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Author Topic: Reducing Chewiness in Pizza  (Read 670 times)

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Offline hotsawce

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Reducing Chewiness in Pizza
« on: October 17, 2018, 04:06:49 PM »
Iíve been making some pizzas using the commercial equivalent of King Arthur Bread Flour and no matter the baking time or temp I always seem to get a chewy pizza - very bread like. Iím wondering if anyone has any idea whatís causing that. Could it just be the protein content in the flour?

Interestingly, Joeís uses all trumps with a much higher protein content and, to my tastes, the pizza is much less chewy

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Reducing Chewiness in Pizza
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2018, 04:14:25 PM »
It would help for us to see your dough formula and dough management procedure. For starters, the key to achieving a more tender eating crust is in the amount of fermentation the dough receives as well as the oil content of the dough.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline hotsawce

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Re: Reducing Chewiness in Pizza
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2018, 04:28:28 PM »
This is in a very basic home formula I use with poor results. I have not increased hydration for this reason.

100% KABF
60% cool water
1.75% salt
2% oil added after rest*
0.35% fresh yeast

Dissolve everything in water, rest, mix until smooth, ball and proof until 85 to 90% of the way, then fridge and hold.

Not only has the pizza been tough, on occasion the dough is surprisingly sticky at this hydration and I'm very confused as to why that is. Especially when it hits room temp - sucks up flour and feels much wetter than it actually is (I wonder if that's the low amount of salt?)

Generally, the dough is at a point where it is not so tough it that it is elastic or difficult to open, but it is also not so soft that it feels slack or takes on amoeba shapes. I always take my dough to a point that it is easy to open without much effort, well proofed, but holds its shape well.

It would help for us to see your dough formula and dough management procedure. For starters, the key to achieving a more tender eating crust is in the amount of fermentation the dough receives as well as the oil content of the dough.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor
« Last Edit: October 17, 2018, 04:33:09 PM by hotsawce »

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Reducing Chewiness in Pizza
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2018, 07:33:03 PM »
Really need more of the blank spaces to be filled in.
Hand or machine mixing? If machine for how long?
Finished dough temperature:
Ball and proof until 85 to 90% of the way; Where? :) Can you provide a time?
Then fridge and hold (for how long?) Do you cross-stack/leave container open or is it closed right away?
After removing the dough ball(s) from the fridge what do you do?
Your salt level is fine.
One last thing, you say on occasion the dough is surprisingly sticky. Where/when during the process did you make that assessment?
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline hotsawce

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Re: Reducing Chewiness in Pizza
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2018, 10:07:38 AM »
Machine mix about 8 minutes. Dissolve salt and yeast in water. Add flour. Mix until incorporated. (1 to 2 minutes) Rest 30 minutes. Begin mixing (3 or 4 minutes.) Add oil and mix until smooth (another 2 to 3 minutes.) Total mix is around 8 minutes with a 12.7% protein flour. Rest 20 to 30 minutes then cut, scale, ball. Final dough temp usually around 73 to 75f.

Proof at room temp until well proofed (eyeball and experience test, here.) Sometimes it's 3 or 4 hours. Then left uncovered for 15 to 20 minutes, covered, and fridged. (I've left uncovered room temp and in fridge both are better than covering right away.)

Dough is surprisingly sticky at times when I go to make the pizza.



Really need more of the blank spaces to be filled in.
Hand or machine mixing? If machine for how long?
Finished dough temperature:
Ball and proof until 85 to 90% of the way; Where? :) Can you provide a time?
Then fridge and hold (for how long?) Do you cross-stack/leave container open or is it closed right away?
After removing the dough ball(s) from the fridge what do you do?
Your salt level is fine.
One last thing, you say on occasion the dough is surprisingly sticky. Where/when during the process did you make that assessment?
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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Offline Heikjo

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Re: Reducing Chewiness in Pizza
« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2018, 10:30:29 AM »
Machine mix about 8 minutes. Dissolve salt and yeast in water. Add flour. Mix until incorporated. (1 to 2 minutes) Rest 30 minutes. Begin mixing (3 or 4 minutes.) Add oil and mix until smooth (another 2 to 3 minutes.) Total mix is around 8 minutes with a 12.7% protein flour. Rest 20 to 30 minutes then cut, scale, ball. Final dough temp usually around 73 to 75f.

Proof at room temp until well proofed (eyeball and experience test, here.) Sometimes it's 3 or 4 hours. Then left uncovered for 15 to 20 minutes, covered, and fridged. (I've left uncovered room temp and in fridge both are better than covering right away.)

Dough is surprisingly sticky at times when I go to make the pizza.
What happens after you put it in the fridge? How long does it sit there? What temperature is your fridge? Does it keep expanding in the fridge? What do you do after it's been in the fridge? Does it warm up on the bench? For how long?
-Heine. Mostly Neapolitan sourdough pizzas in an electric Effeuno P134H.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Reducing Chewiness in Pizza
« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2018, 10:52:54 AM »
Try leaving the dough uncovered for AT LEAST 2-hours after placing it in the fridge (lightly oil the dough ball to prevent any drying while its uncovered in the fridge). To me it sounds like you're getting some condensation forming in the container which results in a STICKY dough that sucks up dusting flour like a sponge sucks up water. Another option is to place the dough balls into individual plastic bags as we've discusses here a number of times. This method allows you to go about your business without the need to remember to come back and cover the dough and done correctly, it totally eliminates the condensation issue.
There is a possibility that with the dough being so sticky you are using an excessive amount of dusting flour (natural reaction to a sticky dough) which by itself is contributing to the toughness but the extra work that you are then putting into the dough will also create toughness in the finished crust.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline CIZ28

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Re: Reducing Chewiness in Pizza
« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2018, 03:04:57 AM »
What oven/surface/temperature?
"If it's not well done, it ain't done well."

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Reducing Chewiness in Pizza
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2018, 11:54:54 AM »
475 to 500F with a stone or baking steel should work well for you.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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