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Author Topic: Pizzarium  (Read 264549 times)

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Offline parallei

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #1340 on: July 18, 2017, 11:07:52 AM »
Sorry, I don't have any pics, but can share my usual recipe.......
Rolls

Thanks for the detailed response.  I've always known that the pizza should be baked without a rise in the pan but I have always make them when friends are coming for supper and they end up rising a bit.  For logistical reasons, and what if I were to blow it with everyone watching. :(

Online Rolls

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #1341 on: July 18, 2017, 12:37:22 PM »
Yes, I also sometimes take liberties with the "rules" by letting the pizza ferment in the pan.  I think the idea of stretching and baking right away is intended more for a commercial setting where time and space constraints are greater considerations. While this type of pizza is not one  of my favorites for eating, I do enjoy the workflow of making teglia Romana.

Rolls

Offline norma427

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #1342 on: July 18, 2017, 09:02:31 PM »
Hi Norma,

I'm sorry to be a bore here, but a decent bread flour like KA or Better for Bread works just fine for this style.  If you want to tart it up a bit, use 5-10% WW or Spelt or some blend. 

Rolls- What is your formula/method?  Any pics?  Love to see them.

Paul,

You are not a bore.  I like to hear about what flours other members use for different styles of pizzas.  :) I went to reply this morning and our electric went off.  There was an accident nearby.  What a mess that was trying to get a bath and getting ready for market.   :-D

Norma


Offline norma427

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Re: Pizzarium
« Reply #1343 on: July 18, 2017, 09:05:51 PM »
The W value is an indication of a flour's strength, obtained using a Chopin Alveograph, for the purpose of classifying flours for different applications. A sample dough is mixed under specific conditions and the sample pieces are blown up with air, much like a balloon, to the point of rupture. Based on this, information regarding the dough's tenacity (P) and extensibility (L) are plotted on a chart, which, in turn, is used to calculate the W value and P/L ratio of the flour.

Here are some very general guidelines:

W<120 - weak flour, not suitable for breads; used for certain pastries, cookies
W 120-150 - weak flour, not suitable for breads; used for crackers, cookies, breadsticks
W 160-200 - medium/weak strength flour suitable for breads (DIRECT METHOD) short fermentation times; pizza, focaccia
W 200-250 - medium strength flour suitable for breads (DIRECT METHOD) short fermentation times; pizza, focaccia
W 250-320 - medium/strong flour suitable for breads (DIRECT METHOD & INDIRECT METHOD) with medium fermentation times
W>320 - strong flours used for doughs requiring extended fermentation times such as sourdough breads, panettone etc.
W> 400 - ultra-strong, high gluten flours usually added to weaker flours to bolster average protein content


Rolls

Thanks Rolls! 

Sorry, I don't have any pics, but can share my usual recipe:

Five Roses AP Flour 90%
Remilled Semolina 10%
Water 75%
Salt 2.2%
Olive Oil 2%
<1% IDY

I hydrate the IDY in the water and combine with the rest of the ingredients, adding the oil at the end. I mix by hand to a smooth and homogenous consistency and aim for a target dough temperature of 24C. I usually cold ferment at 4C in the fridge for 36 hours after which I divide the cold dough mass and roll into 2 oblong loaves. These are fermented at RT for several hours (usually 4) and then the dough ball is stretched to about 2/3 its final size on the bench which has been generously covered with a mix of semolina rimacinata and rice flour. Excess bench flour is shaken off and the dough is placed in a lightly greased sheet pan. It is stretched to its final dimensions and baked without further proofing at 380F until done. The toppings are usually staged depending on the ingredients. The amount of dough is calculated by determing the area of the pan in cm²/2. For example, a sheet pan 30cm by 40cm =1200cm²/2 = 600gm of dough. (I usually add an extra 10%)

IMO, the challenge of this type of pizza is trying to coordinate the fermentation schedule such that at the point of baking, the dough has enough fermentation gases and, perhaps more importantly, the right extensibility. Unlike many focaccia recipes, teglia alla Romana should be stretched and baked right away. The gluten network needs to be sufficiently relaxed and a delicate touch is required when handling this relatively high hydration dough. Final crust texture should be crispy and crunchy.

I learned to stretch this dough by studying the youtube videos of Pino Arletto.

Rolls

Thanks for your information!  When there is time will try it. 

Norma

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