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Author Topic: A Blackstone Down Under  (Read 130503 times)

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Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #800 on: December 04, 2017, 11:42:24 AM »
Could someone explain a little more how this works? YES
Is it a working fridge YES
that can also heat NO
or is it being used a a box to contain heat? YES
Are you using it to ferment or just to warm dough for baking..or both? BOTH

 :)

In my words...

It's a regular little bar fridge, any old working fridge will do.  The brains of the operation is the temperature control unit that you see sitting on top of the fridge that in the photo reads 64.4f.  The controller has a small wired thermometer which is placed inside the fridge (it's a small cable so the door can be closed without losing too much seal).  The controller can be set to whatever temperature you like, within reason, and can also set the tolerance - i.e. how quickly it will correct when the temperature naturally strays up or down.  The controller unit is plugged into the mains, and at the back of the controller are two power outlets, one for cooling (fridge), one for heating (for me, a lamp at the bottom of the fridge - nothing fancy required).

Once that's all set up, the controller with either give power to the fridge or to the lamp depending on whether it needs to cool or heat to maintain the target temperature.

I use it for the entire process, as soon as my dough is mixed, I put it in the fridge for bulk ferment, then back in once balled.






Could someone explain a little more how this works? Is it a working fridge that can also heat, or is it being used a a box to contain heat? Are you using it to ferment or just to warm dough for baking..or both?

Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #801 on: December 04, 2017, 12:55:04 PM »
Thanks Dylan...so this is great. So to stay in those 50 and 60 degree temperature ranges, the fridge and lamp could both be on at the same time? As opposed to a fridge which may only be able to run in  the high 30's and low 40's. Guess the wild card would be bulb burnout but the new LED bulbs can probably preclude that because of long lifespan, yes? or do they generate enough heat?

Offline norcoscia

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #802 on: December 04, 2017, 01:25:46 PM »
My two cents - don't use the LED - way too good at making light and not wasting energy (by generating heat like a conventional filament bulb) - if it was me ,I would go with a conventional bulb intended for an oven - if my memory serves me right they are somewhat more hardened.
Norm

Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #803 on: December 04, 2017, 02:32:22 PM »
Thanks Norm

Offline clouseauu

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #804 on: December 04, 2017, 05:20:28 PM »
Guess the wild card would be bulb burnout

I used a reptile warming cable (like this one here) which is essentially a long resistor and thus somewhat good at generating heat.

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Offline vtsteve

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #805 on: December 05, 2017, 12:34:59 AM »
I'm thinking of using a short string of incandescent Christmas bulbs, so if one bulb blows the others will keep the temp up until I notice (it's getting into the 20's F at night, and I still have a few things in my garage fridge).

I use this Inkbird controller.
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Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #806 on: December 05, 2017, 03:49:45 AM »
The fridge and the heat source don't operate simultaneously, it tends to be one or the other depending primarily on your ambient temperature relative to target temperature.   E.g. if ambient temp is 70f and target temp is 60f the controller will typically direct power to the fridge to lower the temperature.  Once the target temperature is reached the fridge will shut off until the heat rises beyond the target temperature (plus a tolerance threshold), then the fridge will kick in again, and on it goes.  Basically the reverse if ambient temperature is lower than target temperature - the heating element typically does the work.   Occasionally if there is an overshoot there will be a correction using the opposing element.

So for 50f-60f, it will either mostly heat or cool depending on your ambient temperature, rarely both.
 

Thanks Dylan...so this is great. So to stay in those 50 and 60 degree temperature ranges, the fridge and lamp could both be on at the same time? As opposed to a fridge which may only be able to run in  the high 30's and low 40's. Guess the wild card would be bulb burnout but the new LED bulbs can probably preclude that because of long lifespan, yes? or do they generate enough heat?
« Last Edit: December 05, 2017, 04:01:47 AM by dylandylan »

Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #807 on: December 05, 2017, 03:56:19 AM »
Re: the heating element, I'm having a good run (touch wood) with the plain old tungsten filament light bulb, nice and warm and hasn't popped on me in 2 years despite a hard life.

Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #808 on: December 05, 2017, 06:39:05 AM »
Thanks Dylan..this is all good to know.


Steve, that's a great price...I've heard of that brand. Thanks

Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #809 on: December 07, 2017, 12:17:44 PM »
Aaargh and after a good practice run, my 15 doughballs for tonight are overfermenting, so they will do the last 10 hours at refrigerated temps!! 

No time to contemplate a same-day emergency dough, will wing it tonight with the cold dough.

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Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #810 on: December 08, 2017, 12:12:49 PM »
So my annual catering gig for a yoga class end-of-year celebration...

Well no dough crisis as it turned out, about 8 hours at 48f slowed things down adequately, and a couple of hours out of the fridge at about 70f prior to bake was enough to get them going again and loosen them up.  Not my finest ferment, but a long way from my worst :-)

16x 250g balls: 62%, 2.5%, .03%CY
ferment: 36hr @62f - 8hr @48f - 2hr @70f

I thought I'd try belting as many pies out in a quick production-like manner as possible, so the normal care I'd usually take went out the window but I don't think the pizza was any worse for it.   I did slightly underestimate how much cheese I would need so had to be a little frugal on that front :-(

« Last Edit: December 08, 2017, 12:21:48 PM by dylandylan »

Offline Icelandr

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #811 on: December 08, 2017, 01:16:51 PM »
Wow! Nice looking pies and LOTS! Around here that would have to be a two day event!
Like the even baking and colour.

Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #812 on: January 08, 2018, 11:57:34 PM »
A couple of quick pies using newly reactivated Ischia.  Much better than the home grown starter I had been using recently.

Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #813 on: January 09, 2018, 06:02:31 AM »
Those look great. Dylan! I'll be right over, keep mine warm  :)

Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #814 on: January 09, 2018, 08:50:38 AM »
Those are beautiful.

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Offline Obsauced

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #815 on: January 09, 2018, 09:59:33 AM »
A couple of quick pies using newly reactivated Ischia.  Much better than the home grown starter I had been using recently.

glad your're back. these look amazing!
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Offline Satyen

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #816 on: January 09, 2018, 11:22:23 AM »
Hi dylan. What is ur blackstone operation procedure?
Do u preheat at full blast, med, or 3/4?
What temp do you launch?
After launch do you keep the flame on full blast, med or 3/4?
How long is ur typical bake?
Sorry for so many questions but i would love to get a similar bake in my bs

Offline dylandylan

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #817 on: January 09, 2018, 12:06:27 PM »
Hi Satyen

Rough procedure is:
- Pre-heat the oven on a reasonably low flame - takes about 20 minute to reach 700f.  Turn the flame down to lowest so it just idles at 700 or so.
- I typically aim for 700f-750f on the bottom stone.  I don't measure the top stone or rely on the built-in temperature gaugue.
- As soon as I launch a pie I put the flame up to full.  pull the flame back down to idle after the pie is cooked.
- Most of the time, I move the pizza into the hottest zone so that more of the pie is exposed to more heat.  This does cause the bottom to cook a lot quicker too - not always desirable.

Here's an old video that that is reasonably close to what I do now in terms of oven procedure.  I do handle the dough differently/better these days.





Hi dylan. What is ur blackstone operation procedure?
Do u preheat at full blast, med, or 3/4?
What temp do you launch?
After launch do you keep the flame on full blast, med or 3/4?
How long is ur typical bake?
Sorry for so many questions but i would love to get a similar bake in my bs
« Last Edit: January 09, 2018, 12:08:30 PM by dylandylan »

Offline mmille24

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #818 on: January 11, 2018, 01:46:40 PM »
Beautiful pies.

It's interesting, that method never worked for me. If I launched at 7-750 and then blasted the heat. The bottom wouldn't be cooked enough for my liking, so you can wait, but then the cheese up top would be liquefied. What has worked best for me, was launching when the stone was 900-950, then lowering the heat to medium low. That allowed me to get the bottoms the way I wanted, without murdering the cheese up top. Your method clearly works very well, just didn't for me.


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: A Blackstone Down Under
« Reply #819 on: January 11, 2018, 01:48:55 PM »
Looking good!
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