A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: Article on Yeast  (Read 374 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 26329
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Article on Yeast
« on: February 14, 2017, 11:47:51 AM »
Our members frequently deal with yeast issues in their dough formulations. Here is an interesting article on what the yeast producers have been up to with their yeast products:

http://www.bakingbusiness.com/Features/Formulations/2016/12/Getting-creative-with-yeast.aspx

Peter

Online norcoscia

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1569
  • Location: WA
  • I really Love Pizza!
Re: Article on Yeast
« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2017, 12:11:17 PM »
I don't understand how they can mix frozen dough, I must be misunderstanding something?
Norm

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 26329
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Article on Yeast
« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2017, 02:19:52 PM »
I don't understand how they can mix frozen dough, I must be misunderstanding something?
Norm,

The preparation of frozen dough in a home setting is in an entirely different league than the commercial production of frozen dough. So, yeast producers have developed strains of yeast that benefit commercial producers of frozen dough.

Peter

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 28066
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
  • Always working and looking for new information!
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: Article on Yeast
« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2017, 08:25:34 PM »
Peter,

Interesting article!

Norma

Offline jsaras

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1987
  • Location: Northridge, CA
Re: Article on Yeast
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2017, 12:18:29 AM »
I've forgotten what little I knew about microbiology, but I'm beginning to dabble with wine making and there are MANY varieties of dry commercial yeasts available to wine makers.  The wine maker chooses the yeast strain to get certain flavor characteristics as they all interact with the varietals differently.  Given that, I wonder why bakers yeast is limited to a single, non-descript strain.  It would seem to me that it should be possible to create ADY versions of various sourdough organisms.
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


 

A D V E R T I S E M E N T