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Author Topic: Chicago Thin - a labor of love  (Read 216974 times)

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Online Chicago Bob

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #740 on: December 05, 2019, 02:38:33 PM »
mbetter - where did you get your fennel pollen?  Kinda pricey.  Worth it? How would you say it differs, in aroma and flavor, from finely ground fennel seeds?

Some info. found here....https://www.spiceography.com/fennel-pollen-substitute/
I just received a tin from Amazon... Yes, very pricey. I'll report back here soon with my thoughts.
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Offline foreplease

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #741 on: December 05, 2019, 08:19:04 PM »
I recommended this one (fennel pollen) a couple weeks ago in another Chicago thread. Good stuff. I’ve used it twice since mentioning it.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005YJ45SK/?tag=pmak-20
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Offline jsaras

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #742 on: December 05, 2019, 09:04:04 PM »
They use that on some of the pizzas at Mozza.  Swanky stuff!
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Online Chicago Bob

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #743 on: December 05, 2019, 11:48:00 PM »
I recommended this one (fennel pollen) a couple weeks ago in another Chicago thread. Good stuff. I’ve used it twice since mentioning it.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005YJ45SK/?tag=pmak-20
yep, that's the one I got. Actually, I'm already not thrilled with it's flaura....
We'll see.  :chef:
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Offline foreplease

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #744 on: December 06, 2019, 12:22:22 AM »
yep, that's the one I got. Actually, I'm already not thrilled with it's flaura....
We'll see.  :chef:
No? That’s too bad and I’m sorry to hear it. I don’t think it can or should replace fennel seed in sausage making but I like using them together. It is overpowering each time you open the tin. Typically, I find myself hoping I do not sneeze, or spill any, or accidentally put everything I want to use with a pound of meat all in one place. Recently I used some on a pork shoulder and suspended it in some olive oil, then rubbed the mixture into the roast.


Keep playing with it. I can understand not wanting to eat something that tastes like a bouquet.
-Tony

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Offline mbetter

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #745 on: December 06, 2019, 11:48:42 AM »
mbetter - where did you get your fennel pollen?  Kinda pricey.  Worth it? How would you say it differs, in aroma and flavor, from finely ground fennel seeds?

Some info. found here....https://www.spiceography.com/fennel-pollen-substitute/

In my minimal experience so far, it seems significantly stronger than ground fennel seeds and more complex. I agree with foreplease that it shouldn't replace fennel seeds entirely in Italian sausage but seems to be very nice as an addition.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2019, 11:52:08 AM by mbetter »

Offline TravisNTexas

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #746 on: December 09, 2019, 09:17:17 AM »
Did one Garvey Chicago Thin Saturday night at 72 hours and one last night at 96 hours.  Used the sauce recipe exactly as written, but thined it out a bit for last nights bake because it does indeed get thicker with time!  First one was 3/4 Columbus Salami, Margherita Pepperoni, a Spanish chorizo that I forget the name of, and my sausage from the recipe posted above.  The second one was just the pepperoni and calabrian peppers.  Both were a mix of whole milk low moisture mozzarella with a small amount of medium cheddar and provolone, whit parm added as soon as they came out.  Got a couple of big bubbles in the second one but both were just amazing pizzas and I love the sauce!!
Cheers,
Travis

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #747 on: December 09, 2019, 09:40:33 AM »
Looks great!  WTG!


Offline TravisNTexas

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #748 on: December 10, 2019, 09:49:44 AM »
Used the last dough ball from the make last Wednesday last night.  Same sauce.  Just Italian sausage and Calabrian chilies on this one.  Despite being 120 hours old, the dough was great and the pizza was awesome again!  Loving this recipe Garvey!
Cheers,
Travis

Offline CookingFiend

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #749 on: December 10, 2019, 01:55:22 PM »
Used the last dough ball from the make last Wednesday last night.  Same sauce.  Just Italian sausage and Calabrian chilies on this one.  Despite being 120 hours old, the dough was great and the pizza was awesome again!  Loving this recipe Garvey!

Compared to your 72-hour dough, was there any crust flavor difference in your 120-hour dough?
-mickey

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Offline TravisNTexas

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #750 on: December 10, 2019, 02:05:21 PM »
It seemed that the 120 hour dough was crispier, but I am not experienced enough or consisten enough yet to tell whether that was just due to how I cooked it or was due to the dough fermentation.
Cheers,
Travis

Offline naval2006

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #751 on: January 03, 2020, 09:34:28 PM »
I went back to my oven and steel after redoing my kitchen and I made Garvey’s Chicago Thin with original sauce. Great recipe and the sauce was so tasty the kids asked for a plain tomato pie. Definitely a pizza to eat almost every day lol. Thanks Garvey for your recipe and your generosity to share,

Alex

Offline CookingFiend

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #752 on: January 04, 2020, 01:55:04 AM »
I went back to my oven and steel after redoing my kitchen and I made Garvey’s Chicago Thin with original sauce. Great recipe and the sauce was so tasty the kids asked for a plain tomato pie. Definitely a pizza to eat almost every day lol. Thanks Garvey for your recipe and your generosity to share,

Alex

I totally agree with you, Alex.  Thanks for posting such beautiful pictures.  You’ve inspired me to make a Garvey pie soon!
-mickey

Offline CMC

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #753 on: January 11, 2020, 08:05:46 PM »
I made this pizza for the first time and followed Garvey's formulas to the letter. One 300g dough ball with a 72hr CF, plus I made the sauce and sausage (using store bought ground pork) exactly per the recipes. For cheese I used 9oz of a blend comprised of 35% LMPS mozz, 25% WMM, 20% white cheddar, & 20% provolone. In retrospect, 9oz was a little much and next time I would dial it back to 7 or 8 to be within Garvey's specifications. I sprinkled with oregano after assembly. The dough was really easy to work with using barely any bench flour. I ended up with a really good circle on this one.

I used 2 stones - one on the second from top rack, one on the second from bottom rack. Oven preheated to 500° and then lowered to 450° right before baking. I launched onto the lower stone using parchment and pulled the paper after about 4 minutes. I think I left the pizza another 3-4 minutes before moving to the top stone, and I think I cooked it there for another 3-4 minutes before pulling it.

My wife and I thought it was great. The sauce is very zesty and herbacious. She prefers a slightly sweeter sauce, so I might adjust for that next time (she loved the sauce in Garvey's Aurelio's clone). What we didn't finish, I flipped over cheese side down onto a plate after it fully cooled and I put it in the fridge uncovered. This morning I ate the leftovers cold and it was great like that too. The crust was still crispy and crunchy.

I should have taken a few more photos but hunger and anticipation got the better of me. Next time...

Thanks a lot for sharing this Garvey. Your labor of love is much appreciated. Cheers.

Chris
« Last Edit: January 11, 2020, 08:09:46 PM by CMC »

Offline foreplease

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #754 on: January 11, 2020, 08:25:18 PM »
Terrific, CMC! This is on my short list of things to try soon. If my results look anything like yours I will be very happy. Thanks for posting and welcome to the forum.
-Tony

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Offline CMC

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #755 on: January 11, 2020, 09:20:35 PM »
Terrific, CMC! This is on my short list of things to try soon. If my results look anything like yours I will be very happy. Thanks for posting and welcome to the forum.

Garvey's detailed recipes make this one a keeper. I now have about 15lbs of pork butt destined to become a bigger batch of the sausage. :)

Thank you for the welcome. I'm not new to making pizza, but I've recently gone in full steam ahead with research on this forum and that has really improved my results in a short amount of time. For that, I'm incredibly grateful to the members for their shared knowledge and experience.

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #756 on: January 11, 2020, 10:08:32 PM »
That is 100% Pizza Factory right there!!!

Offline CMC

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #757 on: January 17, 2020, 10:10:23 AM »
I made a larger batch of the sausage over the last couple nights, using the meat from two bone-in pork butts.  After deboning and trimming most of the silver skin, I ended up with 14 lbs of meat and fat. 

On night #1 I seasoned the whole batch as follows:

Per pound of pork, add
9 grams kosher salt (2% by weight)
1 Tbsp fennel seed (I left half whole and partially buzzed the other half in a small blade-style coffee grinder)
1/2 tsp dried marjoram
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper  (I like this one - https://www.penzeys.com/online-catalog/whole-special-extra-bold-indian-black-peppercorns/c-24/p-1427/pd-s)
1 1/2 tsp sugar
1 large clove garlic, microplaned

I divided this into gallon zip bags and refrigerated for 24 hours.

On night #2, I put the meat in the freezer for about an hour before grinding it with a Cabela's Carnivore 1hp grinder with 10mm plate.  Sorry, no photos from night #2 due to sticky pork hands.

I split the ground pork in halves so that I could make mild and spicy versions.

For the mild, per pound of pork, I added 1 Tbsp Pinot Grigio before mixing.

For the spicy, per pound of pork, I added 1 Tbsp Pinot Grigio, 1 Tbsp crushed red pepper, and 1/8 tsp cayenne before mixing.  I fried up a little nugget of the spicy and thought this amount of pepper was just about right for my tastes.

Everything was portioned into 1lb vac bags for the freezer.

The seasoning here is pretty much Kenji's recipe but with half as much dried marjoram, and adding in about 2/3 the amount of white wine called for in Garvey's adaptation.  Good stuff, and I'm glad to have an ample supply now.  :)
« Last Edit: January 17, 2020, 10:35:02 AM by CMC »

Offline TravisNTexas

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #758 on: January 17, 2020, 10:32:31 AM »
I made this pizza for the first time and followed Garvey's formulas to the letter. One 300g dough ball with a 72hr CF, plus I made the sauce and sausage (using store bought ground pork) exactly per the recipes. For cheese I used 9oz of a blend comprised of 35% LMPS mozz, 25% WMM, 20% white cheddar, & 20% provolone. In retrospect, 9oz was a little much and next time I would dial it back to 7 or 8 to be within Garvey's specifications. I sprinkled with oregano after assembly. The dough was really easy to work with using barely any bench flour. I ended up with a really good circle on this one.

I used 2 stones - one on the second from top rack, one on the second from bottom rack. Oven preheated to 500° and then lowered to 450° right before baking. I launched onto the lower stone using parchment and pulled the paper after about 4 minutes. I think I left the pizza another 3-4 minutes before moving to the top stone, and I think I cooked it there for another 3-4 minutes before pulling it.

My wife and I thought it was great. The sauce is very zesty and herbacious. She prefers a slightly sweeter sauce, so I might adjust for that next time (she loved the sauce in Garvey's Aurelio's clone). What we didn't finish, I flipped over cheese side down onto a plate after it fully cooled and I put it in the fridge uncovered. This morning I ate the leftovers cold and it was great like that too. The crust was still crispy and crunchy.

I should have taken a few more photos but hunger and anticipation got the better of me. Next time...

Thanks a lot for sharing this Garvey. Your labor of love is much appreciated. Cheers.

Chris

That pie is just a thing of true beauty Chris!!  Outstanding!
Cheers,
Travis

Offline TravisNTexas

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #759 on: January 17, 2020, 10:36:33 AM »
I made a larger batch of the sausage over the last couple nights, using the meat from two bone-in pork butts.  After deboning and trimming most of the silver skin, I ended up with 14 lbs of meat and fat. 

On night #1 I seasoned the whole batch as follows:

Per pound of pork, add
9 grams kosher salt (2% by weight)
1 Tbsp fennel seed (I left half whole and partially buzzed the other half in a small blade-style coffee grinder)
1/2 tsp dried marjoram
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper  (I like this one - https://www.penzeys.com/online-catalog/whole-special-extra-bold-indian-black-peppercorns/c-24/p-1427/pd-s)
1 1/2 tsp sugar
1 large clove garlic, microplaned

I divided this into gallon zip bags and refrigerated for 24 hours.

On night #2, I put the meat in the freezer for about an hour before grinding it with a Cabela's Carnivore 1hp grinder with 10mm plate.  Sorry, no photos from night #2 due to sticky pork hands.

I split the ground pork in halves so that I could make mild and spicy versions.

For the mild, per pound of pork, I added 1 Tbsp Pinot Grigio before mixing.

For the spicy, per pound of pork, I added 1 Tbsp Pinot Grigio, 1 Tbsp crushed red pepper, and 1/8 tsp cayenne before mixing.  I fried up a little nugget of the spicy and thought this amount of pepper was just about right for my tastes.

Everything was portioned into 1lb vac bags for the freezer.

The seasoning here is pretty much Kenji's recipe but with half as much dried marjoram, and adding in about 2/3 the amount of white wine called for in Garvey's adaptation.  Good stuff, and I'm glad to have an ample supply now.  :)

Excellent, and thanks for posting your recipe and the process you used!  When I use up all the Italian sausage I currently have in vac bags in the freezer I am going to give this one a try!  Much appreciated post sir!
Cheers,
Travis

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