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Author Topic: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza  (Read 101755 times)

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Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #20 on: February 27, 2015, 01:34:53 PM »
Zombie Guy: How long is this going to bake?
Pizza Guy: 12 to 15 minutes.

Unless his answer was a big-time lie, he's baking at less than 500į. Probably considerably less than 500.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline BobC

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #21 on: February 27, 2015, 02:11:13 PM »
ryan,

I appreciate the comments...

A few things.  The by weight/percentage recipe underneath the volume recipe was for the same recipe in order to express it the same way people here see it.  I don't have a scale that can weigh a cup of water, so had to weigh smaller amounts of things and then extrapolate.  Because of that, all my recipes are by volume and that was how I typed it in originally. 

I used AP flour before because that's all I had.  The first batch with bread flour, I goofed when making the preferment and started the batch using AP flour by mistake initially for the first 1 1/3 cups, and used the bread flour for the rest.  I bought a 50 lb bag of the high protein bread/crust flour, so I plan to make current and future pizzas with it now that I have it.

Originally, I was using regular sugar, but my crusts were bland.  I tried brown sugar and that helped, so then when I found out Vincent used molasses, I tried that with regular sugar.  The malt sugar Idea came from Alton Brown's pizza, and he used it because it ferments more slowly than regular sugar.   I make beer sometimes, so I had plenty sitting here, and tried it, and liked it.  All I had was amber or plain, so I arbitrarily chose the amber, LOL.

The granulated onion is something I added.  It gives a bite of otherwise plain crust a little more flavor, you barely notice it, but when I took it away I think it lost flavor, so I went back to using it.  Its mostly a sugar, I would say, but its lighter than sugar.  Pretend its another 1/2 tsp of sugar if you like.

I will try reducing yeast to .55%.  I was using 1 tsp per lb of dough hoping to get bigger bubbles, but I think it just made the dough rise quicker initially.

Next batch I will try to go to 68% hydration with the bread flour, warm it up and see if I can make a pizza with it, and see if I get my big bubbles.

Thanks for the comments/suggestions

PS: And I think the 10-12 min was a lie, just like I think the 1 1/2 lbs was a lie, at least for that sized pizza.  If I bake at 500 its problems for the crust not getting crispy and being doughy, if I remember right. 

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #22 on: February 27, 2015, 03:43:33 PM »
Originally, I was using regular sugar, but my crusts were bland.  I tried brown sugar and that helped, so then when I found out Vincent used molasses, I tried that with regular sugar.  The malt sugar Idea came from Alton Brown's pizza, and he used it because it ferments more slowly than regular sugar.   I make beer sometimes, so I had plenty sitting here, and tried it, and liked it.  All I had was amber or plain, so I arbitrarily chose the amber, LOL.

Well, if he is using molasses for sure, then use molasses.

OK, please pardon me in advance, because I think I'm going to have a lot to say in a very short amount of time, and it will probably be overwhelming. And it will also probably be split up into many posts, as I have been reading this on my phone. Sorry, I'm just like that.

Something I want to say while I'm thinking about it: Get a scale. For the price of that 50-pound bag of flour, you can have a digital scale that will make your pizzamaking life infinitely easier. There is no way to convert volumetric measurements to weight measurements. Some people on this web site may argue that it is possible, but it's not. In fact, every time you measure "one cup" of flour, it's a different amount of flour than every other "one cup" of flour you've ever measured. It may be possible to get relatively close, but there is no such thing as one cup of flour. Choosing not to measure ingredients by weight is akin to choosing not to use an oven to bake your pizzas.

I have a request here: Please do not ever take Alton Brown seriously when it comes to pizza. He knows nothing about pizza, which is painfully evident every time I see him make "pizza." Just by looking at your dough skin in the original post, I can tell you know infinitely more about pizza than Alton Brown does. And I'm not just trying to be nice here by saying that; I really mean it.

Also, regarding malt: That is a rarely used ingredient with pizza. So chances are that Vincent does not use malt powder. I have used malt syrup for two or three different styles of pizza, which are all kind of a similar style, but I originally bought it for one reason: because I wanted lots of blisters on the bottom of my Tommy's clone crust. And I haven't used it very much yet, but it seems to give me the blisters I want. Aside from the blisters, I have not found one reason yet to justify using malt syrup instead of sugar. If Alton Brown suggests using malt powder or malt syrup in pizza dough, it's probably because in his 15 minutes of research about that show's topic, he read a post on pizzamaking.com in which someone said something about malt powder or malt syrup.

And everything I said about Alton Brown can also be said of pretty much every celebrity chef. Celebrity chefs are not pizzamakers. In fact, regular chefs are not pizzamakers, either. Nor are bakers pizzamakers. There may be a few chefs and bakers out there who know something about pizza, but the vast majority of chefs and bakers know essentially nothing about pizza.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #23 on: February 27, 2015, 04:21:36 PM »
mix into a thick batter sponge and cover, let proof 30 min

mix 4 tsp table salt with 4 more cups flour, and mix into sponge

put dough hook on mixer and mix 5 min

Rest 10 min then mix another 5 min

And before I forget about this, I just want to say that I think you should forget about this stuff (that I quoted). Doing this stuff is not a sign of being more sophisticated or anything like that. Rather, it's a sign of complicating the process for no reason, like Alton Brown wants you to do (because it makes him seem smarter to people who don't realize he's full of it, which I admit once included myself).

When you do all that stuff, first it doesn't do anything for you. Furthermore it makes you unable to control variables or reproduce your process from one batch to another, like dough temperature and length of fermentation. All it really does is keep you from knowing what's happening with your dough.

You can get away with doing that kind of stuff when you're making bread, because you bake every loaf at essentially the same time that you bake every other loaf. With pizza you don't have that luxury because pizza buyers want FRESH, just-out-of-the-oven pizza regardless of whether it's 11 AM or 11 PM.

Two very different things.

I did all kinds of complicated things when I was a relative beginner, too, because I thought it made my pizza better. But guess what? It didn't. All it did was complicate everything and hold me back for a very long time.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline PrimeRib

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #24 on: February 27, 2015, 05:26:08 PM »
I watched the video and it just looks like there's a ton of extra dough around the rim. I also believe that is a very high hydration dough.

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Offline BobC

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #25 on: February 28, 2015, 03:30:10 AM »
Ryan,

I am the type that takes everything with a grain of salt.  You make good points about questioning whether the things you are using or doing have value or not.

I came by that sequence from making all bread for the past 2 or 3 years.  I'm just letting the yeast get going real good before adding the salt.  The mix rest mix thing is because the 1st mix without the rest doesn't seem to absorb all the moisture well, but the 2nd one it turns into knots on the hook.  With bread it also made a softer, finer but chewy bread, like a Bialy, and I wanted that texture in the rim of my crust.  I suppose to be fair I should make a batch with the same exact ingredients doing it this way, vs not, and make pizza with each at the same time and decide which is better or if there is any difference.   And I should probably do the same with the malt powder vs sugar.

I took 4 doughballs to a "pizza party" and made pizza tonight.  I forgot my pizza stone, so had to bake on a screen in an electric oven.  The first was a little overdone on the bottom, and the 2nd came out a little too soon, not bad, but not crispy enough underneath, but the 3rd and 4th pies came out perfect, big crunchy, soft, sauce flavored bubbles and all, and by the time I left, kids were coming back for 4ths and 5ths, the adults were all stuffed to the gills, and there wasn't a piece of pizza left in the house.


Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #26 on: February 28, 2015, 09:01:54 AM »
Just don't feel like I was trying to take over either your thread or your pizzamaking. I guess I just had a lot of energy and excitement about making pizza yesterday, which I haven't had in a while, and your original post (and the thread) caught my interest. Plus I felt much better than usual yesterday, after having a horrible week. Perfect storm.

And everything I said about bakers and chefs not being pizzamakers, I also feel the same about the opposite. That is, pizzamakers are not bakers or chefs. So it's not that I have some kind of irrational, obsessive-compulsive problem with bakers or chefs just because they are bakers and chefs. Rather, I have a problem with people consciously portraying themselves as experts when they are not (especially when much of their audience has been led to believe they are an expert about every topic they may cover on their shows). Which is why I don't go onto baking boards or cooking boards and act like I'm an expert about either of those things just because I think I'm pretty knowledgeable about pizza. I may actually know a little bit about baking and cooking, but I'm not a baker or a chef; not even close. And what I know from making pizza does not necessarily apply to cooking or baking, because they are all different disciplines, with different objectives.

I have a question: What makes you think he lied about the bake time (12-15 minutes)?

Also, I can see how the 1-1/2 lbs of dough may have been inaccurate without being a lie, first of all because I use less dough than that for 18" NY style skins, but also because I can see how he may have rounded the dough weight number somewhat inaccurately by accident. (Also, I'm pretty sure that pizza was nowhere near 18", yet it seemed pretty thin.)

And seriously, your pizzas look infinitely better than Alton Brown's pizzas. I hope everyone else can see that, and that some of them might back me up.

I'm now going to back off and shut my mouth for a bit (unless I don't).
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline BobC

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #27 on: February 28, 2015, 10:15:51 AM »
A couple things.  I really love eating pizza, but I hate what I get when I go out, and can't afford to go anyway, work being super spotty the past few years.  And its not like all the pizzas I bought were cheap ones either.  Every year I have to take my wife out for her birthday and she always seems to want pizza, and each time I've taken her to a top rated or award winning place.  My goal is that even with limited funds, I want to make significantly better pizza than I can buy, and I want to be able to do that consistently, and not spend an arm and a leg to do it.  We eat pizza (and I make it all) at least once or twice a week, so it better be good!  The pizza places we've been to like Lou Malnatis and Fratos and Giordanos or ones she's ordered from like Sir Nicks, Jakes, Dominos, Papa Johns were not worth comparing to as compared to my memories of Vincent's, so that's the one I'm using as a bar to compare to.

Why do I think he lied about the time?  Three things...  Vincent made great pizza, but maybe he didn't want people able to copy it, so he might "lead them astray".  And secondly, there is a huge difference between 12 and 15 minutes.  Third is that I stood there with my nose up to the glass watching every little thing he did, and how he did it every time I went there, and I really don't think it was 12 to 15 minutes. 

It wasn't like McDonalds where a buzzer or beeper goes off when each fryer is done.  Vincent would check the oven at least once every couple minutes if there were pizzas in it, and I'm sure he knew it well enough to know when to pull it.  If my memory is correct I recall him opening it and using the peel to lift a corner and check the bottom and move it out of the way to get at another when there were a few in it when it was busy, which many times it was.

As for the 1 1/2 lbs of dough, Vincent did make some REALLY big pizzas, and he did make a thick crust at the rim, so I can imagine that his largest pizza might really have been a 1 1/2 lb hunk of dough, but I don't think the one he made in the video was any where near that.  The center of it was a thinner crust, not as thin as what I had in NYC, but not strong enough to hold the toppings without you holding your other hand under it, and the rim was pretty thick, with bubbles as high as 2", at least a few on each pie, and even where it wasn't it was a goodly amount of very tasty crust.  Everyone always ate their crust.  You look at it and say "thats a lot of crust", but it got eaten because it really was good, both texture and flavor, and no, it didn't taste the same as any of these others.   

The bottom was literally crispy with a little charring, and when you'd bite into the rim it would crunch both top and bottom.  Inside the rim it was soft and springy, and a bit chewy, and not doughy in the middle.  Many times my Mom would get him to make one or two extra half baked, and they'd be on cardboard, and covered with white freezer paper, stapled down at the edges, and they'd barely fit in the big freezer in the basement.  They were done in just a few minutes, I'm pretty sure, and would barely fit in the oven to finish baking.

If I had to guess, a 14 or 15" pie might be 16 oz of Vincent's dough, but we had 5 kids, so we always got the biggest pizza.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2015, 10:17:38 AM by BobC »

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #28 on: February 28, 2015, 10:21:54 AM »
I just watched the video again. The following must be why I thought there should possibly be more than 1-2% of oil in the dough: Just listen to the crunch when he cuts the pizzas. Of course, that may also have to do with a relatively low bake temperature and relatively long bake time.

And here's another hint that isn't immediately obvious in the video: They seem to have filmed that discussion about cigarette ashes while the pizzas were baking. Chances are that they didn't do it in one take. So if they didn't do it in one take, that suggests a relatively long bake time, because those pizzas that they took out of the oven were definitely the same pizzas they put in the oven.

However, it's possible that they taped the cigarette discussion either before or after baking the pizzas, then edited everything to make it look like the discussion happened while the pizzas were baking. Just some things to think about.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline BobC

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #29 on: February 28, 2015, 11:24:40 AM »
Definitely lots of crunch that you could hear on the other side of the glass when he'd cut it. 

I NEVER saw him leave the oven area when he had pizza's in.  Not even for a minute.  He'd have his cigarette hanging from his lip because he only took time to light it and never would put it down that I recall.  He would light another up while waiting to pull pizzas from the oven.  I was only 10 or 12 at the time, but some scenes just sort of stick in your brain.  There was no way it was in the oven 12 to 15 minutes.  Maybe 12 to 15 minutes from the time you'd order?  It couldn't have been in the oven more than 8 to 10 minutes max.   I only saw him make pizza on Ardmore Blvd near the WTAE tower.  Back then you could smoke in places like that, and they also served beer, becuase I remember my parents getting a plastic pitcher of beer and us kids getting a pitcher of coke one of the times we ate there, but usually my Dad and I would go there after tennis at Forest Hills, and stop there, order and get pizzas to go, and take them home.

Like I said, crunch on top and bottom.  I can tell when I'm getting that right, and doing well with that, except when I had the "unfamiliar pan and oven" issues last night.  I'm not wiping down the dough balls, just putting a few drops of oil on the containers themselves, so the total amount of oil used is like 1 1/2 tsp per 16 oz pie, ie not that much to worry about, I don't think, but I do think that's helping the "springiness" of the crust when you bite into it, especially the big bubbles, and I really like the texture I got this last batch, so maybe I'll just up the moisture a little and leave everything else alone.

Evidently my hosts took some "Pizza Porn" pics last night that they sent to people that didn't get invited, LOL, and they are going to send them they said, so if they look good I'll post those too.  I really didn't have time to be taking pics, as I was too busy making pizzas.  I was very happy to get the slice with the big bubble :)  The sweet and spicy sauce sort of carmelizes on the bubble and because its up higher it gets crispy on top, and when you bite into it, it squished down and then sprung back up.  I just like that.

PS: I got a message from the hosts from last night with the mob of kids...

"Vince (about 7 or 8 yrs old) is talking about how "amazing" your pizza is!  He and Will (the 5 or 6 yr old) said u should open a pizza place."   

So the kids are sitting there raving over last night's pizzas at the breakfast table.  Can't get a better vote than that.  BTW, there were no pieces of crust on the plates or in the trash, and there is no dog, so it must have been a good crust.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2015, 11:58:21 AM by BobC »

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Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #30 on: February 28, 2015, 12:17:27 PM »
Another thought I had over the last couple hours: Is there any chance they might use eggs (or egg whites?) in the dough? I would think a few percent of egg might give it a kind of crispy crunch, not unlike what I thought I heard when he cut the pizzas, but I am not familiar enough with how eggs affect crust to provide much or any insight.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #31 on: February 28, 2015, 12:30:11 PM »
PS: I got a message from the hosts from last night with the mob of kids...

"Vince (about 7 or 8 yrs old) is talking about how "amazing" your pizza is!  He and Will (the 5 or 6 yr old) said u should open a pizza place."   

So the kids are sitting there raving over last night's pizzas at the breakfast table.  Can't get a better vote than that.  BTW, there were no pieces of crust on the plates or in the trash, and there is no dog, so it must have been a good crust.

You belong here, man. Like I've said a couple times already, your pizzas look very good. So stick around, eh, because just keeping your mind on pizzamaking by reading these boards will help you progress at a rate you never would've thought possible.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #32 on: February 28, 2015, 12:35:30 PM »
I just did a Google image search for this place, and wow, that really is a big outer crust. I did not get the same impression from the video.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline BobC

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #33 on: February 28, 2015, 01:12:59 PM »
You need to find pics that are old because Vincent stopped working in 2005 and died in 2010 I read.  Some of these newer ones I've seen had the height of Vincent's crust, and maybe used the same dough recipe, but it looks like they got silly putting so much pepperoni on that it just made a mess or so much crust around the outside that it was like a loaf of bread.  They did not look anything like what I remember Vincent making.  The pizzas in the video I posted were true to form of Vincent making smallish or maybe medium sized pizzas, probably in the 80's or 90's based on how old he looks, but he sounds and acts just like he ever did.

I do remember getting a Vincent's pepperoni once and there was some red grease on it from the pepperoni, but not a huge amount.  He definitely didn't chinz out on the toppings, but he would just quickly scatter them on in less than 10 seconds per topping the way I remember it.  In the video he goes much slower with the sauce than I remember, for example.  In the real world it was zip, zip, zip and he'd quickly sort of slop some on and then spreaded it quickly with the back of the ladle.  And I remember how he would literally THROW the mushrooms and pepperoni on.  The toppings were in big metal bowls already chopped up sort of surrounding his pizza making area on the counter.  The sausage he was more careful with and he'd sort of break up the hunks of loose sausage as he'd put it on, much faster than a  normal person, but not just throwing it on.  I remember the sweetness and red pepper and fennel tastes in it, and the sausage went on last, I think, and I'm guessing that was because it was raw and he had to be careful that it would cook completely enough.  He doesn't do it in the video, but maybe that because it isn't a big pizza, but I recall him giving it a little shake on the board, too.

I'll have to go look at pics.  When I make cheese or pepperoni, I try to get the colors just like Vincent would make them.  There were beautifully colored yellows and browned spots, and delicious to the last bite, and I remember the cheese being gooey and stringy when we ate there, but it was 10 min to home so the take out ones weren't as hot.

Ok, here are some pics I found, but to be honest, the two pizza's in the video I posted are the best, closest to my memory of what his pizzas looked like, except that we got the 19" ones, which was his size for large.  I also found the menu and gallery, and the pizza's have more crust around them now than the ones he made, and it seems like maybe the same amount of topping are just squeezed into that smaller area in the middle if I was to guess.  Look at the color of his dough "patties" as he called them.  They are too soft to stay as balls of dough, and they are darker than normal in the pics, I think.  At Ardmore blvd I maybe was too small to be able to see the patties till he'd get it up on the counter work area, and in the video he appears to have to bend over to dig it out just like he did when I watched, and it was real soft, just like I remember.

The building pic is very old, but that's what the signs around it looked like, and yes, I remember the car abandoned there, LOL.  The last pic is from 2012, but it looks like a pizza we would have gotten there, not a silly amount of crust, but plentry, and plenty of toppings, and well colored...

« Last Edit: February 28, 2015, 04:57:07 PM by BobC »

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #34 on: February 28, 2015, 02:01:51 PM »
Here's another indication that they may bake at a relatively low temperature: There are clearly at least three ovens in that place. The higher temperature you bake at, the fewer ovens you need. Similarly, the lower temperature you bake at, the more ovens you need. Which is why most Neapolitan places only have one oven, with one baking chamber, and why when you see Malnati's on TV, you see like four stacks of ovens.

I still feel pretty confident that this place bakes at 500 or lower.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

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Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #35 on: February 28, 2015, 02:04:40 PM »
Well, the pictures you added to your last post answer the question of whether they use dough balls or bulk fermented dough.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #36 on: February 28, 2015, 02:13:11 PM »
Something is making me think they use their dough the same day they make it, too, and that it never sees refrigeration.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline vtsteve

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #37 on: February 28, 2015, 02:17:48 PM »
Well, the pictures you added to your last post answer the question of whether they use dough balls or bulk fermented dough.

They must have been all grown together though... you could see the hacked edges.  :-D
In grams we trust.
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Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #38 on: February 28, 2015, 02:21:57 PM »
They must have been all grown together though... you could see the hacked edges.  :-D

Yeah, I noticed that yesterday after I speculated that they use dough balls. I don't think the first pizza in the video looked ragged like that, but I think the second pizza did. Still, he fetched the dough so fast that I couldn't imagine it being from a large mass of dough.
Ryan
http://www.ryanspizzablog.blogspot.com

Disclaimer: Don't necessarily believe anything I say here. My brain ain't quite right anymore (unless it is). If I come off as rude or argumentative, that's probably not my intention. Rather, that's just me being honest, to myself and everyone else; partly because I don't have enough time left to BS either you or myself. If you are offended by anything I say, it's probably because you think lying to people (to be "polite") is a good idea. I don't.

Offline Essen1

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Re: My first bread/crust flour pizzas--Vincent's Pizza
« Reply #39 on: February 28, 2015, 02:24:31 PM »
Mike

ďAll styles of pizza are valid. I make the best Iím capable of; you should make the best youíre capable of. I donít want to make somebody elseís pizza.Ē ~ Chris Bianco

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