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Author Topic: Making the most of your home oven  (Read 18998 times)

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Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Making the most of your home oven
« Reply #60 on: August 23, 2018, 11:26:05 AM »
 :-D :-D :-D thank you for the laugh.  Honestly I'm on the journey like everyone else.  Mastery is truely a life long pursuit and achievement.   Maybe by the end of it all, we all realize there is no perfection, only the process. 

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Making the most of your home oven
« Reply #61 on: August 23, 2018, 12:27:10 PM »
Chau,

You are clearly a man of great wisdom. I liked your post at Reply 58 so much that I added a link to Reply 58 at the thread Pizza Secrets and Pearls, which you originally started. My post is Reply 92 at

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=41845.msg541134#msg541134

Also, this morning I happened to stumble across a link to an article that I think you (and maybe others) will like since it is relevant to a lot of what we do on this forum. The article is at:

https://hbr.org/2018/05/learning-is-a-learned-behavior-heres-how-to-get-better-at-it

Peter

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Making the most of your home oven
« Reply #62 on: August 23, 2018, 02:10:23 PM »
Thank you for the kind words Peter.   That article you linked to is an excellent article on the process of learning.  It makes great points and is spot on about the process of improving our learning.   I can see each of those points being played out in my own learning process when it comes to pizza and other foods.  For example, there have been several times when I have walked about from Pizza making for months at a time, only to have a new revelation that drives me back to experimenting.  Not just with pizza, but I have lots of different food projects going at once.  Often times,  because of the something that I hear on TV, or see somewhere, and sometimes its even completely unrelated to food, I will get ideas or a newer understanding for the different projects.  I jot down the ideas, and test them out as soon as I can. 

One of the biggest pitfalls for me when it comes to improving my learning about pizza making, is that I often will want to reference certain bakes.  I go back to my notes and realize that I didn't take sufficient notes on a particular bake.  I can see that I achieved a certain result that I want to replicate, but I can't accurately look at all the steps because I wasn't detailed enough in my own note keeping.  Or that I've thinned out my folder and have gotten rid of said notes. 

Currently, I will take excess notes on my food projects, noting details that I may not even think is important right now.  I will try to paint as accurate  a picture of the process I took and the results I got.  And especially of the bakes that I get great results on, I'll take pictures and date them and save them.  That way when I need to reference a particular bake, in hindsight, when my understanding is better and more clear, I can improve my learning by a higher percent.   It makes my learning much more efficient and enjoyable. 

Chau

Offline Minolta Rokkor

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Re: Making the most of your home oven
« Reply #63 on: August 28, 2018, 09:37:41 PM »
I'm upset because  I moved, and the current oven only goes to 500*F. It's also smaller too.
Pizza is about balance, nothing more nothing less

Offline quietdesperation

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Re: Making the most of your home oven
« Reply #64 on: November 08, 2018, 12:00:20 PM »
this was a great read! It's interesting to see how bake times, temp and use of stone(s) evolved over time. While Chau is obviously making great ny pies, to my eye, they align closer to NY elite than street slices (think joe's or suprema). With the guidance of the departed (from the forum) harryhaller, some of us have gotten closer to street style by using longer bakes, temps in the 485-500F range, a single steel plate or stone and no use of the broiler.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2018, 12:02:52 PM by quietdesperation »
"If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world" - the hobbit, jrr tolkien

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Making the most of your home oven
« Reply #65 on: May 08, 2020, 10:57:13 AM »
For a discussion about using a baking steel in a home oven, see:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=62519.msg619711;topicseen#new

Peter

Offline wb54885

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Re: Making the most of your home oven
« Reply #66 on: January 02, 2021, 11:52:52 AM »
ďEvery oven is a law unto itself and only itself.Ē Thatís the Dough Doctor talking, and itís one of the best tips I know of to get to the next level in pizza:  start with the oven you have and determine what itís capable of, and work backward from there to maximize its potential to make great pizza by designing your pizza and strategizing your bake to fit the heat. This has been true of every deck oven Iíve workedómostly older beat up Bakers Pride double stacks each with their own language of hot spots, cracks, thermostat quirks and maximum tempsóand now that Iím making pies at home I see itís just as true for residential ovens. Happy I found this thread to share.

Lately Iíve been having very good bakes at home on a 3/8Ē steel, but have been looking covetously at other steel baked pies because they seem to get more even top and bottom heat than mine. I was wondering if it was the effect of mass, 3/8Ē thickness vs 1/2Ē, or if other ovens are just better insulated than mine. I live in a studio apartment with an older Hotpoint oven, a poor little electric thing they put in very small kitchens that gets up to 135F on the metal exterior surface of the oven when itís on for more than 20 minutes. It also doesnít have an insulating strip on the interior top of the door so it leaks heat directly up to the plastic knobs when itís on, meaning if you need to adjust burners or the oven temp while cooking, youíre twisting a scalding plastic disc of pain. Such are the joys of the apartment rental market.

My steel preheats to over 600F with no problem, and Iíve been baking with the broiler on during the whole bake, so my inconsistent top heat was nagging at me. Then I realized that the answer was way simpler than I thought:  my broiler was shutting off much too quickly after I launched my pies, and it turns out itís because the thermostat is right next to the broiler. So I took the time-honored step of screwing with my thermostat.

All I had to do was pull it from the metal hooks holding it against the roof of the oven after it was preheated and let it dangle against the bottom of the oven when I closed the door and turned on the broiler. Easy as that! Last night, I had excellent 4 minute bakes with awesome heat matched between top and bottom.

So the lesson is to always ask yourself if youíve asked all the right questions yet, poke around your oven with a flashlight, and see if youíve determined what itís truly capable of before you go looking at other pieces of the puzzle and more expensive, even heavier equipment, or resign yourself to less-than-fully-satisfactory pies at home. I quickly went from thinking I just had a crappy oven to realizing that with a simple change in strategy, this little guy is perfect for what I want to achieve. My steel is 14Ēx16Ē and barely fits this thing, but the small dimensions are actually working in my favor now that I know how to get the broiler to blast for the full bake. Pies in the next post.
Every oven is a law unto itself and only itself.

Offline wb54885

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Re: Making the most of your home oven
« Reply #67 on: January 02, 2021, 11:56:09 AM »
Saga of discovery above ^

These pizzas baked up crispy on the outside, fluffy on the insideóthe eggshell crunch I dream of.

The dough is KABF with 10% stiff sourdough preferment that rose at room temp for 8 hours and then sat in the fridge for 2 days before I mixed it into the final dough.

Final dough:

64% H2O
10% preferment
2.5 salt
2 oil
.4 ADY

Rest bulk dough in the fridge for 3 days, ball and let rise at room temp for 5-6 hours before baking. The flavor was very good for a 3-day cold ferment, and tasted more like the funk of 5 or 6 days. Iím guessing the old dough/sourdough preferment is to thank there. This will be my home oven formula for a while.

Sauce is Tomato Magic with sautťed garlic and onion, salt, garlic and onion powder, dried basil and oregano.

Boarís Head WM mozzarella sliced, sauce on top.

1. Marinara w/ chili oil and parm

2. Cheese and basil

3. Red onion, green olive, Chinese red pepper, basil and parm
Every oven is a law unto itself and only itself.

Offline amolapizza

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Re: Making the most of your home oven
« Reply #68 on: January 02, 2021, 12:21:51 PM »
Hey, nice discovery!

Yes I think that's 100% true, find out what your oven is capable of and tailor your pizza and dough accordingly.
Jack

Effeuno P134H (500C), Biscotto Fornace Saputo, Sunmix Sun6, Caputo Pizzeria, Caputo Saccorosso, Mutti Pelati.

Offline Rolls

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Re: Making the most of your home oven
« Reply #69 on: January 04, 2021, 04:35:46 PM »
wb54885,

You and your oven display the same spirit of optimism and perseverance as "The Little Engine That Could".  Standout pizza my friend! :pizza:


Rolls
Getting old, memory is the second thing to go......Can't remember the first.

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