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Author Topic: Chicago Thin - a labor of love  (Read 197724 times)

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Offline nick57

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #700 on: September 26, 2019, 05:07:30 PM »
Quote
What was your reheat method?  Try a frypan on low, which heats it from the bottom up.

  Yes, I use a frypan. Most of the time I get great results, it all depends on the crust type. One would think you would get better results using a stone, but that's not the case. Even though the ATK formula is very close to yours which re-heats well, the ATK did not crisp up as much. I think you will like the parchment paper. The brand I use is 14" and I just make one cut so it is square. It makes for a nice handle to grab when removing it after a couple of minutes. This also gives me the chance to rotate the pie if it is not baking evenly.

Offline CookingFiend

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #701 on: September 26, 2019, 05:44:23 PM »
What was your reheat method?  Try a frypan on low, which heats it from the bottom up.

Stovetop pizza reheating - I use a non-stick pan, covered, on medium heat.  At the same time the bottom is getting crispy, covering the pan allows the cheese to quickly warm and get melty.

Offline CookingFiend

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #702 on: November 03, 2019, 02:26:36 AM »
Posted in error.  Deleted.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2019, 02:42:34 PM by CookingFiend »

Offline CookingFiend

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #703 on: November 03, 2019, 02:19:08 PM »
...
NOTE: As a no-knead dough, it requires a long, cold ferment. Make dough 72 hrs ahead (absolute minimum is 48 hrs.; still great after 96 hrs), kept in fridge until a couple hrs before baking.   Punch down if needed during the first 12 hrs.  I like to separate out the dough balls after the first 12 hrs. of rising as one mass.

MIXING: When making the dough, dump all the dry ingredients into the mixer bowl, stir to combine, and then add the liquids.  Be sure to use cool water (60o-ish?). Mix it just until the dough comes together and is uniform throughout.  It's done.  That is, don't knead it.  Cover it and stick it in the fridge for 72 hrs, when it's pizza time.
Garvey, I am a little confused about your no-knead method posting in 2013.  Could you please clarify your method?  Are you putting the freshly mixed dough, in one lump, directly in the refrigerator, then removing it after 12 hours to make the dough balls?  Wouldn't the cold dough be difficult to ball up?  Or, are you fermenting the freshly mixed dough at room temperature for 12 hours (punching down as needed) followed by balling the room temperature dough and refrigerating/cold-fermenting until a few hours before the dough is needed for pizza-making?

Offline CookingFiend

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #704 on: November 03, 2019, 03:42:20 PM »
:-D :-D :-D

I feel the same way about pie cut.  If I ever own a pizza shop, I have already decided that requests for pie cut will be a $2.00 upcharge.  I'm dead serious.  :chef:

...and my Minnesota husband would pay the $2.00 extra!  I'm dead serious too!!!

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Online Jackitup

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #705 on: November 03, 2019, 04:11:03 PM »
I'm in MN and any delivered or take home pizza is ALWAYS ordered "uncut"!!!
Jon

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Offline CookingFiend

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #706 on: November 03, 2019, 07:04:39 PM »
Nice.  I'm from Chicago, hubby's from MN but we've lived in CA for over 40 years.  No Chicago thin-crust style here.  So, when I make pizza, half is cut in pie wedges and half is tavern-style.  He says he likes to have crust with every slice.   ;)

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #707 on: November 03, 2019, 08:34:31 PM »
Garvey, I am a little confused about your no-knead method posting in 2013.  ...  Are you putting the freshly mixed dough, in one lump, directly in the refrigerator, then removing it after 12 hours to make the dough balls? 

Yes, that is correct.

Quote
Wouldn't the cold dough be difficult to ball up?

No, it's not really difficult at all.  It's nice and firm like cold play-doh.  For me, that makes it easier to weigh and separate, since it's not all warm and sticky.


All that said, you can even skip balling and leave it as a single mass until pizza time.  It's very forgiving.  Hope this helps!

Cheers,
Garvey
« Last Edit: November 03, 2019, 08:38:41 PM by Garvey »

Offline CookingFiend

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #708 on: November 03, 2019, 10:29:42 PM »
Thanks!  Im planning to make your pizza, sauce and sausage for cooking later this week.  Play-Doh-like dough sounds like fun!  Ill post pics later.

Offline CookingFiend

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #709 on: November 03, 2019, 10:31:00 PM »
Yes, that is correct.

No, it's not really difficult at all.  It's nice and firm like cold play-doh.  For me, that makes it easier to weigh and separate, since it's not all warm and sticky.


All that said, you can even skip balling and leave it as a single mass until pizza time.  It's very forgiving.  Hope this helps!

Cheers,
Garvey
Thanks!  Im planning to make your pizza, sauce and sausage for cooking later this week.  Play-Doh-like dough sounds like fun!  Ill post pics later.

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Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #710 on: November 04, 2019, 08:15:19 AM »
Im planning to make your pizza, sauce and sausage for cooking later this week. 

I'd suggest making the sauce right before making the pizza.  And if you're making sausage from scratch, start it the night before, no sooner.

Offline naval2006

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #711 on: November 04, 2019, 08:39:09 AM »
Garvey,

This thread is addictive, mate.  I'm gonna give it a try this weekend.  I have a doubt about the tomato paste.  In my country there's no tomato paste like the one you use, but there's what we call tomato extract, which is in fact a sweet tomato paste with a lot of tomato taste that we use to enhance the flavor of marinaras and other cooked sauces.  Is this the kind of paste you are talking about just mixed with water and the herbs?  Thanks for such a great recipe,

Alex


Offline thunder

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #712 on: November 04, 2019, 10:35:00 AM »
Garvey,

This thread is addictive, mate.  I'm gonna give it a try this weekend.  I have a doubt about the tomato paste.  In my country there's no tomato paste like the one you use, but there's what we call tomato extract, which is in fact a sweet tomato paste with a lot of tomato taste that we use to enhance the flavor of marinaras and other cooked sauces.  Is this the kind of paste you are talking about just mixed with water and the herbs?  Thanks for such a great recipe,

Alex

I wont answer for Garvey but that definitely sounds like what we would call paste in the States. Thick, rich and sweet.  Yours might come in tubes but it would be the same thing essentially.
« Last Edit: November 04, 2019, 10:51:04 AM by thunder »

Offline Slowhands1964

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #713 on: November 04, 2019, 12:00:48 PM »
I'd suggest making the sauce right before making the pizza.  And if you're making sausage from scratch, start it the night before, no sooner.

Mr. Garvey,

Recently, the kids came home with a Rosati's Pizza (franchise) and I was really impressed especially with the sauce. Never had one before, nor was I Chicago Pizza fan having lived through Godfather Pizza here in SoCal. 

Anyways, I Found your recipe (Post 3) and followed it to the tee and I must say it was a winner! Did a 72CF and 96CF and both were a huge hit!  However, your sauce, IMO, makes the pizza.  Spicy with a hint of sweetness and tart.  Love it!  Heck the family LOVED it. Very Rosati's, at least to our taste buds. Also, I had no problem refrigerating the sauce.  Well done, Sir.....Thank-you for sharing your work, and know that it is now in the rotation of a household who have never been to Chicago, let alone Illinois .

Oh, and your sauce rocks!

https://i.imgur.com/pMCIzMW.jpg
« Last Edit: November 04, 2019, 01:39:39 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #714 on: November 04, 2019, 12:16:35 PM »
Garvey,

This thread is addictive, mate.  I'm gonna give it a try this weekend.  I have a doubt about the tomato paste.  In my country there's no tomato paste like the one you use, but there's what we call tomato extract, which is in fact a sweet tomato paste with a lot of tomato taste that we use to enhance the flavor of marinaras and other cooked sauces.  Is this the kind of paste you are talking about just mixed with water and the herbs?  Thanks for such a great recipe,

Alex

Thanks, Alex.  I wish I could help but don't know anything about the product you're describing.  Best I can do is link to a description of what I use and hope it helps:
https://www.contadina.com/products/tomato-paste


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Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #715 on: November 04, 2019, 12:19:00 PM »
Mr. Garvey,

Recently, the kids came home with a Rosati's Pizza (franchise) and I was really impressed especially with the sauce. Never had one before, nor was I Chicago Pizza fan having lived through Godfather Pizza here in SoCal. 

Anyways, I Found your recipe (Post 3) and followed it to the tee and I must say it was a winner! Did a 72CF and 96CF and both were a huge hit!  However, your sauce, IMO, makes the pizza.  Spicy with a hint of sweetness and tart.  Love it!  Heck the family LOVED it. Very Rosati's, at least to our taste buds. Also, I had no problem refrigerating the sauce.  Well done, Sir.....Thank-you for sharing your work, and know that it is now in the rotation of a household who have never been to Chicago, let alone Illinois .

Oh, and your sauce rocks!

(https://i.imgur.com/pMCIzMW.jpg)

Thanks, Slowhands1964.  This recipe really is all about the sauce.  The dough is fine, and I guess the only real difference is that I bothered to write up detailed instructions and entire procedure for everything.  Most people don't bother doing that.  Glad you like it!

Offline CookingFiend

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #716 on: November 05, 2019, 04:40:13 PM »
Just had the most delicious lunch.  Garvey's no-knead version dough.  One cheese and sausage pie using Garvey's sauce, one cheese, sausage and onion pie using ATK's sauce.  Per Garvey's recommendation, sausage and onions were under the cheese topping.  Pre-heated baking steel in 500F oven for 1 hour, then reduced temp. to 450F for pizza cooking.  Roughly 14" diameter pizzas were cooked first on a perforated round on top of the baking steel and then, for the last 3-4 minutes, pizza was transferred directly onto the baking steel.  The dough rolled out very easily and required very little flour to prevent sticking.  Garvey's sauce was highly seasoned where ATK's sauce was very mild and sweet. I'm very happy with the resulting bottom crust being throughout.  Pizza was cut to accommodate my husband's request for wedges, not squares although he said the crust and bottom were so crispy, he might not mind eating squares.  Garvey's pizza dough will be my go-to for Chicago, thin crust pizza going forward.  Thanks Garvey!   ....and yes, I need a manicure.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2019, 05:54:21 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #717 on: November 06, 2019, 06:35:41 PM »
Nailed it!!!

(altho' the pie-cut half is a lil triggering...not gonna lie...lol)
« Last Edit: November 07, 2019, 10:04:16 AM by Garvey »

Offline TravisNTexas

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #718 on: November 07, 2019, 09:15:24 AM »
Lovely!  I believe this will be the next style I attempt to learn!  Just looks fabulous!
Cheers,
Travis

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #719 on: November 07, 2019, 02:40:01 PM »
Nice cheese crispies fiend!!   :drool: :chef:
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