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Author Topic: Fermentation flavors from 00  (Read 610 times)

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Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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Fermentation flavors from 00
« on: February 22, 2016, 06:41:19 AM »
Hi guys,

Based on on last night's bake, I'm wondering if I'm right that perhaps 00 and malted flours ferment differently.

The pies were good but the crust flavor didn't have the depth I expected after a 4 day CF. The dough was 1/3 AT (all AT in poolish) , 2/3 00 (Anna), .4% IDY . Looking at some past bake notes, I see that before I've done this mix 5 day CF with what I noted as excellent taste, and also a variety of combo RT/CF's, also which I really liked. So...is it true that the 00 just needs more CF time or at least a good amount of RT to develop the flavors I might be looking for...ie the complexity   I expect (more quickly) from a malted flour?

Or do I need to blow the dust off my dunce cap again and go sit in the corner eating less-than-optimal pizza?  :-[

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Fermentation flavors from 00
« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2016, 08:10:04 AM »
I don't think there is any question they ferment differently (in this case, "perform" bay be a better choice of words as enzymes are playing a key role as well) which is why I highlighted it in the Fermentation: a science-based look suggests RT is better for flavor post:

α-amylase is only found in grain that has begun to sprout, and it accumulates rapidly after sprouting starts. β-amylase is found un-sprouted grains and does not increase much after sprouting. Both are activated by water. Enzyme (amylase) activity in flour is typically reported as the “falling number.” Typical malted bread flour might have a falling number of 220-250. Unmalted flours such as ‘00’ used for Neapolitan pizza have much less enzymatic activity and are much higher. Caputo Pizzeria, for example, is 340-360. The higher the number, the lower the enzyme activity. Low enzyme activity is typically adjusted by the addition of malted barley which is high in α-amylase.(29)   This is what we call “malted flour.”

Using the activation energy figure for wheat α or β-amylase and the Arrhenius equation, it is a simple matter to calculate the difference in activity between CF (at 3C/37F) and RT (at 19C/66F) to be ~3-4X meaning that dough would need to be held at 3C for up to four times as long as at 19C to convert a similar amount of starch to sugars (30, 31).   The relationship for other enzymes in the dough is similar.

Enzyme activity is also a function of concentration: all other things being equal, more enzymes = more activity. Perhaps when using malted flour with its added α-amylase, it doesn’t make as much difference if you CF or RT, however, with the low enzyme activity of the unmalted flour used in Neapolitan dough, the importance of optimizing temperature is certainly heightened.

My personal belief is that (at least for Neapolitan pizza), when using unmalted flour, CF CAN NOT make a dough with either flavor or texture characteristics that match that of well executed RT dough.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Re: Fermentation flavors from 00
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2016, 09:00:29 AM »
Am I right in thinking that in Naples just about every pizzeria uses RT fermentation with the dough being started in the morning for that day's pies?

Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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Re: Fermentation flavors from 00
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2016, 09:22:46 AM »
Thank you, Craig. Well, I appear to be the example that illustrates your notes...the difference was not subtle, it was dramatic. 

 I'd like to think my tastebuds are pretty discerning at this point..and I can say with malted flours, I can't notice much difference between a long CF and an RT, though my "experiments" aren't scientifically reliable, I'd really have to taste side by side pizzas and I don't recall that I have. ..I just do my best to make good tasting pizza.  With even 2/3 of this dough being 00, however, the difference between earlier versions that had at least some RT  was quite pronounced .

Tin, when I've made doughs that are 00 only, ie, my version of NP, I've only used RT...Now I guess I know why. It would be interesting to see at what ratio 00:Malted, the differences became more , or less apparent.   I think next time I  use some 00 in my dough at any percentage, I'll be sure to have at least some RT in the equation. I could run a CF out 5 days or longer, but not really sure how the dough would hold up...and since RT was the only way I used to make dough, I don't think using it will be any problem for me.

 
« Last Edit: February 22, 2016, 09:26:49 AM by Jersey Pie Boy »

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