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Offline FoodieZ

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #680 on: December 18, 2014, 09:15:01 PM »
I still have not found anything close to tasting like their pan crust, nor have I found a sauce recipe that has the spiciness or tang theirs does.

I'm just a humble, long time fan of the pizza, especially the sauce, and have been attempting to re-create it for... let's just say a long time. I used Lydia's recipe for a while, played around with Penzey's pizza spice, which seems to me to come somewhat close, then started changing my recipe around to compare to the little "sides" of red sauce that I was able to coax out of my local Round Table. I know they use a prepared sauce mix, but somehow it just seems that the flavor has varied by location, and perhaps over time as well. But for the here and now, here's my current go-to...

4 teaspoons ground coriander (gives it that distinct "orange-y" flavor)
2 teaspoons ground fennel
2 teaspoons dried mexican oregano
2 teaspoons dried basil
2 teaspoons granulated garlic
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoons granulated onion
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
3/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon dried sage
1/2 teaspoon turmeric (gives it that distinct "orange-y" color)
1/2 teaspoon Fruit Fresh (for the Ascorbic Acid and Citric Acid, tried other acidic ingredients, this seemed to work best for the "tangy")
1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne (the "bite", along with the black pepper)

Add approximately 3 teaspoons of this spice mixture to 3 ounces of tomato paste (I use Hunt's), then add about 1 1/2 to 2 ounces of water (again, my Round Table is inconsistent/thicker/thinner.


Shortcut to the above:

3 teaspoons Penzey’s Pizza Seasoning + 1 teaspoon coriander + 1/4 teaspoon Fruit Fresh + 1/4 teaspoon turmeric


YMMV...
« Last Edit: December 18, 2014, 11:31:15 PM by FoodieZ »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #681 on: December 18, 2014, 09:24:11 PM »
I'm just a humble, long time fan of the pizza, especially the sauce, and have been attempting to re-create it for... let's just say a long time. I used Lydia's recipe for a while, played around with Penzey's pizza spice, which seems to me to come somewhat close, then started changing my recipe around to compare to the little "sides" of red sauce that I was able to coax out of my local Round Table. I know they use a prepared sauce mix, but somehow it just seems that the flavor has varied by location, and perhaps over time as well. But for the here and now, here's my current go-to...

4 teaspoons ground coriander (gives it that distinct "orange-y" flavor)
2 teaspoons ground fennel
2 teaspoons dried oregano
2 teaspoons dried basil
2 teaspoons granulated garlic
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoons granulated onion
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
3/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon dried sage
1/2 teaspoon turmeric (gives it that distinct "orange-y" color)
1/2 teaspoon fruit fresh (tried other acidic ingredients, this worked best for the "tangy")
1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne (the "bite", along with the black pepper)

Add approximately 3 teaspoons of this spice mixture to 3 ounces of tomato paste (I use Hunt's), then add about 1 1/2 to 2 ounces of water (again, my Round Table is inconsistent/thicker/thinner.


Shortcut to the above:

3 teaspoons Penzey’s Pizza Seasoning + 1 teaspoon coriander + 1/4 teaspoon fruit fresh + 1/4 teaspoon turmeric


YMMV...
Thank you for your detailed post Z and welcome to the forum.   8)

We don't get many folks talking about sauce....I hope you stick around.   :chef:
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline wsonner

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #682 on: December 18, 2014, 09:52:13 PM »
I'm just a humble, long time fan of the pizza, especially the sauce, and have been attempting to re-create it for... let's just say a long time. I used Lydia's recipe for a while, played around with Penzey's pizza spice, which seems to me to come somewhat close, then started changing my recipe around to compare to the little "sides" of red sauce that I was able to coax out of my local Round Table. I know they use a prepared sauce mix, but somehow it just seems that the flavor has varied by location, and perhaps over time as well. But for the here and now, here's my current go-to...

4 teaspoons ground coriander (gives it that distinct "orange-y" flavor)
2 teaspoons ground fennel
2 teaspoons dried oregano
2 teaspoons dried basil
2 teaspoons granulated garlic
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoons granulated onion
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
3/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon dried sage
1/2 teaspoon turmeric (gives it that distinct "orange-y" color)
1/2 teaspoon Fruit Fresh (for the Ascorbic Acid and Citric Acid, tried other acidic ingredients, this seemed to work best for the "tangy")
1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne (the "bite", along with the black pepper)

Add approximately 3 teaspoons of this spice mixture to 3 ounces of tomato paste (I use Hunt's), then add about 1 1/2 to 2 ounces of water (again, my Round Table is inconsistent/thicker/thinner.


Shortcut to the above:

3 teaspoons Penzey’s Pizza Seasoning + 1 teaspoon coriander + 1/4 teaspoon Fruit Fresh + 1/4 teaspoon turmeric


YMMV...

I like this. A couple comments. I personally think the key ingredient to RT sauce is Hungarian paprika.  But that might just be my own taste. The fruit fresh is interesting and consistent with something I tried which was pineapple juice powder.  Unfortunately the only place I have found it was King Arthur's in VT and they stopped selling it. Maybe I'll look up Fruit Fresh.

Wes

Offline FoodieZ

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #683 on: December 18, 2014, 10:06:18 PM »
I like this. A couple comments. I personally think the key ingredient to RT sauce is Hungarian paprika.  But that might just be my own taste. The fruit fresh is interesting and consistent with something I tried which was pineapple juice powder.  Unfortunately the only place I have found it was King Arthur's in VT and they stopped selling it. Maybe I'll look up Fruit Fresh.

Wes

Yes, wsonner, I had seen the mention of Hungarian Paprika on the forum, which is always in my spice cabinet, and I tried it. For whatever reason, from my RT, that day, I was having trouble detecting that paprika flavor from the sauce sample at hand.

For the pineapple juice powder, have you tried Great American Spice Co.?:

http://www.americanspice.com/search.php?q=pineapple+powder



« Last Edit: December 18, 2014, 11:28:04 PM by FoodieZ »

Offline pacificx5

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #684 on: November 09, 2016, 06:22:31 AM »
Wow! I was really surprised to see this thread after so many years of looking at it on and off. The last time I tried some recipes was I think Lydia's Masa flour twist on it in 2011. I just got caught up on the last couple of pages, and let me throw in the opinion that the RT picture with the anchovies is definitely not representative of their pizza. In fact, I would say that a true round table pizza absolutely needs to be ordered with a "pan" style crust. It is the thickest crust and is a night and day difference with their regular crust. I think it's also somewhat harder for the cooks to get right since we've had many bad pizzas there, but when you have a good one, there is no other chain that can beat it (IMO). I'm not completely convinced the trans-fat is the cause of the problem; I tend to think it's the people cooking it not knowing what they're doing. I had a pizza a couple of weeks ago at the Oceanside location, and it was how I remember it from the early 90s. I would say they definitely miss more than hit nowadays, but don't give up on it until you've tried a good one. I've attached a picture of their pan crust I had that would make anyone want to spend countless hours trying to clone it.

However, I still have not found anything close to tasting like their pan crust, nor have I found a sauce recipe that has the spiciness or tang theirs does. I wish you guys the best of luck on this, and hopefully you make some good progress. I'll try to jump in and experiment once in a while, but I spent a lot of time on it in the past with very little progress.
Hello!
What is this pizza?
It looks damn good!

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline Lydia

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #685 on: November 09, 2016, 12:45:15 PM »
I'm just a humble, long time fan of the pizza, especially the sauce, and have been attempting to re-create it for... let's just say a long time. I used Lydia's recipe for a while, played around with Penzey's pizza spice, which seems to me to come somewhat close, then started changing my recipe around to compare to the little "sides" of red sauce that I was able to coax out of my local Round Table. I know they use a prepared sauce mix, but somehow it just seems that the flavor has varied by location, and perhaps over time as well. But for the here and now, here's my current go-to...

4 teaspoons ground coriander (gives it that distinct "orange-y" flavor)
2 teaspoons ground fennel
2 teaspoons dried mexican oregano
2 teaspoons dried basil
2 teaspoons granulated garlic
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoons granulated onion
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
3/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon dried sage
1/2 teaspoon turmeric (gives it that distinct "orange-y" color)
1/2 teaspoon Fruit Fresh (for the Ascorbic Acid and Citric Acid, tried other acidic ingredients, this seemed to work best for the "tangy")
1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne (the "bite", along with the black pepper)

Add approximately 3 teaspoons of this spice mixture to 3 ounces of tomato paste (I use Hunt's), then add about 1 1/2 to 2 ounces of water (again, my Round Table is inconsistent/thicker/thinner.


Shortcut to the above:

3 teaspoons Penzey’s Pizza Seasoning + 1 teaspoon coriander + 1/4 teaspoon Fruit Fresh + 1/4 teaspoon turmeric


YMMV...


Try swapping the tumeric for mustard powder. Note that different brands will have different amouts of zing. I typically start with Coleman's which is a good balance blend of brown and yellow with lots of zing. Also consider using a 3:1 ratio of Colemans to tumeric, especially if your not getting a color match.

Its been on my list to try, but after being transplanted in Alabama, far FAR away from any Round Table, I feel that I might not be able to Clone it. At best I would only be able to give my best balanced version from memory.

For Paprika, I have been using McCormick "gourmet" paprika. It's doesn't have the bitter edge that nearly all other have. It's getting a bit harder to find.

I still haven't tried the Penzy's pizza seasoning yet, but it sounds like I really should.
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Lydia

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #686 on: December 21, 2016, 02:23:16 PM »



 
Updates:
I have a new home for the video on my previous RT dough layering process available here at this link.


RT thick crust spreadsheet
Also, I had lost several files when my computer crashed just before our move. But I came across a copy on an old thumb drive. I cannot guarantee that it’s completely correct as I don’t know whether or not this is a copy of my final version.

Here is the replacement link for the "training by the slice" 80's RT vid.


I haven't done any work on the RT sauce since discovering that Mustard powder needs to be included. Here in the South I have Marco's pizza frequently and their sauce is very very similar except it has paprika instead of chili powder and has both basil and oregano. So what this means is that my "taste memory" for RT is now muddled. At best I could work with my last recipe to incorporate the mustard, ultimately recreating a recipe that taste "California" to me but I don't think it could be called a "clone".

Using google docs is new to me, so please let me know if there are any issues with the links and I'll try to get it figured out.

Thanks
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #687 on: December 27, 2016, 10:39:34 PM »
Thanks Lydia.  I always appreciate your input and experience on the RT pizza clone.

I know about Marco's.  They have been in our area for about 5-6 years now.  They are okay for a quick fix, but as for the sauce being close to RT's, I am not so sure.  Marco's seems more of a sweeter sauce, and not as much tang as RT's.  It's been a while since I have experience a true RT pizza, as well (2 years?).  We are headed to California in March.  Hopefully after that I can add some more insight into the sauce discussion.

Take care and keep on posting!  8)

-ME
Let them eat pizza.

Offline Lydia

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #688 on: December 28, 2016, 12:05:13 PM »

Ernie


Thanks for the kind words and encouragement.  :)


I completely agree with what your saying about Marco's sauce. I actually should have worded it differently than I did. I should have said that the "spice profile" is nearly the same, pecking order and ratios are not, with Marcos sugar ratio being higher. So no, they don't taste the same, but to me and my sensitive taste buds, I feel its close enough to create potential cloning issues without RT samples. but who knows, I could be underestimating my years of consuming RT.




Well, On a side note:


This weekend I went to get some more Quaker Harina mix and my heart sunk when I saw the dreaded "new label". Ugg!  :o


there is a formula change and it couldn't have come at a more inconvenient time. So I bought the last "old label" bag, went home, unloaded my groceries then headed back out to find more "old label" to hold me over long enough to find out if/how detrimental the changes are.



Old Label Ingredients: expire APR 2017
Ingredients: Enriched Bleached Flour (Bleached Wheat Flour, Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamin, Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Palm Oil, Salt, Leavening (Sodium Aluminum Phosphate, Sodium Bicarbonate, Monocalcium Phosphate), Corn Syrup Solids, Dough Conditioner Product (Whey, L-Cystine Monohydrochloride), Dextrose, Calcium Carbonate




New bags on shelves December 2016 expire JUL 2017


Ingredients: Enriched Bleached Flour (Bleached Wheat Flour, Niacin*, Reduced Iron, Thiamin Mononitrate*, Riboflavin*, Folic Acid*), Palm Oil, Salt, Corn Syrup Solids, Whey, Sodium Aluminum Phosphate, Dextrose, Sodium Bicarbonate, Calcium Phosphate, Calcium Carbonate, Mono and Diglycerides, L-Cysteine.*One of the B Vitamins.


I knew it was bound to happen sooner or later, but why NOW just after I got the fermentation all nailed down?  ???



















The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #689 on: December 29, 2016, 04:22:41 PM »
Ernie


Thanks for the kind words and encouragement.  :)


I completely agree with what your saying about Marco's sauce. I actually should have worded it differently than I did. I should have said that the "spice profile" is nearly the same, pecking order and ratios are not, with Marcos sugar ratio being higher. So no, they don't taste the same, but to me and my sensitive taste buds, I feel its close enough to create potential cloning issues without RT samples. but who knows, I could be underestimating my years of consuming RT.




Well, On a side note:


This weekend I went to get some more Quaker Harina mix and my heart sunk when I saw the dreaded "new label". Ugg!  :o


there is a formula change and it couldn't have come at a more inconvenient time. So I bought the last "old label" bag, went home, unloaded my groceries then headed back out to find more "old label" to hold me over long enough to find out if/how detrimental the changes are.



Old Label Ingredients: expire APR 2017
Ingredients: Enriched Bleached Flour (Bleached Wheat Flour, Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamin, Mononitrate, Riboflavin, Folic Acid), Palm Oil, Salt, Leavening (Sodium Aluminum Phosphate, Sodium Bicarbonate, Monocalcium Phosphate), Corn Syrup Solids, Dough Conditioner Product (Whey, L-Cystine Monohydrochloride), Dextrose, Calcium Carbonate




New bags on shelves December 2016 expire JUL 2017


Ingredients: Enriched Bleached Flour (Bleached Wheat Flour, Niacin*, Reduced Iron, Thiamin Mononitrate*, Riboflavin*, Folic Acid*), Palm Oil, Salt, Corn Syrup Solids, Whey, Sodium Aluminum Phosphate, Dextrose, Sodium Bicarbonate, Calcium Phosphate, Calcium Carbonate, Mono and Diglycerides, L-Cysteine.*One of the B Vitamins.


I knew it was bound to happen sooner or later, but why NOW just after I got the fermentation all nailed down?  ???

You are most welcome on the encouragement.  It is truly deserved.

Thanks for the clarification.  Next time we get a Marco's pizza, I will have to try to pay more attention to the flavor profile, although I am betting your taste buds are more sensitive and accurate than mine.

Well, too bad about the Quaker Harina Preparada.  But honestly, I have found the Wal-Mart equivalent works just as well (at least for me), and its ingredient blend is not exactly the same as Quaker's, so it may not be a total loss.  Perhaps you might notice a difference in terms of the flavor, but I think the texture of the crust has been pretty spot on with my use of the Wal-Mart product. Bummed that Quaker decided to throw in corn syrup solids, though.  I think there is a conspiracy in Iowa to get corn products into everything we use.  :-D

Happy New Year!  :)

-ME

Let them eat pizza.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #690 on: July 29, 2019, 07:10:17 PM »
It’s been a long time since anyone posted in this discussion, but recently I was asked to provide information on the results I had gotten from Lydia’s Round Table cheater recipe and provide further details.  After doing that, I decided to revive this discussion with a few new posts, starting with this one. 

Let me start off by saying several people contributed to deconstructing the RT pizza dough recipe for home use.  Some found good results with other recipes and techniques: DNADan and Pete-zza, to name just a couple.  For me, Lydia’s recipe got me the closest to an RT pizza by far of any of the various recipes that others posted to the forum.  I have learned after 14 years of visiting and participating in Pizzamaking.com discussion forums that not all recipes work the same for every person.  Factors such as utensils, ovens, different brands of ingredients, and environment (humidity), to name just a few, may sometimes make significant differences in results.  With all that in mind, here is what consists of my current recipe and procedure for making an RT clone pizza.  You can also adapt this recipe to make a good Chicago thin crust or cracker-style pizza. With the cracker crust, I would recommend dropping the water percentage, starting with a 3% decrease to about 47%, and then I would experiment with dropping it by 2% with each subsequent experiment to get the dough where you want it — air humidity will play a big role in this case).

For Lydia’s original cheater recipe, go here: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=1911.msg46228#msg46228

PART ONE

4 Ingredients:

12 oz bread flour (I have used either Better for Bread by Gold Medal or KA Bread flour and both have worked just fine)
4 oz Great Value flour tortilla mix (easier to find than Quaker Harina preparada flour tortilla mix but both will work)
1/2 Tbsp instant yeast (any brand)
8 oz water approx. 90°F (I decreased the H2O percentage to about 50% when I switched from the Quaker flour tortilla mix to the Walmart Great Value tortilla mix)

I sift the bread flour as I weigh it, as I do with all of my pizza dough recipes.  I find it makes for better incorporation of the flour and water.  Mix the ingredients in a food processor. I use a Cuisinart 11-cup mixer with a dough blade attachment.  You can drizzle the water in through the top, or pour it in at once and start mixing — it does not seem to make a difference.

Process in food processor until just combined.
Some yeast will not be dissolved.

There will be sticky areas, loose crumbs, and possibly some undissolved yeast.  From there, I pour the mixed dough into an old commercial bread loaf bag (a tip I got from Pete-zza which I use with all of my doughs).  You can dump the dough/crumbs a sheet of plastic wrap and seal it up. You should end up with an oblong lump of dough, which is easier to wrap than a ball of dough due to the width of the plastic wrap.

Let them eat pizza.

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #691 on: July 29, 2019, 07:15:38 PM »
PART TWO

Next, I proof the dough for 1 to 1 ½ hours at room temperature.  At that point, I fold the dough 2–3 times to incorporate all of the crumbs and yeast into the wet/sticky dough. I let it rest for another 1 to 1 ½ hours at room temperature, then I divide the dough in to separate balls.

Lydia proofed her dough for 3–4 hours. Halfway through the "rest", she folded the dough log 2–3 times to help incorporate the crumbs and yeast.  Her warning: Don't fold more than 3 times.

At this point, I divide my dough into 3 equally weighted dough balls, put each one into a bread loaf bag, and put them into the refrigerator for an overnight proof.  You can also divide the big dough ball into 6 balls, wrapped or sealed, and store them in the refrigerator, which is what Lydia recommended in her recipe. I normally only make 1 pizza with 3 larger dough balls for my family and have plenty of scrap, which I occasionally use to make a second pizza by folding it all together in a ball and rolling it out (much harder to roll out the second time). This recipe should be able to make two 14-inch pizzas with the 6-ball method. I typically get a 14” pizza with an approximately 12” additional pizza by rolling out the scraps with 3-balls.  The choice is yours.

After the overnight rest, I usually take my dough balls out of the refrigerator and let them sit at room temperature for about 30–40 minutes before I start rolling them out. I would not get them out anytime sooner.  I find the warmer the dough gets, the stickier it gets, as this is still fairly well hydrated dough. Again, climate can make a difference.

Like Lydia, I use a pastry/pie wooden board dusted with a heaping teaspoonful of bench flour to roll out my dough balls. I use a regular rolling pin.  I prefer a heavier metal rolling pin, but use whatever you like.  Roll the divided dough balls in just a bit of flour, then roll the dough out into a disc of even thickness without any additional flour or with only a barely visible coating. I flip the rolled out dough several times during this process and brush off any excess flour from the dough disk to the board as I go. After I have rolled out the dough so that I can sufficiently see through it, I move it over to a wooden pizza peel that is pre-dusted with semolina flour to prevent sticking and easy sliding. If you prefer to use regular flour or corn meal for dusting your peel, do whatever works for you. 

Three dough balls = 1 pizza dough, regardless of whether you divided the initial dough ball into 3 or 6 balls. 

Layer the rolled dough skins on top of each other. Take a round guide, such as a 14-inch pizza screen, and use a cutting wheel to cut the 3-layered dough skins into a nice, round shape. This will also seal the layers together.

Next, I dock the dough. I don’t think this step is essential; I leave it to you to decide if you feel the need to do it or not.

Next, since we are talking Round Table pizza, I apply a decent amount of sauce to the 3-layered dough skin.  Use whatever sauce you like.  There are even more opinions and recipes about the sauce as there are concerning the dough.  I have a couple go-to sauces that I use, one of which is a slightly modified version of The Pizza Factory sauce recipe originally posted by Garvey in the Chicago style forum: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=17662.msg171274#msg171274

For cheese, I use primarily a 3-cheese blend of mozzarella ~80%, provolone ~10%, and sharp cheddar ~10%.  You can also add some parmesan, if it suits your tastebuds.  Use whatever toppings you like.  For my family of 3, I make a ½ cheese and ½ Italian sausage (local brand) with mushroom pizza.  Occasionally I go crazy and throw on some Canadian bacon or pepperoni.



« Last Edit: July 30, 2019, 09:35:36 AM by Mad_Ernie »
Let them eat pizza.

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #692 on: July 29, 2019, 07:18:36 PM »
PART THREE

Baking

Use a preheated pizza stone, with your oven cranked up to the highest temperature you can get it. In the winter, I preheat my pizza stone in our oven for approximately 1 hour at 500 degrees F. In transferring the pizza to the cooking surface from the wooden peel, I use a metal peel that I slide between the pizza and the semolina-surface of the wooden peel (another trick I picked up on the forum, I think from Pete-zza). I do not use any type of screen – I found it did not help in the process of achieving the desired pizza crust texture, so I bake directly on the stone.  Again, feel free to use whatever works for you.

In nicer weather, I use a cheat: a 2stone pizza grill device on my Weber grill, which is also cranked up on high and preheated for approximately 1 hour.  The differences I notice in using the 2stone over the home oven are mainly 2-fold: 1) quicker cooking time, and 2) greater oven spring, particularly when it comes to bubbles in the pizza (which I love).  If you don’t like bubbles messing up your beautifully flat pizza, then use the indoor oven, set to 450–500 degrees, and preheat it for at least 45 minutes. I will warn you that bubbles may occur regardless of what heating apparatus you use to cook this pizza. This is actually commonly occurs with Round Table pizzas, and I’ve also seen it with similar pizzas like Happy Joe’s.  So docking your dough will not guarantee you a no-bubble pizza.  When I was watching a pizza being made at Happy Joe’s years ago, they had a guy follow the pizza through the conveyor belt process and open a little door that he would stick a long metal rod through to pop the bubbles.  I will use a long grilling fork in the same manner if the bubbling gets too extreme (like moving all of your toppings over to one side or off the pizza).

The results you see in the photos are from my most recent prep and cooking of a RT clone, using Better for Bread flour.  I probably could have taken it out of the 2stone 30–60 seconds sooner, but I had to change my propane tank for the grill in the middle of baking, so it threw off my baking time.  Nevertheless, it tasted great and the texture was pure crispy deliciousness!

Let them eat pizza.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #693 on: July 29, 2019, 09:37:32 PM »
Mad_Ernie,

That is a terrific write-up. Thank you.

For those who are interested, they can see the ingredients used in the Great Value flour tortilla mix at:

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Great-Value-Flour-Tortilla-Mix-4-lbs/10315924

As can be seen from the Great Value ingredients statement, it includes a baking powder. The way that the baking powder works when used to make a dough, see the entry Chemical Leavening Systems in the forum’s Pizza Glossary at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/glossary.html

Peter




Offline spacelooper

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #694 on: July 31, 2019, 07:35:15 PM »
Mad_Ernie,

     Thanks so much for this. This is the next beast I am going to try and tackle. This in depth discussion covers a couple other questions I had but didn't ask :)

thanks again,
Todd

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #695 on: July 31, 2019, 11:06:26 PM »
Mad_Ernie,

     Thanks so much for this. This is the next beast I am going to try and tackle. This in depth discussion covers a couple other questions I had but didn't ask :)

thanks again,
Todd

Glad I could help. It gave me a chance to share some of the personal tweaks I made to Lydia's original RT recipe. I find it good to actually stop and put into words what it is I am doing when I create something, like pizza.  If you can articulate the materials and methods well, it sometimes gives the investigator greater insight into the pieces and how each detail contributes to the whole.

Best of luck, Todd.  Please let us know how your experiments turn out.  :chef:

-ME
Let them eat pizza.

Offline spacelooper

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #696 on: August 03, 2019, 03:18:27 PM »
Gave it a whirl today. I'd call it a success. Great flavor and texture. Bubble areas soft and doughy... bottom firm and crisp. I will definitely be trying to perfect this one. I could have gotten it a tad thinner and it would have been perfect for me. Thanks for the help and info. I used your recipe and directions and for the sauce I used a slight variation of the Pizza Factory sauce... so good. I did forget to dock it which I meant to do... next time.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2019, 03:36:22 PM by spacelooper »

Offline Mad_Ernie

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #697 on: August 03, 2019, 05:18:57 PM »
That looks great Todd!  :o :drool: ^^^

By George, I think you have the hang of it! :chef:
Let them eat pizza.

Offline spacelooper

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Re: Round Table Pizza dough recipe - Part One
« Reply #698 on: August 03, 2019, 07:29:52 PM »
Thanks, Mad_Ernie. It pairs really well with the Pizza Factory sauce. I'm eager to mess with it some more. I am in major crust making mode these days :)

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