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Author Topic: Final proof time for pan pizzas (working on Roman al taglio)  (Read 160 times)

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Offline Oberon

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Been experimenting a bunch, and reading Vetri, Reinhart, and Brohner and the local dough doc. on Roman al taglio dough and pan pizzas, and there is a pretty wide range of methods for the final rise (after the dough is in the pan)...from stretch/dimple and into the oven, to 45 min. in the pan before baking.

Insights, opinions and observations on how final proof time affects the outcome???

Thanks much...

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Final proof time for pan pizzas (working on Roman al taglio)
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2019, 12:17:37 AM »
The length of proof time will depend on a number of things such as dough temperature, amount of yeast used in the dough, amount of salt used in the dough, room temperature, dough absorption and to some extent the use of fat in the dough as well as the total dough absorption and flour strength. My advice has always been to proof the dough in the pan sufficiently to give you the desired volume/height and crumb structure characteristics that you are looking for. In most cases this time will fall somewhere between 45 and 75-minutes, but in some pizzerias where the dough will be placed in the cooler for storage for use later in the day the final proofing time can be as short as 20 or 30-minutes outside of the cooler, but keep in mind that the dough will continue to proof, to a more limited extent, in the cooler to in reality the final proof time is longer than 20 or 30-minutes.

Offline amolapizza

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Re: Final proof time for pan pizzas (working on Roman al taglio)
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2019, 04:38:04 AM »
I've been to 2 Italian courses for making pizza in teglia/pala alla romana.

There are so many different ways to make pizza and the nomenclature differs between countries and even Italian regions.  Italians in general seem to call it a pizza if it's proofed outside of the pan and foccacia if it proofs in the pan.  Note that this might be contested by some, but.. :)

I've been taught to use high hydration (75-80%), a stronger flour (higher protein) and 24/48 hours of fridge maturation.  When the dough is taken out of the fridge it gets some S/F and is then formed into a rectangular panetto.  It's then  left to rise again for approximately 4 hours, then extended on top of semolina and transferred to the teglia to be cooked (or pre cooked) immediately.

One can also transfer the extended dough to a peal and bake it directly on the stone and like that it becomes a pizza alla pala.

Another very nice trick is to precook it, then slice it in half and warm both pieces up again on the stone and place the fillings inbetween the 2 parts.  Gives a nice crunch to the pizza.

This type of pizza IMO is super good and the creativity in use of toppings is mind blowing.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2019, 04:40:51 AM by amolapizza »
Effeuno P134H (1700W upper element), EGO 500C Thermostat (upper), Biscotto Fornace Saputo, Sunmix Sun6, Caputo Pizzeria (Blue Bag), Mutti S. Marzano (DOP) :)

Offline Oberon

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Re: Final proof time for pan pizzas (working on Roman al taglio)
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2019, 02:38:30 PM »
trying to zero in on the question...I'm not looking for proofing times as much insights into what difference it makes to have more or less proofing in the pan it will be baked in after final shape/extension (vs. prior to final shaping, in whatever contain that is).
 
amolapizza and dough dr. illustrate the contrast in approaches...so why follow one vs the other?

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Final proof time for pan pizzas (working on Roman al taglio)
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2019, 02:49:36 PM »
By allowing the dough to proof for a longer time in the pan immediately prior to baking will impart a more open, porous crumb structure to the finished crust.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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