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Author Topic: Chicago Thin - a labor of love  (Read 225273 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #860 on: July 05, 2020, 04:20:05 PM »
I'm a relatively new member.  What is a "sticky"?
-mickey
mickey,

Threads that make it to sticky status go to the top of the list for a given topic. See, for example, the stickys for the Chicago style at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?board=25.0

You can see the pin symbols next to the threads in that list. Sticky threads are easier and quicker to find.

Peter

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #861 on: July 05, 2020, 05:24:55 PM »
Garvey,

You have touched a lot of members with your recipe and your guidance. So, I just made your thread a sticky. Congratulations.

Peter

Wow, thanks, Peter!  I am honored, and I am glad so many people have enjoyed this.

     That one is another beauty.....wow!  :o     And that crust is just perfect man. 💰

           Congrats on your well deserved sticky Garvey!!  :chef:

Thanks, Bob!  Dat’s 3/4 lb of sausage on dere, believe it or not.  I made the dough Wed afternoon and made a round of pies on Friday night.  The dough was really springy and snapping back too much after just the 48 hrs.  So I let the dough chill until today, Sun AM, and it was much easier to work with, at just fewer than 96 hrs of cold ferment.  We also got a new oven a week ago, so I’m still dialing it in.



« Last Edit: July 05, 2020, 05:29:28 PM by Garvey »

Offline HansB

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #862 on: July 05, 2020, 05:59:48 PM »
Garvey,

You have touched a lot of members with your recipe and your guidance. So, I just made your thread a sticky. Congratulations.

Peter

Well deserved!
Hans

Online Jackitup

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #863 on: July 05, 2020, 06:14:09 PM »
👊👊👊🤜🤛
Jon

“The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.”            -Mark Twain

If you don't think you're getting what you should out of life.....maybe you're getting what you deserve       -the Root Beer Lady

Offline Minolta Rokkor

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #864 on: July 08, 2020, 10:54:41 AM »
Seeing this, I HAVE TO MAKE pizza factory dough TODAY
Pizza is about balance, nothing more nothing less

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Offline Minolta Rokkor

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #865 on: July 09, 2020, 06:50:10 AM »
Nick:

Thanks for the kind words and the outstanding photographs.  Man, that pie looks so tasty and picture perfect.  You really nailed it!  I am glad to share this style of pizza with everyone who wants to try it.

Cheers,
Garvey

Garvey, what meat grinder should I buy for homemade sausage?

The manual one from Webstruant store? Like this?

https://www.webstaurantstore.com/weston-36-0801-w-8-deluxe-manual-meat-grinder/943360801W.html

Also with the pork shoulder, do I add in every bit of it, fat and all?

Just wondering on what equipment I need.
Pizza is about balance, nothing more nothing less

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #866 on: July 09, 2020, 11:21:48 PM »
Garvey, what meat grinder should I buy for homemade sausage?

The manual one from Webstruant store? Like this?

https://www.webstaurantstore.com/weston-36-0801-w-8-deluxe-manual-meat-grinder/943360801W.html

Also with the pork shoulder, do I add in every bit of it, fat and all?

Just wondering on what equipment I need.

Sorry, but I really don't know what equipment to recommend.  I have the grinder attachment for the KitchenAid, and it works fine, but I also admit that I already owned it for other cooking purposes so I just rolled with what I had.

Remove all connective tissue and hard fat.  I'll see if there's a primer somewhere.  You want it to not be too lean.

ETA: good instructions on trimming: https://www.instructables.com/id/Homemade-Sausage/
and there are videos on YouTube.  Ultimately, you'll need to play around and get a feel.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2020, 11:32:09 PM by Garvey »

Online CookingFiend

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #867 on: July 10, 2020, 01:11:22 AM »
Sorry, but I really don't know what equipment to recommend.  I have the grinder attachment for the KitchenAid, and it works fine, but I also admit that I already owned it for other cooking purposes so I just rolled with what I had.

Remove all connective tissue and hard fat.  I'll see if there's a primer somewhere.  You want it to not be too lean.

ETA: good instructions on trimming: https://www.instructables.com/id/Homemade-Sausage/
and there are videos on YouTube.  Ultimately, you'll need to play around and get a feel.
FWIW - When I’m not up to buying pork, trimming and grinding my own, I can find really good coarse-grind pork in Asian or Mexican grocery stores - lots to choose from here in Northern California.  Purchase several pounds at a time, season per Garvey’s recipe - it’s really delicious - and freeze portions for future use.
-mickey
-mickey

Offline foreplease

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #868 on: July 10, 2020, 12:24:57 PM »
Garvey, what meat grinder should I buy for homemade sausage?

The manual one from Webstruant store? Like this?

https://www.webstaurantstore.com/weston-36-0801-w-8-deluxe-manual-meat-grinder/943360801W.html

Also with the pork shoulder, do I add in every bit of it, fat and all?

Just wondering on what equipment I need.
I put every bit of it in when I make the sausage component of our big batch (54 lbs meat/80 lbs mix) Christmas meatballs. Once a year I grind everything in the back room of a butcher shop the guy lets me use. At home, for smaller batches I use the KA attachment and like it. A hand crank one such as you linked to should work very well. Seems they would take about the same amount of work to clean. A pot of boiling water is your friend.


Looking forward to seeing how your version of this style turns out. Next time I make it I need to make a post-it note to remind myself not to cut it in wedges.  ::)
-Tony

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #869 on: July 10, 2020, 12:32:35 PM »
To aid in cleanup of your grinder after meat, cheese, whatever.....run some day old crusty bread through just before disassembly.  ;)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

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Offline Minolta Rokkor

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #870 on: July 10, 2020, 02:20:21 PM »
Thanks for the info and help Garvey and Bob
Pizza is about balance, nothing more nothing less

Offline texmex

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #871 on: July 23, 2020, 01:44:27 PM »
Thanks for the recipe, it's a good crunchy crust.
I used what I had on hand... jarred marinara sauce, raw mild italian sausage and chopped up string cheese.
I made this one on the stone, and used a cutter pan for the 2nd (450°F / 15 mins. in my home oven)
« Last Edit: July 24, 2020, 05:17:36 AM by texmex »
Reesa

Offline Bmschmi

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #872 on: September 25, 2020, 12:14:13 PM »
PIZZA FACTORY SAUSAGE

Note: You must use a scale for this sausage. There is no way to accurately estimate the amount of salt needed otherwise. This recipe can be made with pre-ground pork as well. Mix ingredients as directed in Day 1, allow to rest at least 8 hours, then skip the grinding step and proceed as directed in the paddling step in Day 2 (i.e., all you need is the first step of Day 1 and last step of Day 2).

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 lbs. pork shoulder cut into rough 1-inch chunks
  • 17 g kosher salt
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 2 Tbs fennel seed, cracked/crushed in mortar & pestle
  • 1 tsp ground black pepper
  • 3 Tbs cold white wine (cheap, dry, and Italian), to be added on Day 2

PROCEDURE [Needs 24 hrs., ideally]

DAY 1:
  • Combine all ingredients EXCEPT WINE in a large bowl and toss to coat. Cover and refrigerate for at least 8 hours and up to 48 hours.
  • Place the meat grinder in the freezer overnight: the feed shaft, screw, blade, and 1/4-inch plate (the larger of the two for the KitchenAid).

DAY 2:
  • Chill meat and mixer bowl for 15-30 minutes in freezer before grinding. Grind meat at speed level 4 into the mixer bowl.  Make sure it doesn’t “smear” as it comes out: it should look clean and dry and ropey, like fresh ground hamburger.
  • In a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, ADD THE WINE and beat the sausage meat on medium high speed until it becomes tacky and sticky, about one minute. Wrap in plastic wrap to get out extra air and transfer to a zipper-lock bag and seal. Sausage will keep for up to 1 week in the refrigerator.

-------------------------
Adapted from J. Kenji Lopez-Alt, Serious Eats: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/09/juicy-sweet-or-hot-italian-sausage.html, http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2011/09/the-pizza-lab-why-does-sausage-need-to-be-salty.html, and http://aht.seriouseats.com/archives/2011/04/the-burger-lab-whats-the-best-way-to-grind-beef.html

Just curious, how does this sausage compare to say Johnsonville Italian Sausage?  Just wonder if it's worth the effort and purchase of a grinder?

Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #873 on: September 25, 2020, 05:45:39 PM »
Johnsonville doesn't have the right flavor profile at all.  It's pretty much the worst.

But instead of buying a grinder, just buy 80% lean ground pork!

Cheers,
Garvey

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #874 on: September 27, 2020, 05:38:24 PM »
Johnsonville doesn't have the right flavor profile at all.  It's pretty much the worst.

Totally agree.  Johnsonville makes great bratwurst but lousy Italian sausage.  I buy a local brand (Scimeca's) that has a flavor profile very close to what I experienced on pizzas in my younger days.
https://www.scimecas.com/

I recommend shopping around for a local brand in your area, and if that turns out being a bust, then make your own, starting with Garvey's suggestion and using one of the recipes found in the Pizzamaking.com forums.

-ME
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Offline Garvey

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #875 on: September 27, 2020, 10:34:42 PM »
Whole Foods sweet/mild Italian at the butcher counter is acceptable. A little lean, but it is supposedly a recipe from Chicago. It absolutely doesn't keep at all, though, so eat it up quick.

Offline HansB

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #876 on: September 27, 2020, 10:51:27 PM »
Whole Foods sweet/mild Italian at the butcher counter is acceptable. A little lean, but it is supposedly a recipe from Chicago. It absolutely doesn't keep at all, though, so eat it up quick.

I haven't made any since trying the Whole Foods Spicy Italian, we really like it on pizza.
Hans

Offline Nuke83

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #877 on: October 01, 2020, 01:27:49 PM »
Disregard, flipped though a few pages of the thread and found answer.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2020, 04:11:15 PM by Nuke83 »

Offline Nuke83

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #878 on: October 06, 2020, 11:55:37 AM »
So a question to which I likely know the answer, but will ask anyway, and share my first experience with this recipe.

First, outstanding tasting, thickness and textured pizza.  I've been focused on Chicago Deep Dish and finally have it where I'm satisfied.  Wife wanted me to try a pan, so I did a Pizza Hut pan clone, but frankly, it was lacking in flavor (mostly crust), more oily than I like and for the effort, would have been just as happy getting it takeout from the Hut.

So after reading the first two to three pages of this thread, tried this recipe and both my wife and I absolutely love it.  I went with the recommended max 8 oz of cheese and she wants more cheese, but other than that, her immediate remark was that this has great flavor, which is leading to my question.

She was at the store and I asked her to grab 12oz can of the Contadina paste.  They only had 6oz cans, so she grabbed those.  I used all the recommended spices, including correct brands where specified, and made the sause.  I just found 12 oz cans, so grabbed some for future pies, but what I noticed is that the cans I bought are "straight" paste whereas the 6 oz cans she had gotten were with "Italian Herbs", so basically with added basil and oregano.  I assume that the paste you (Garvey) and others have been using is the straight Contadina tomato paste?

I'm going to make the next sauce with the plain paste and see which we like better.  I may have inadvertently stumbled onto a recipe that we prefer, but won't know until we can compare

I'll also note that because I hadn't read through the entire thread when I made the first pair, I used PS Mozza vs. WM.  Will definitely use WM next time. I also hadn't gotten to the "no knead" formula in the thread, so I did the full blown knead, to close to the point of window pane, which took much longer knead time that recommended, so I am suspect of my dough consistency.  Will go kneadless next time.

Also, after having read through the entire thread, I will say that I didn't make my own sausage (will next pies), but used Publix brand bulk mild italian and thought it was very good.  I did use Whole Foods bulk once before with one of my Deep Dish pies and found it to be horribly fatty.  I'd take the Publix store brand over it every time.

Below was pizza 1, Pepperoni, sausage, green peppers & mushrooms.  Cooked on single stone, on parchment for first 3 mins.  Sauced and cheesed beyond the edge.  Pizza 2 (no pics) was same less the salad.

« Last Edit: October 06, 2020, 11:58:32 AM by Nuke83 »

Offline HansB

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Re: Chicago Thin - a labor of love
« Reply #879 on: October 06, 2020, 11:57:53 AM »
So a question to which I likely know the answer, but will ask anyway, and share my first experience with this recipe.

First, outstanding tasting, thickness and textured pizza.  I've been focused on Chicago Deep Dish and finally have it where I'm satisfied.  Wife wanted me to try a pan, so I did a Pizza Hut pan clone, but frankly, it was lacking in flavor (mostly crust), more oily than I like and for the effort, would have been just as happy getting it takeout from the Hut.

So after reading the first two to three pages of this thread, tried this recipe and both my wife and I absolutely love it.  I went with the recommended max 8 oz of cheese and she wants more cheese, but other than that, her immediate remark was that this has great flavor, which is leading to my question.

She was at the store and I asked her to grab 12oz can of the Contadina paste.  They only had 6oz cans, so she grabbed those.  I used all the recommended spices, including correct brands where specified, and made the sause.  I just found 12 oz cans, so grabbed some for future pies, but what I noticed is that the cans I bought are "straight" paste whereas the 6 oz cans she had gotten were with "Italian Herbs", so basically with added basil and oregano.  I assume that the paste you (Garvey) and others have been using is the straight Contadina tomato paste?

I'm going to make the next sauce with the plain paste and see which we like better.  I may have inadvertently stumbled onto a recipe that we prefer, but won't know until we can compare

I'll also note that because I hadn't read through the entire thread when I made the first pair, I used PS Mozza vs. WM.  Will definitely use WM next time. I also hadn't gotten to the "no knead" formula in the thread, so I did the full blown knead, to close to the point of window pane, which took much longer knead time that recommended, so I am suspect of my dough consistency.  Will go kneadless next time.

Also, after having read through the entire thread, I will say that I didn't make my own sausage (will next pies), but used Publix brand bulk mild italian and thought it was very good.  I did use Whole Foods bulk once before with one of my Deep Dish pies and found it to be horribly fatty.  I'd take the Publix store brand over it every time.

Below was pizza 1, Pepperoni, sausage, green peppers & mushrooms.  Pizza 2 (no pics) was same less the salad.

Try Whole Foods actual sausage links and remove the casing, it's really good.
Hans

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