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Author Topic: Pizza oven heat retention  (Read 331 times)

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Offline csansonetti

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Pizza oven heat retention
« on: February 06, 2017, 02:59:14 AM »
Hi all,

I finally finished building my pizza oven and now I am curing it. I wanted to ask if there was a good metric to determine whether my oven is insulated well and the heat is well retained .

I placed an oven thermometer inside the oven and today it reached the temperature of 350F. After maybe 30 minutes after I let the wood burn off, it got down to 220F. Today it was overcast with an outside temperature of roughly 55F

Something we didn't do in the construction is to place an insulation under the cooking bricks. So they sit on top of a 4 inch concrete slab.

Any thought would really help.

Thanks!


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Pizza oven heat retention
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2017, 07:08:21 AM »
Lots of ways to approach this, but I simply place my hand on the outside top of the dome. If yours is at all warm to the touch, then you are losing some heat through the insulation. Heat loss over time after the fire goes out will also depend on the size of the residual coal bed and the amount of oxygen available to it, etc.

Others might chime in here to give you their experiences with their ovens, but I have never detected any warmth on the dome surface. Overnight (opening covered) drops from around 900F to 500F (perfect for baking bread).   

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Pizza oven heat retention
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2017, 10:26:02 AM »
I placed an oven thermometer inside the oven and today it reached the temperature of 350F. After maybe 30 minutes after I let the wood burn off, it got down to 220F.

If you didn't fire the oven long enough to fully saturate it with heat, the temperature drop in the center of the oven may have been due to heat moving deeper into the mass.

The only metric that really matters at this point is if the oven works for you or not, and there is only one way to test that.
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Offline csansonetti

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Re: Pizza oven heat retention
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2017, 07:51:49 PM »
Thanks for the quick replies!

Yes, I can't wait to be able to bring the oven at temperature and see how it performs.
I did do a test today and I measured the temperature of the inside walls of the oven and it got to 450F, then after maybe an hour or 2 I checked the temperature of the bottom of the oven (right above the area where I store the wood) and it got as high as 120F!

Should I be worried? Besides the heat loss, but is it normal that so much heat is going through the concrete slab?

Thanks!


Offline vtsteve

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Re: Pizza oven heat retention
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2017, 12:15:42 AM »
Something we didn't do in the construction is to place an insulation under the cooking bricks. So they sit on top of a 4 inch concrete slab.

I checked the temperature of the bottom of the oven (right above the area where I store the wood) and it got as high as 120F!

Should I be worried? Besides the heat loss, but is it normal that so much heat is going through the concrete slab?


It's not great...
You're probably not going to fire it enough to decompose/collapse the slab, but it complicates your heat management.

If you're planning to do long sessions, or plan to bake bread, you should fix it.

Most oven instructions call for insulation between the structural slab and the dome/floor bricks. If you can remove the floor, it's possible to place insulation inside the dome walls, and re-lay the floor. Calcium silicate is one of the best materials for under-floor insulation (especially if you're building the dome on it).

If it will only be supporting the floor, you can use one of the fiber boards like Insblock 19 or possibly the Roxul rockwool board.

That will get you much of the benefit, although heat will still bleed down from the edges where the dome contacts the slab.
Some members here have demolished and rebuild their under-insulated ovens.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2017, 12:17:53 AM by vtsteve »
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Offline breadstoneovens

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Re: Pizza oven heat retention
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2017, 01:59:05 PM »
Measuring the temperature in the cooking chamber with and without the fire is not ideal as the oven can be still in the heating process.

Also it sounds like your oven is brand new and you are still in the curing process? All the moistures coming out of the materials will transfer the heat faster to the outside, due to the water heat conductivity. And the water coming out will also speed up the cooling process.

Therefore it is hard to gauge any potential problems at this point.

Do you have pictures or a good description of how you built the oven with insulation materials and thickness?
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