dough disc is slid over to a pizza peel and is stretched, does the dough acquire a certain tenderness after it is baked? If a piece of dough is compressed right before its placement inside an oven, it can bake into a less tender baked good. What if the same piece of dough is stretched, not compressed, before being transferred inside the oven? My assumption is that it will bake into a more tender baked good, for stretching causes the gluten strands to move away, rather than move against, one another—akin to the "Big Bang" which theoretically has brought about a universe that is less dense because all the celestial bodies and galaxies keep moving away from one another, expanding the universe. By analogy, if one places dots (representing gluten strands) on a deflated ballon, the distance between the dots will increase as the balloon is inflated and stretched with air. (The applicability of this analogy might be questionable.)

§Avoiding Excess Flour:
Well, the stretching can definitely be done after a dough disc is placed on a pizza peel and after it is garnished. However, this method will not shake off the excess flour, if any, beneath the dough disc. The excess flour aggregated below the dough disc definitely has a negative impact on the tenderness and flavor of the crust. Moreover, the ash from the excess flour can quickly accumulate on the oven floor in a high-volume pizzeria.

§Release of Tension in the Rim:
At last, it has been said that the Neapolitan method of transferring a garnished dough disc from a bancone to a pizza peel relinquishes the tension that builds up in the rim during opening of the dough ball. Hence, the rim bakes into a softer [and more aesthetic looking] cornicione.

§Tradition:
An explanation underlying the Neapolitan way of transporting a garnished dough disc onto a pizza peel may simply lay in the fact that it is a "tradition". For instance, why do Jews daven (repeatedly sway forward and backward) when they recite the Torah? No one knows, except it is a tradition! That reminds me of the line from the movie "Fiddler on the Roof" which I find quite relevant to the topic at hand:

"A fiddler on the roof. Sounds crazy! But here, in our little village of Anatevka, you might say every one of us is a fiddler on the roof trying to scratch out a pleasant, simple tune without breaking his neck. It isn't easy. You may ask 'Why do we stay up there if it's so dangerous?' Well, we stay because Anatevka is our home. And how do we keep our balance? That I can tell you in one word: tradition!"

For sure, in general, the Neapolitans favor a pizza that is tender in crust and cornicione. And, they go extra miles to achieve that. If a Pizza Napoletana could talk, it would agree with Elvis Presley when he sang, "Love me tender, love me true. . . ."! After all said and done, I do not believe the Neapolitan method is a prerequisite to a great pizza; there is more than one way to skin a cat! Below are pictures of different styles of pizza transportation by Da Michele, Pasquale Makishima, Trianon, and Gino Sorbillo.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2011, 07:42:01 PM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #534 on: September 25, 2011, 07:36:20 PM »
Continuation:
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

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Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #536 on: September 25, 2011, 07:39:34 PM »
Continuation:
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #537 on: September 25, 2011, 07:43:01 PM »
Continuation:
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #538 on: September 25, 2011, 07:43:55 PM »
Continuation:
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

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    • A Philosophy of Pizza Napoletanismo
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


 

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