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Author Topic: "Thin" Version of Randy's American Style w/Bakers Percents  (Read 52769 times)

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Offline yangmanning

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Re: "Thin" Version of Randy's American Style w/Bakers Percents
« Reply #60 on: May 27, 2019, 10:35:08 PM »
Hi All!

Thanks Mr Randy and Mr Peter for your guidance. I attempted the recipe in Reply #8 over the weekend with good results. As usual, I used the CJ Beksul Korean Bread Flour available to me over here in Hong Kong.

I baked the pizzas on my new 14inch screens at the 2nd to bottom oven rack at 260C for 6 minutes, then transferred onto the pizza stone at the bottom rack for 5 minutes. The base was chewy and delicious, like an NY style. However, I did not get as much oven spring on the Rim as I'd wanted. Can anyone give some tips on how to improve it?

Also, when you all do a fridge fermentation for 48 hours, what temperature is your fridge?

Pictures Attached.

Thanks!

 

Online Pete-zza

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Re: "Thin" Version of Randy's American Style w/Bakers Percents
« Reply #61 on: May 28, 2019, 01:36:48 PM »
yangmanning,

I think your pizzas look very good.

As for your oven spring question, there are ways of increasing the oven spring but I was trying to stay pretty close to Randy's dough formulation. That formulation includes a lot of sweeteners (sugar and honey), totaling about five percent, and also a fair amount of oil, almost three percent. Unless you elevate the hydration value, the sweeteners and oil will tend to hold the oven spring down at normal oven temperatures. It is possible to increase the oven temperature from its normal value to increase the oven spring but you would have to watch the bottom crust very carefully and quickly move the pizza to a higher oven rack position once the bottom coloration is to your satisfaction inasmuch as the high sweetener level will be prone to cause a rapid darkening of the bottom crust, even to the point of burning if you are not careful. Moving the pizza up in the oven will allow the top of the pizza to finish baking. You might even lower the oven temperature when you move the pizza up in the oven. I discussed some of the above points in a post in the Papa John's clone thread at Reply 11 at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.msg58438#msg58438

As you can see from Reply 11, increasing the amount of yeast can also help increase the oven spring but that method did not appeal to me for the reasons noted in Reply 11. But your objectives may be different than mine so you should feel free to modify the dough formulation to achieve the results you are looking for. That would mean using a somewhat higher hydration value, less sweeteners, and more yeast, or some combination of these options.

As for my refrigerator temperature, depending on the time of year, I would say that it varies in a range of about 37-42 degrees F. At the higher end of that range, I might use colder water to achieve a lower finished dough temperature or use less yeast, or maybe even a combination of both methods.

Peter

Offline yangmanning

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Re: "Thin" Version of Randy's American Style w/Bakers Percents
« Reply #62 on: May 29, 2019, 03:41:48 AM »
This information is super helpful. I will try the colder water with reduced final dough temp. Thanks so much!

Offline Randy

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Re: "Thin" Version of Randy's American Style w/Bakers Percents
« Reply #63 on: June 10, 2019, 02:32:33 PM »
This information is super helpful. I will try the colder water with reduced final dough temp. Thanks so much!


Really nice looking pizza.

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