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Author Topic: Natural sugars in flour. Breaking down the Carbohydrates. How healthy is it?  (Read 244 times)

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Offline icemanxp300

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So I was trying to decide how much sugars are in my Pizza. I am dieting again and while I don't worry too much about carbs I do limit my sugars. I use KASL flour and from my understanding flour has about .3g sugar for 30g (1/4) flour. I make 2 large pizzas using 914g flour. That means about 57g of flour per slice or roughly 1/2g natural sugars in the flour.

I don't add sugar anymore I switched to ldm which I use 1/3 compared to sugar or for this recipe 12 grams. The sauce and cheese I use have no sugars and the pepperoni says less than a gram for 15 slices.

All in all I'm figuring 1 g sugar at most per slice. I CF for 24 hrs. Tony Gemignani says the yeast eats the sugars while CF and makes the dough easier to digest. This makes me wonder if I even have much of any of the natural sugars in the flour left after it CF.

This brings me to the carbs. I'm pretty sure this would be considered complex carbs. Complex carbs would be turned into glucose (blood sugar). I'm curious how much of this glucose I would be getting per slice. I'm by far no nutritionist so I don't have a huge understanding of it all.

I'm just trying to figure out how healthy my pizza is compared to other foods. I know it's way better than what most shops make. I'm curious if the dough digest through you faster because it has been CF and less glucose is made by your body during the digestion process. If you have any insight on the subject I'd love to hear it.

Offline TXCraig1

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Yeast are really good at metabolizing sucrose, so "sugar" added to the dough will get used first. Basically, the yeast are going to do what they are going to do, and the enzymes are going to do what they are going to do. A certain amount of sugar is needed to complete fermentation. Most of extra is going to remain as sugars of whatever type (maltose, glucose, fructose). Adding LDM will increase the rate of starch->sugar conversion which may speed up fermentation but isn't going to change the total amount of sugars used much which is why the dough will brown more when LDM is use, there is an excess of sugars in the dough. Is the difference material from a nutritional perspective? I don't know, but I tend to doubt it. Also, I used to believe in the improved digestibility thing, but now I think it's a wives tale.

"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Offline icemanxp300

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Also, I used to believe in the improved digestibility thing, but now I think it's a wives tale.


I'm not sure. Last April I want to say we went to my sisters for a house warming party. She ordered some local Pizza, Salvatore's if you have heard of them. I find most of them inedible myself, but this shop was "ok". My wife ate 1 small piece and a few hours later went for a run. She got back and her stomach was killing her.

As compared to the pizza I make she never has a problem running afterwards and my slices are at least twice as big as what she ate. Now whether that has anything to do w/the dough being CF I don't know. I know I don't use vegetable oil at all in my dough, I can't stand the taste. I add 10g of EVOO for the above recipe at the end of mixing.

My pizza is essentially greaseless as compared to some Pizza shops where it is so bad you have to use napkins to sob up the grease. I honestly do not like any Pizza shops around me at all now. At any rate better ingredients, easier digestibility, less grease, I'm not 100% certain what the exact reason was as to why my wife's stomach felt so bad after eating that pizza.

As far as CF goes I mainly do 24 hour because I notice a HUGE taste difference in the dough as compared to same day. I do not notice much difference in taste between 24 and 48 hr CF though.

Offline Pete-zza

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icemanxp300,

One of my favorite places to read about the role of sugars in flours is the section called Sugar Transformations (Rosada) at:

http://www.theartisan.net/The_Artisan_Yeast_Treatise_Section_One.htm

If you are not adding sugar in any form to your dough, I don't think that the amounts of natural sugars in the finished crust will be in an amount to give you concern. FYI, the amount of Sugars in the KASL is 0.92 grams for 100 grams of flour:

https://web.archive.org/web/20060311133549/http://www.kingarthurflour.com/stuff/contentmgr/files/528fa553a218e1e5566108ef6e4c55d9/miscdocs/Nutritional%20Analysis.pdf

Most commercial tomato products that I am aware of include natural sugars. Even fresh tomatoes have natural sugars:

https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2682/2

From what I have read, most nutrition experts do not frown on natural sugars in ones diet, with one of the main exceptions being drinks like orange juice and the like (oranges are OK however). Some nutrition experts may also frown on honey, maple syrup and other natural syrup products.

Peter

Offline Yael

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As the flour is around 67% starch and starch (carbs) is (complex) sugar, are you not eating more sugar than you are counting?  ???

I think the digest thing is mainly related to gluten.
“Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist” - Pablo Picasso

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Offline icemanxp300

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As the flour is around 67% starch and starch (carbs) is (complex) sugar, are you not eating more sugar than you are counting?  ???

I think the digest thing is mainly related to gluten.

Well the sugars gets tricky as ordinary sugar is processed in your body very fast so you get tons of sugar all at once and likely the excess is stored as fat. Where as a complex carbohydrate is broken down slower so the sugars obtained from it is released slower giving your body a slower steadier supply of sugar it uses more of instead of storing it. That is if I understand the process correctly.

At the end of the day it probably doesn't matter too much as your body needs (x) amount of energy and it will obtain it from whatever is available. I think in the case of eating something like a candy bar it is just empty calories that don't fill you up much and you just get way more calories than you should. Where as eating something more nutritional fills you up more so you eat less.

I think I was looking into this from the wrong perspective at first. The main thing that matters is the calories in the pizza. Now from my research it seems making the pizza w/out sugar is better because your body doesn't break down the dough as fast and you can stay fuller longer. Where as tossing sugar in will allow you to process the dough faster and as such you don't stay full as long so you go back and eat more essentially giving you more calories.

Offline Yael

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Well the sugars gets tricky as ordinary sugar is processed in your body very fast so you get tons of sugar all at once and likely the excess is stored as fat. Where as a complex carbohydrate is broken down slower so the sugars obtained from it is released slower giving your body a slower steadier supply of sugar it uses more of instead of storing it. That is if I understand the process correctly.

At the end of the day it probably doesn't matter too much as your body needs (x) amount of energy and it will obtain it from whatever is available. I think in the case of eating something like a candy bar it is just empty calories that don't fill you up much and you just get way more calories than you should. Where as eating something more nutritional fills you up more so you eat less.

I think I was looking into this from the wrong perspective at first. The main thing that matters is the calories in the pizza. Now from my research it seems making the pizza w/out sugar is better because your body doesn't break down the dough as fast and you can stay fuller longer. Where as tossing sugar in will allow you to process the dough faster and as such you don't stay full as long so you go back and eat more essentially giving you more calories.

I see... That's what I thought but sometimes it's better to see it written. Thank you for your explanation!
“Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist” - Pablo Picasso

Offline Rolls

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As the flour is around 67% starch and starch (carbs) is (complex) sugar, are you not eating more sugar than you are counting?  ???

Bingo!


Rolls
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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Well put! Additionally, remember that hunger is triggered by a drop in blood sugar, so you pop a sugar cube, your blood sugar spikes and you're no longer hungry BUT soon that sugar is metabolized and your blood sugar once again drops, the process keeps repeating itself over and over again. This is actually pretty easy to demonstrate to yourself using sugar cubes or candy which is high in sugar (I don't recommend doing this if you are diabetic). I once had a lady tell me that she always got light headed when working out at the gym after work, I suggested that she eat two slices of bread before she left work, the starches/carbs in the bread were slowly converted to sugars which could be metabolized thus maintaining her blood sugar at a reasonable level, end result.....she no longer complained of getting light headed during her work out and she also indicated that she was no longer hungry enough to "eat a horse" when she got home. It's called blood sugar management, something more of us should pay closer attention to.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Brent-r

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Right on Tom.
I call this a defect in human metabolism
Our bodies are very poor at feeling your actual blood sugar levels but rather they sense the declining levels without regard to what they actually are. The decline triggers the hunger sensation.  This is what causes so many problems ...especially in children that get a high sugar breakfast and an hour or two after they get to school they are starving and want to sneak snacks out of their desks.   If they got a better balance at breakfast they would be fine until lunch and the obesity cycle would be broken
Brent

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