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Offline norma427

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San Marzano Tomatoes and processing?
« on: July 13, 2017, 08:46:01 AM »
The unspecific kind of San Marzano tomatoes are still growing good.  Whether they would produce good fruits isn't known though.  Wanted to know if any members can help with ways to process them to taste, feel and look like processed good San Marzano tomatoes?  I am not familiar how to process them and just want a general idea what to do if they continue to grow well.

The grape tomatoes were planted too close to the San Marzano tomatoes, but they have started to produce decent grapes tomatoes.  At least they can be used on pizzas and look like they will be plentiful. 

Thanks for any help!

Norma

Offline foreplease

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Re: San Marzano Tomatoes and processing?
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2017, 11:17:39 PM »
We have done a lot of canning of tomatoes and tomato sauce for 25 years or more. Penn State and/or their county extension offices should have easy to follow brochures. Most advise adding citric acid or lemon juice to each jar. We never did it. Almost all commercial sauces have some kind of acid added. We didn't want that. We do add salt to the top so each jar of tomatoes (not sauce) though.  We did hot water bath processing. Other popular way is pressure cooker, which we don't have.

Steps are basically:
Clean under faucet
Peel by putting in boiling water for a minute, then into very cold water, peels slip off easily with a little nudge from a paring knife
I would cut them in half top to bottom just to get a good look at whether or not there is anything inside you don't want to eat
Fill sterilized jars
You may have to crush or Food process a few to have enough liquid to fill to within 1/2" of top of jar
Use the handle of a rubber spatula to swish around jar to make sure you have no voids/air bubbles
Screw on a sterilized lid and ring
Water in your canning pot or deep sauce pan needs to cover jar lids by an inch. Start cold (non-hot/cooked) jars in cold water, heat to boil, once it boiled I think you have to do pints 40 min and quarts 50 - but it might be 30 and 40. Hot jars (if you cook and can sauce) can be put into hot water. Same rules and times as above once it boils.
Jars shouldn't touch each other but they tend to move. Don't worry too much about it. If you put a clean washcloth in the pot before setting cans in they will not move so much.
Before you start, get one of those jar pullers?  Not sure what they are called but they are about $5 and you will need one to get hot jars out of hot water
Set jars on towel or cooling rack. You will hear some pop as they seal almost right away, some may take an hour or more. Once they reach room temp if you have any that did not seal refrigerate and use them soon.Take a Sharpie and write date and contents on lid before putting them up.

Good luck!
« Last Edit: July 13, 2017, 11:23:22 PM by foreplease »
-Tony
I find it easier to imagine a diet of nothing but ice cream than one without ice cream

Offline norma427

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Re: San Marzano Tomatoes and processing?
« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2017, 05:52:52 AM »
We have done a lot of canning of tomatoes and tomato sauce for 25 years or more. Penn State and/or their county extension offices should have easy to follow brochures. Most advise adding citric acid or lemon juice to each jar. We never did it. Almost all commercial sauces have some kind of acid added. We didn't want that. We do add salt to the top so each jar of tomatoes (not sauce) though.  We did hot water bath processing. Other popular way is pressure cooker, which we don't have.

Steps are basically:
Clean under faucet
Peel by putting in boiling water for a minute, then into very cold water, peels slip off easily with a little nudge from a paring knife
I would cut them in half top to bottom just to get a good look at whether or not there is anything inside you don't want to eat
Fill sterilized jars
You may have to crush or Food process a few to have enough liquid to fill to within 1/2" of top of jar
Use the handle of a rubber spatula to swish around jar to make sure you have no voids/air bubbles
Screw on a sterilized lid and ring
Water in your canning pot or deep sauce pan needs to cover jar lids by an inch. Start cold (non-hot/cooked) jars in cold water, heat to boil, once it boiled I think you have to do pints 40 min and quarts 50 - but it might be 30 and 40. Hot jars (if you cook and can sauce) can be put into hot water. Same rules and times as above once it boils.
Jars shouldn't touch each other but they tend to move. Don't worry too much about it. If you put a clean washcloth in the pot before setting cans in they will not move so much.
Before you start, get one of those jar pullers?  Not sure what they are called but they are about $5 and you will need one to get hot jars out of hot water
Set jars on towel or cooling rack. You will hear some pop as they seal almost right away, some may take an hour or more. Once they reach room temp if you have any that did not seal refrigerate and use them soon.Take a Sharpie and write date and contents on lid before putting them up.

Good luck!


Tony,

Thanks so much for your detailed post!   ;D

I guess if the San Marzano's are any good I have a lot of things to do. 

Norma

Offline foreplease

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Re: San Marzano Tomatoes and processing?
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2017, 12:18:51 AM »
You're welcome, Norma. One step I missed above is after you fill your jars, use a clean damp paper towel tot clean any drips or spills off top edge of the jar, the part you sealing lid will directly contact. You want that clean and good contact when it it timeto put them together. They will probably taste better and more like you are used to once they have gone through the long heat of the canning process so I would encourage to to at least test one jar of best ones you can pick, then cool them to room temperature and taste one compared to a raw one fresh off the vine and see if it is worth pursuing for you. Make a pizza with each and see what you think. This is your chance to take a stand and keep those nasty basil leaves out of your home canned tomatoes  ;D  Looking forward to seeing you post your results.
-Tony
I find it easier to imagine a diet of nothing but ice cream than one without ice cream

Offline norma427

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Re: San Marzano Tomatoes and processing?
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2017, 07:24:41 AM »
You're welcome, Norma. One step I missed above is after you fill your jars, use a clean damp paper towel tot clean any drips or spills off top edge of the jar, the part you sealing lid will directly contact. You want that clean and good contact when it it timeto put them together. They will probably taste better and more like you are used to once they have gone through the long heat of the canning process so I would encourage to to at least test one jar of best ones you can pick, then cool them to room temperature and taste one compared to a raw one fresh off the vine and see if it is worth pursuing for you. Make a pizza with each and see what you think. This is your chance to take a stand and keep those nasty basil leaves out of your home canned tomatoes  ;D  Looking forward to seeing you post your results.

Tony,

Thanks so much for the additional tip of using a clean damp paper towel to clean any drips or spills off the top edge of the jar.  I can understand why that would be a good idea to use.  Lol about nasty basil leaves in home canned tomatoes.  I actually like fresh picked basil in the Saporito with basil.  :-D If the San Marzano tomatoes keep growing well am anxious to taste them fresh off the vine and canned.  There seems to be a lot of San Marzano tomatoes but they would ripen at different times.   

BTW, about my different basil plants.  They aren't doing too well after all of the rain in our area.  I was having plenty of basil to take to market each week, but this week there won't be any for market.  I did put some sprigs in water and brought them inside and they seem to be sprouting roots really well.  Also took some seeds (what I thought might be seeds) out of some really good oregano and am trying to sprout those seeds outside.  They might grow or not. 

Norma

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Offline norma427

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Re: San Marzano Tomatoes and processing?
« Reply #5 on: Today at 04:00:57 AM »
The San Marzano tomato plant is getting bigger.  Lot of San Marzano tomatoes.

Norma

Offline norma427

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Re: San Marzano Tomatoes and processing?
« Reply #6 on: Today at 04:08:47 AM »
Might as well post the basil on this thread in case if might get added to the San Marzano tomatoes at some point in time.  Started from  a cutting of basil outside and then it was rooted.  Now planted inside.  All of the basil outside aren't doing well.

Norma

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