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Author Topic: Using Buffalo Mozzarella  (Read 488 times)

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Offline jryan154

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Using Buffalo Mozzarella
« on: April 04, 2017, 12:21:16 AM »
First time using Buffalo Mozzarella tonight; it was good, but I tore pieces off from its water-filled container, and it made the pizza...watery. It didn't ruin the pizza by any means, but a few of the pieces that I tore off became very loose and messy once baked. What's the best way to combat this when using BM in my recipe? My first thought for next time would be to remove it from the container and dab it with a paper towel so some of the water dries out, but not sure if that would work or not.

Offline italdream

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Re: Using Buffalo Mozzarella
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2017, 01:02:05 PM »
First time using Buffalo Mozzarella tonight; it was good, but I tore pieces off from its water-filled container, and it made the pizza...watery. It didn't ruin the pizza by any means, but a few of the pieces that I tore off became very loose and messy once baked. What's the best way to combat this when using BM in my recipe? My first thought for next time would be to remove it from the container and dab it with a paper towel so some of the water dries out, but not sure if that would work or not.
I love buffalo mozzarella and I like it on pizza. But bear in mind that most pizzaioli use regular mozzarella (fior di latte), except for some special piers on the menu or where customer request BF. That is to say, BF is by its own nature more watery and many prefer fior di latte (I don't).

With that in mind, take out the BF from its container 2 or 3 hours before baking pizza. Place in a plate (no paper plate), and cover the plate with plastic wrap. The mozzarella will naturally release water on the plate. Discharge the water a couple of times.
You then cut the mozzarella it a few minutes before using it on the pizza. You could squeeze it a little bit before placing it on the pie to release some extra water content. Bake and enjoy!
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Using Buffalo Mozzarella
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2017, 01:58:07 PM »
The buffalo mozz that makes it to Houston is pretty waterlogged by the time it gets here. I take the balls, cut them in half and drain them cut side down on 4-5 layers of paper towels for 2-6 hours depending on the age of the cheese (the older the more waterlogged and the longer the drain needed).  Even then, it can make for a wet pizza. That all being said, I'd never use anything else on NP if it wasn't a pain in the arse for me to get.
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Offline Qarl

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Re: Using Buffalo Mozzarella
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2017, 02:38:08 PM »
What others have said above...   :chef:

BM usually comes floating in the whey or brine... It is often water logged and has a higher moisture content.  Drain on a plate or paper towels. 

I also tear into pieces and place on a paper towel.  And then just grap pieces when I'm dressing the skin with sauce and cheese.

Many Costco's carry BM in the fresh cheeses department.  ITEM number is 709616

You can call a local Costco and see if any in the area have it in stock.  Usually $11.79 (or so) for 4 125g balls.

This stuff tastes great and works well if drained properly!

Offline JSPACEMAN

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Re: Using Buffalo Mozzarella
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2017, 02:08:02 AM »
I am no expert, but I usually squeeze it in my hands :chef:

It works well enough for me.
I think I'm in love, probably just hungry.

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Offline italdream

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Re: Using Buffalo Mozzarella
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2017, 10:15:49 AM »
I'd like to add a couple of things about buffallo mozzarella, one of my other food obsessions since I grew up not far from the various production areas.

In Italy, you will find subtle but detectable differences between the various production areas, Batipaglia for example on the Salerno part, and Aversa/Grazzanise etc. on the Caserta part, two comparable yet different animals.

In the States, we do not enjoy any of that. This topic has been discussed before but the main culprit IMHO is pasteurization. Under European law, mozzarella milk undergoes a process that is called thermization, a method for sanitizing raw milk with low heat that is useful for partial removing of pathogens, while keeping the good bacteria flora in (see Wikipedia). Buffalo mozzarella for US export undergoes pasteurization, which destroys most of the bacteria, the good and bad alike.

It matters to us pizzamakers especially for the following reason. One consequence of pasteurization is longer shelf life, up to 15-20 days, while Italian mozzarella needs to be consumed fresh (2 days max) and is best enjoyed if kept at room temperature, without refrigeration. When U.S. imported mozzarella stays in water for weeks at a time, it gets oversaturated with water and loses its characteristic texture. This makes the product even more watery that it would otherwise be.

When I buy buffalo mozzarella in the U.S., I always make sure that the batch has at least 10 days left on its expiration date, meaning that it has been approximately a week in water. Costco often times carries sequential batches, if you look in the back, you could find fresher mozzarella with almost 20 days of remaining shelf life. Longer expiration days translates in better texture and less water.

« Last Edit: April 05, 2017, 10:23:27 AM by italdream »
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Offline italdream

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Re: Using Buffalo Mozzarella
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2017, 10:21:47 AM »
This stuff tastes great and works well if drained properly!

Not trying to split hair. In my experience, it is preferable to avoid using a strainer for extended periods of time because when mozzarella is taken outside of water and exposed to air, it will develop a mild yellow-y film/ almost a dry crust.

Kept in a plate and "sealed" through plastic wrap allows it to release extra watery content while not developing a dry yellow surface.
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Offline FranksPizza

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Re: Using Buffalo Mozzarella
« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2017, 05:53:34 PM »
I'm new to this and found Buf at Whole Foods today, but did not buy it because it was $22.99 per pound, and half of it was water.  Good to know that Costco carries it for about half the price.  For this batch, I'll use locally made fresh Mozzarella which is dry and only $10 per pound

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