Author Topic: Oil For Use in Various Styles Using Pans  (Read 158 times)

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Offline rparker

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Oil For Use in Various Styles Using Pans
« on: January 16, 2017, 09:21:38 AM »
Are there any general rules or guidelines for choosing oils to use when baking various styles of pan pizza? Are there any beware of brand-X for this use, or use brand-Y for that use type of suggestions? Anything to beware of, such as certain cheap generics or types? Anything in the labeling to watch for?

I know it's suggested to use Corn Oil for Chicago DD, Olive Oil for Sicilian and Vegetable Oil for American Pan (something like Pizza Hit Pan Pizza). I've seen and used both Crisco and Olive Oil for Detroit. There are probably a lot more examples than I've listed. Anyone have a certain brand(s) that you swear by for any of what I listed or other types I didn't?

Thanks,

Roy

 

Offline jsaras

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Re: Oil For Use in Various Styles Using Pans
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2017, 09:41:37 AM »
I've had terrific results with grapeseed oil and avocado oil in pans.  Both have high smoke points.  I really like avocado oil in dough at about 1%. 
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline rparker

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Re: Oil For Use in Various Styles Using Pans
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2017, 10:30:17 AM »
I've had terrific results with grapeseed oil and avocado oil in pans.  Both have high smoke points.  I really like avocado oil in dough at about 1%.
Jonas, I think you just gave me the final excuse I was waiting for me to reach up for the Avocado oil on the grocery house. IIRC, the grapeseed oil was right beside it. Wifeypoo doesn't give me any grief about any of this experimental purchases. Something about being infinitely cheaper than music gear.  ;D  Oh, and the actual tests themselves can be yummy.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Oil For Use in Various Styles Using Pans
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2017, 04:30:51 PM »
Peanut oil is also quite good, but for Chicago style pizzas where Blue Bonnet margarine used to be the "gold standard" I like to use Butter Flavored Crisco.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline rparker

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Re: Oil For Use in Various Styles Using Pans
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2017, 05:18:56 PM »
Peanut oil is also quite good, but for Chicago style pizzas where Blue Bonnet margarine used to be the "gold standard" I like to use Butter Flavored Crisco.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor
Thanks, Tom!

Did Blue Bonnet change like so many things have, or did butter flavored Crisco just plain win out?

Roy

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Oil For Use in Various Styles Using Pans
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2017, 05:25:59 PM »
I don't even know if BB margarine is made anymore or not. BFC is awfully hard to beat as a substitute.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor


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Re: Oil For Use in Various Styles Using Pans
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2017, 05:39:08 PM »
My biggest complaint with margarine is the amount of water.  We used to only have margarine and no butter in the house, mostly for breakfast toast (now it's completely opposite).  Trying to cook the margarine down to just the butter flavored oil was a task!  So much water to boil off.  For cooking, I love butter flavored crisco.  I use it in my buttermilk biscuits in place of regular shortening and it's a winner for butter flavor.

Offline jsaras

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Re: Oil For Use in Various Styles Using Pans
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2017, 07:46:28 PM »
Jonas, I think you just gave me the final excuse I was waiting for me to reach up for the Avocado oil on the grocery house. IIRC, the grapeseed oil was right beside it. Wifeypoo doesn't give me any grief about any of this experimental purchases. Something about being infinitely cheaper than music gear.  ;D  Oh, and the actual tests themselves can be yummy.

At least in Southern California, avocado oil is readily available at Costco and Trader Joes.  It can be used as a direct substitute for butter in baking.

Grapeseed oil is my go-to for cooking anything on a pan.  It's flavorless and has a high smoke point.  Canola oil tastes awful IMO and cheap olive oils have awful stale odors.  When cooking/frying I just want the flavor of the food to come through.
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline rparker

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Re: Oil For Use in Various Styles Using Pans
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2017, 09:42:52 PM »
I was switching back and forth between regular Olive Oil and Vegetable Oil in my pizza dough. I guess I stuck with one at random just to be consistent and have not tried the other in months.

This pan pizza (Detroit, PH, Sicilian, etc) thing is all very new to me in the past year. I was not overwhelmed by the vegetable oil for the PH attempt recently. The butter flavored Crisco for the Detroiters I've done have been much yum yum.  I did have good luck with Chicago Deep Dish last year with one of the corn oils, but I forgot which one it was. I bought the big jug of Mazola this past weekend. I hope it's the right one.

At least in Southern California, avocado oil is readily available at Costco and Trader Joes.  It can be used as a direct substitute for butter in baking.

Grapeseed oil is my go-to for cooking anything on a pan.  It's flavorless and has a high smoke point.  Canola oil tastes awful IMO and cheap olive oils have awful stale odors.  When cooking/frying I just want the flavor of the food to come through.
I had a few less than wonderful results with Canola and Peanut oil and switched to vegetable oil as a result. It's almost like the peanut oil changed overnight. The Canola was good riddance. Oddly enough, Peanut oil used to be everywhere on the shelves. I think our local grocery now only has one private label entry.

I also wonder if generic vegetable oils are not as good somehow as name-brands. I never really paid much attention to it all until the past few years.