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Author Topic: Pizza al Taglio Progress  (Read 126 times)

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Offline tfox39

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Pizza al Taglio Progress
« on: May 25, 2020, 01:06:07 PM »
I wanted to share a bit of my progress as well as reach out with a few questions I still have. Reading through this board has been super helpful, thanks to posts by antlife, rolls, yael, etc. Thanks to everyone here, I am now consistently getting pizza like the pictures below. I still have issues, of course, but have also come up with my own workarounds. But I would love to hopefully be able to work towards fixing these issues the proper way.

I work with this recipe, making slight adjustments here and there with the weather.

1 Ball 72hr CF + 6-12hrs RT          
Flour           345   (10% Semolina)   Manitaly Manitoba Type ‘0’ Flour (W330-350) + Paolo Mariani Durum Wheat Semolina Flour
HR (80%)   276      
Salt (2.5%)   8.625      
IDY (.23%)     0.7935      
EVOO (2%)   6.9      
         
Total   637.3185      with dough loss, I'm typically around 620 grams going into a 30x40 pan.


I typically only do 2 balls at most and I will mix by hand. I mix the IDY into the water (85f/29c) and then proceed to slowly work in all of the flour. Once joined, depending on the temperature (it gets very hot and humid here), I will let it sit for 10-30 minutes and mix in the oil, salt, and 10 grams of water. Let that sit for about 15 minutes and then I do 4 or so stretch and folds every 15 minutes. I feel like I don't really go too intense on the stretch and folds, and more so just do it gently until it looks pretty smooth. I cover it (zero oil at the base of the tub) and throw it in the fridge until I ball it maybe around the 50-55hr mark. I'll pull it out after 72 hrs for about 10 hours. When I'm ready to bake, I crank the oven to 550f/287c with a stone on the bottom rack. Dough gets dumped onto a bed of semolina, stretched out, and then transferred to the pan where it gets sauced. I bake with the pan on the stone for 10-12 minutes, pull the pizza (depending on my toppings), and add cheese and whatever other toppings. Then the pan goes to the top rack for about 10 minutes more. I pull the pizza out of the pan at this point and transfer it to the pizza stone for 2-3 minutes to finish the bottom of the crust. Total bake time is about 22 minutes.

Here are some of my issues.

- My "blue steel" pan is horrible and gives me trouble. Maybe it isn't the real deal, as it bends/pops in the oven like an aluminum pan would. My pizzas started sticking and I couldn't get it well seasoned. I didn't want to use oil so I instead used parchment paper and, as it always does, it worked incredibly. Pizza jumps out of the pan. Would love to either get the correct pan and/or learn how to properly season this thing so I don't get my pizza sticking.

- Even after sitting at RT for 10 hours or so before baking, the dough doesn't want to full stretch out as easily. It never wants to tear, but I have trouble hitting all the corners of the pan without it slowly pulling back to the center. Not a major issue, but would like to figure out how to get it to stretch out a little better.

- Tied in with the stretching, because I am trying my best to work the dough to fill the pan, I sometimes get slightly uneven pizza. Nothing crazy thin, but I am definitely not getting the crumb shown in the photo throughout the whole pizza.

- I have only tried doing a sourdough version once and the dough became a monster overnight so I had to turn it into "focaccia". It turned out very well, but I would like to figure out how to do a sourdough version of this. Is it possible to stretch the time to 48-72 hours with a starter? Will the dough hold up over that period for this style?


Offline Fiorot

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Re: Pizza al Taglio Progress
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2020, 03:42:53 PM »
My first attempt and I am very happy.  I used oil on top and I feel it stopped the rise.   For a Sicilian pan you need more than a 700 g ball.  I am trying to figure how much more dough would be needed . 

Offline Yael

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Re: Pizza al Taglio Progress
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2020, 09:31:23 AM »
I wanted to share a bit of my progress as well as reach out with a few questions I still have. Reading through this board has been super helpful, thanks to posts by antlife, rolls, yael, etc. Thanks to everyone here, I am now consistently getting pizza like the pictures below. I still have issues, of course, but have also come up with my own workarounds. But I would love to hopefully be able to work towards fixing these issues the proper way.

I work with this recipe, making slight adjustments here and there with the weather.

1 Ball 72hr CF + 6-12hrs RT          
Flour           345   (10% Semolina)   Manitaly Manitoba Type ‘0’ Flour (W330-350) + Paolo Mariani Durum Wheat Semolina Flour
HR (80%)   276      
Salt (2.5%)   8.625      
IDY (.23%)     0.7935      
EVOO (2%)   6.9      
         
Total   637.3185      with dough loss, I'm typically around 620 grams going into a 30x40 pan.


I typically only do 2 balls at most and I will mix by hand. I mix the IDY into the water (85f/29c) and then proceed to slowly work in all of the flour. Once joined, depending on the temperature (it gets very hot and humid here), I will let it sit for 10-30 minutes and mix in the oil, salt, and 10 grams of water. Let that sit for about 15 minutes and then I do 4 or so stretch and folds every 15 minutes. I feel like I don't really go too intense on the stretch and folds, and more so just do it gently until it looks pretty smooth. I cover it (zero oil at the base of the tub) and throw it in the fridge until I ball it maybe around the 50-55hr mark. I'll pull it out after 72 hrs for about 10 hours. When I'm ready to bake, I crank the oven to 550f/287c with a stone on the bottom rack. Dough gets dumped onto a bed of semolina, stretched out, and then transferred to the pan where it gets sauced. I bake with the pan on the stone for 10-12 minutes, pull the pizza (depending on my toppings), and add cheese and whatever other toppings. Then the pan goes to the top rack for about 10 minutes more. I pull the pizza out of the pan at this point and transfer it to the pizza stone for 2-3 minutes to finish the bottom of the crust. Total bake time is about 22 minutes.

It looks nice!!

Here are some of my issues.

- My "blue steel" pan is horrible and gives me trouble. Maybe it isn't the real deal, as it bends/pops in the oven like an aluminum pan would. My pizzas started sticking and I couldn't get it well seasoned. I didn't want to use oil so I instead used parchment paper and, as it always does, it worked incredibly. Pizza jumps out of the pan. Would love to either get the correct pan and/or learn how to properly season this thing so I don't get my pizza sticking.
I can't help you on this one... I would just suggest to add as much oil as needed.

- Even after sitting at RT for 10 hours or so before baking, the dough doesn't want to full stretch out as easily. It never wants to tear, but I have trouble hitting all the corners of the pan without it slowly pulling back to the center. Not a major issue, but would like to figure out how to get it to stretch out a little better.
I would lower the amount of manitoba flour... maybe no more than 10~20%?

- Tied in with the stretching, because I am trying my best to work the dough to fill the pan, I sometimes get slightly uneven pizza. Nothing crazy thin, but I am definitely not getting the crumb shown in the photo throughout the whole pizza.
Training, training, training... (I still have the same problem) (although the bigger the dough ball, the thicker the crust will be, of course).

- I have only tried doing a sourdough version once and the dough became a monster overnight so I had to turn it into "focaccia". It turned out very well, but I would like to figure out how to do a sourdough version of this. Is it possible to stretch the time to 48-72 hours with a starter? Will the dough hold up over that period for this style?
Just add less sourdough!? IMO with the right amount you can make exactly as when using yeast.
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