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Author Topic: peels  (Read 2744 times)

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Offline the1mu

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Re: peels
« Reply #20 on: March 24, 2016, 08:26:27 PM »

I'm going to be honest, I have not read through this entire thread but I did see the last few posts - and for what it is worth, I'll let you know what I did with some peels a few years back.

Before I do, I want to say I have one peel I have been using for over 20 years and I have never oiled it - it is still fine. I have sanded it and reshaped the peel -- but I have never oiled it.

OK, a few years ago I purchased a larger peel to try to make the biggest pie I could fit in the oven of my last home. I ordered a cheap one and when I got it one side had a bad knot / divot in it. After using the good side I decided to try to go bigger and picked up another peel (just a bit larger) besides, I did not like the one with the knot anyway. When the second one came in I had near identical peels so I decide to run a test. I sanded them both down with fine sandpaper (which is almost always a good idea - they get slicker). With them both freshly sanded and exactly the same I oiled one and left the other as is.

I made a few pies with both and in my opinion the oiled one seemed to drag a bit more than the other (which was just sanded). I have never oiled another peel.

OK so, maybe not scientific but enough for me to just say no to oil on my peels. Maybe different wood (or climates) would make the peel behave differently but for the standard peel I tested - un-oiled was the clear winner. 

Did I mention I have a peel that is over 20 years old and never oiled - to be honest, it might be over 30 years old....

So that is it - just my experience with peels and oil - only passing it along as FYI in case anyone is interested - good luck with whatever you try....

That is exactly the type of opinion I was hoping to read! What grit sandpaper do you recommend using?

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: peels
« Reply #21 on: March 24, 2016, 08:43:40 PM »
I was recently at an Ace Hardware store near my son's home in Olathe, KS, and guess what I found hanging by their selection of BBQ tools? Yep, wood pizza peels (only 12"), but if you're looking for a 12" wood peel you might be able to pick one up at your local Ace Hardware. BTW: There peels are identical to those sold at <mrpeel.com>
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline barryvabeach

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Re: peels
« Reply #22 on: March 24, 2016, 08:52:38 PM »
IMO, as long as you keep the peel dry,  you won't need any oil, and the higher the grit you use, the smoother it will be and the easier for the pie to release.  If the peel gets wet,  very small fibers will swell up, and they will be like thorns ,  so you will want to wait till it is completely dry, and smooth them off with a very light sanding -  either 400 grit or higher, or a brown paper bag - which is similar to a very high grit sandpaper

Offline the1mu

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Re: peels
« Reply #23 on: March 24, 2016, 09:09:16 PM »

IMO, as long as you keep the peel dry,  you won't need any oil, and the higher the grit you use, the smoother it will be and the easier for the pie to release.  If the peel gets wet,  very small fibers will swell up, and they will be like thorns ,  so you will want to wait till it is completely dry, and smooth them off with a very light sanding -  either 400 grit or higher, or a brown paper bag - which is similar to a very high grit sandpaper

First time I tried was with 2000 grit. It didn't seem to do anything. So I was gonna try with lower and then move up!

Offline barryvabeach

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Re: peels
« Reply #24 on: March 24, 2016, 09:10:14 PM »
Start with 150 then progress up from there. 

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Offline norcoscia

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Re: peels
« Reply #25 on: March 25, 2016, 08:01:10 AM »
Yes - I start with something near 140-180 then I go finer - I think anything past 500 is a waist of time - you may even have a hard time finding anything over 240 that is intended to be used on wood (I think I found something in the 400s.) I don't use the black paper because I'm not sure it is OK for use on wood (at least not the kind my food will be on) but I'm not 100% sure about that.

I used an electric vibrating sander - it goes much quicker - after I sand I wipe it off with a dry cloth - then a cloth that is just a very tiny tiny bit damp (you alway want the peel to stay as dry a possible). Then dry wipe again and add some flour and you are ready to go - have fun....
Norm

Offline the1mu

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Re: peels
« Reply #26 on: March 25, 2016, 08:05:12 AM »

Yes - I start with something near 140-180 then I go finer - I think anything past 500 is a waist of time - you may even have a hard time finding anything over 240 that is intended to be used on wood (I think I found something in the 400s.) I don't use the black paper because I'm not sure it is OK for use on wood (at least not the kind my food will be on) but I'm not 100% sure about that.

I used an electric vibrating sander - it goes much quicker - after I sand I wipe it off with a dry cloth - then a cloth that is just a very tiny tiny bit damp (you alway want the peel to stay as dry a possible). Then dry wipe again and add some flour and you are ready to go - have fun....

Thanks!

Offline norfbech

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Re: peels
« Reply #27 on: March 25, 2016, 09:22:50 AM »
Good points about the fine sanding.
I'll do the same with mine this weekend.  Never occurred to me that the grain might affect the launch.  I did a coarse rub with an orbital sander then oiled, but this was to make the gradient and get rid of the original 'varnish'.  I think I need to make the gradient less steep anyway so I'll do that again then a very fine sand rub.
That mineral oil is too expensive to keep rubbing on the peel and it sounds like there's no need.
I'll just use it on my slates.

Cheers.

Offline Fungi

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Re: peels
« Reply #28 on: June 17, 2016, 12:42:19 AM »
I like the wood peel to launch and the metal GI to take the pizza off the stone.
This is the way we did it at Cara's, back in the day.
We could prep two pizzas on the wooden peel and drop them off, one at a time, to specific spots on the deck oven.
[It was all in the wrist ... well, that and the rice-flour we put down on the peel before stretching the dough.]
But we checked the pies and took them out one at a time with a metal peel. 

I had no say in this process.  It was just, "This is how we do it, kid."

Offline oronzous

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Re: peels
« Reply #29 on: August 05, 2016, 09:53:32 AM »
I have NO experience sanding a peel, but i have a couple of doubts:

Isn't a too-fine sanding counter productive?  it increases the contact surface between wood and dough.
Also i would forgo orbital and sand only in the direction of sliding.



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Offline enchant

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Re: peels
« Reply #30 on: August 05, 2016, 10:19:49 AM »
I don't think there is any actual contact between the dough and the peel.  It's rolling around on a bed of tiny ball bearings.
--pat--

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: peels
« Reply #31 on: August 05, 2016, 12:43:43 PM »
I don't think there is any actual contact between the dough and the peel.  It's rolling around on a bed of tiny ball bearings.

While in many cases that may be a good description of what is happening, I'm not sure it is always the case, and think the farther you get from it the better. There is no amount of bench flour that is a good thing with respect to the quality of the finished pizza.
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Offline norcoscia

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Re: peels
« Reply #32 on: August 05, 2016, 12:59:17 PM »
I have NO experience sanding a peel, but i have a couple of doubts:

Isn't a too-fine sanding counter productive?  it increases the contact surface between wood and dough.
Also i would forgo orbital and sand only in the direction of sliding.

That is an interesting way to look at it, I wonder if anyone has any actual test data - I only have my experience - I see it more like a polished surface being slicker and an un-sanded surface acting more like velcro.

But like I said - I have no official data / study - you could do what I did and try it for yourself - start with 36 grit and sand in the direction of travel make deep groves - make a pie (don't forget to check for splinters) - then take the same board and sand with 80 grit then 120 then, then 220 and finally 360. Then make another pie.... let us know what happens.
Norm

Offline the1mu

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Re: peels
« Reply #33 on: August 05, 2016, 09:19:43 PM »
That is an interesting way to look at it, I wonder if anyone has any actual test data - I only have my experience - I see it more like a polished surface being slicker and an un-sanded surface acting more like velcro.

But like I said - I have no official data / study - you could do what I did and try it for yourself - start with 36 grit and sand in the direction of travel make deep groves - make a pie (don't forget to check for splinters) - then take the same board and sand with 80 grit then 120 then, then 220 and finally 360. Then make another pie.... let us know what happens.


This has been my experience as well. When I freshly sand a peel, the dough seems to slip around much more than when it was rough.

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