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Author Topic: Fried Dough  (Read 407 times)

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Offline ATM

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Fried Dough
« on: April 21, 2017, 06:32:06 AM »
I'm Looking for a dough I can mix and use right away. I have used pizza dough in the past and have been very happy with the results and flavor. Problem is I don't have the time to allow it to proof. Is it possible to make it and use it or am I going to have to wait for it to rise a bit first? Any thought or suggestions ?  thanks in advance for your help

Offline Rolls

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Re: Fried Dough
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2017, 10:24:05 AM »
"Fried dough" can include a very broad range of products. Can you be more specific about what you are trying to achieve? Generally, yeasted products require some measure of proofing time.  Otherwise, you should look at recipes that use chemical leaveners.


Rolls

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Fried Dough
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2017, 10:59:34 AM »
An emergency type dough is your best bet for a relatively decent pizza in short order but you're still looking at around 2.5-hours from mixing bowl to table. It is possible to make a fried pizza dough (think Celeste) in about an hour from mixing bowl to table. You will not have any option as to the type of crust that you are going to make as it will be just a "fried crust". Take any pizza dough formula, adjust the dough absorption to give a nice supple but not sticky dough in the mixing bowl (normally around 62% but this will vary with flour and formulation). Adjust the water temperature to give you a dough between 85 and 90F (about 95F water). The yeast level should be doubled. Mix to a smooth dough, immediately scale and ball, lightly oil the dough balls and set aside to proof for 30-minutes but not more than 45-minutes, roll the dough out using a rolling pin or open it by hand (NOTE: Don't open the dough ball into a skin larger than what you are going to fry it in/frying pan). Once the dough is opened set it aside to proof for about 15-minutes (a pizza screen works well for this). Fry the dough in a frying pan with a good amount of oil (345 to 365F). Fry on one side and watch for it to begin bubbling then flip it over to fry on the other side until lightly brown in color, turn it once again to get the desired color and place onto towel to drain. While still hot place onto a screen and dress the pizza as desired, place back into 475F oven to finish baking. We did these all the time when fried crusts were all the rage. They're hard to get by the "food police" these days.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline ATM

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Re: Fried Dough
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2017, 08:12:47 AM »
thanks for the great info ..... Im talking fried dough like you get at the fair  and lots of it we are going to be selling it at events and festivals

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Fried Dough
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2017, 02:42:53 PM »
Better get a donut fryer with a submersion screen.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: Fried Dough
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2017, 02:54:08 PM »
Not exactly on topic, but an idea,. Personally, I like funnel cakes with powdered sugar better than fried dough. I don't believe the funnel cake batter needs any time to rise. If you were looking for savory with a tomato based sauce, the fried dough is the way to go. If it's dessert, funnel cake might be easier...although I've never done anything commercial, so I could be very wrong on the easier part.

Offline ATM

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Re: Fried Dough
« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2017, 05:49:11 AM »
We have a fryer made for frying funnel cakes, we prefer fried dough and it seems to sell better in our area.

Offline Loarina Vega

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Re: Fried Dough
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2017, 03:29:36 AM »
I am currently in the process of starting my fried dough business Lori V's fried Delights I am aspiring outdoor concessionaire I have various things that I mix with the fried dough my best choices are some sort of a milk product would be powder dry milk or regular milk or dash of sour cream...i  use Diastic malt sometimes I have used a malt beverage called Malta from Goya products a dash of extra sugar works well I still keep a dash of extra sugar even for the savory fried dough pizza xcetera I have added garlic powder I add any salt  to the last process of mixing dough  cuz it would  destroy the yeast Rising process to the Savory Italian fried dough pizzas of course I keep the garlic away from the ones that I make with cinnamon sugar powdered sugar
« Last Edit: April 25, 2017, 03:42:52 AM by Loarina Vega »

Offline Loarina Vega

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Re: Fried Dough
« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2017, 03:50:06 AM »
We have a fryer made for frying funnel cakes, we prefer fried dough and it seems to sell better in our area.
   

I Bought A STAR. 650Ff gas it only fits tthree fried dough at a time ..... would you be interested in helping me on some tips on how you had yours made if you could private message me or email some details ....I'm out of York PA

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