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Author Topic: Sweets and Desserts  (Read 25496 times)

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Offline TXCraig1

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Sweets and Desserts
« on: August 16, 2016, 11:19:45 PM »
Post your homemade creations!

This was from a few weeks ago. Bourbon-vanilla peach cobbler with Blue Bell Homemade Vanilla ice cream. Peaches from my neighbor's tree  ;D
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Offline invertedisdead

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2016, 12:44:30 PM »
Snickers "cheese"-cake

Date caramel, walnut crust, cashew "cream cheese," Guittard dark chocolate, roasted peanuts.
the proof is in the pizza

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2016, 02:58:42 PM »
To go with my afternoon coffee:

Offline foreplease

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2016, 10:23:33 PM »
Every one of those looks delicious. Peaches are at their peak here right now and have been fabulous this year. I find it hard to improve upon a ripe raw peach unless it's with a pinch of sugar and some premium ice cream. I'm due for one in a few minutes in fact  ;D

I'm a big fan of blueberry pie in which the blueberries are not cooked. This is the first summer in a long time I have not made at least one of the pies, despite unlimited access to free berries. The season is mostly over but some of the farms further inland may still be producing. Now I gotta have one :)

I may have an old picture from another year. I'll look around and post the recipe if nothing else.

Keep 'em coming - I'm taking notes.
-Tony

Offline Ovenray

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2016, 05:47:02 PM »
These were from some time ago allready. Both are based on almond paste but with very different spices added. The small pies are called "Gevulde Koeken" while the bigger pie is called "Gevuld Speculaas".

All things learned are taken into account.

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Offline foreplease

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2016, 12:50:34 AM »
Here are the basics of the no-bake blueberry pie. Seems easily adaptable for other fruits. A picture would make this so much more interesting - I'm sorry I do not have one I can easily find.

A place my sister was a waitress during high school offered this kind of pie 30 or more years ago. She had an idea how they did it. Several years later I saw Alton Brown make this and I was sold.  I combined his ideas with something I read on Southern Cooking called "Easy Blueberry Pie."


Blueberry Pie (no bake)
Crust
1st choice: Alton Brown pie crust recipe
2nd choice: refrigerated store bought
Blind bake crust then cool to room temp before beginning filling beloFilling
6 cups fresh blueberries, divided (recipe calls for 6, 6 ½ + works better)
¼ cup sugar
2 TBS water
2 TBS cornstarch
¼ cup cold water
1 TBS butter (unsalted if you have it)
1 TBS lemon juice
Combine 2 cups berries, sugar, and 2 TBS water in large saucepan; bring to full boil.
Dissolve cornstarch in ¼ cup cold water; add to cooked blueberry mixture.
Return to boil, stirring constantly.
Reduce heat to low, stir and cook 2 minutes.
Remove from heat.
Add 1 tsp cinnamon (not sure who contributed this idea - I think it was us
Sitir in butter, lemon juice, and remaining 4 (+) cups blueberries. Stir to coat.
Pour into piecrust and refrigerate 1 ½-2 hours before serving.

Butter goes in whole cubed in small pieces. Residual heat from syrup breaks it down just enough when stirring in the 4 cups blueberries. Give is a wicked sheen.
-Tony

Offline Ovenray

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #6 on: September 19, 2016, 03:06:06 PM »
Almond puddingcake filled with slices of apple, one of my personal favorites  :drool:
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Offline HansB

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2016, 08:29:38 PM »
Looks great Ray! Can you share the recipe?
Hans

Offline Ovenray

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #8 on: September 19, 2016, 09:43:05 PM »
Looks great Ray! Can you share the recipe?

Thanks :)


[Cake bottom]

140 gram cakeflour (all purpose will do fine as well)
70 gram butter (with a high butterfat content)
70 gram sugar
1 egg
pinch of salt
pinch of baking powder


[Cake filling]

500ml milk (not uht)
70 gram soft curd cheese (cottage cheese will do as well)
150 gram sugar
5 tbs cakeflour (use larger spoons for a somewhat firmer cake)
6 eggs
600 gram sliced apples (skinned and the core removed, slices about 1cm thickness)
2 teaspoons almond extract
(optional: cinnamon sprinkled over the slices)


Oil a pan (or butter it up for some more flavor)
Combine the cakebottom ingredients till its a firm mass.

It is important to use a pan that is high enough to hold the complete list of ingredients
and still have atleast about 2 cm's free from the filling to the top of the pan as the batter,
which begins as a liquid, will also rise a few cm's during the bake because of the eggs and the moisture.
The best choice for a pan is a 'springform' but a 12 inch piepan like the one in the picture will do as well.
It is best to use some baking-paper on the bottom of the pan as this will help to get the once cooled cake
out in one piece.


With the paper in place and the pan oiled up use a spoon to apply the cake bottom to the bottom of the pan
but make sure to wet the spoon with water a few times while doing it as without it will be almost impossible
to do.

Use a mixer mixing all the cakefilling ingredients into a homogeneous batter.
Pour a layer of batter on top of the cakebottom and add a layer of appleslices on top of it,
pour another layer of batter on top of the slices etc. etc.

This is a longbaking pie: if you bake it too fast with too much heat the batter will form one big airbubble and you will regret it!

Because of all the moisture this cake needs to bake about 90 to 100 minutes atleast at about 165celcius (for a faster bake increase heat incrementally at your own risk  ;D ) but if you like some more browning stretch it up to about 110 to 120 minutes for the best results but be careful it doesnt get burned because that is the absolute maximum baking time (the cake pictured was at 110 minutes). 

Let the cake cool off completely before (trying) to take it out of the pan, this is an extremely delicate cake when its still warm but will totally firm up after a few hours in the fridge (somewhat comparable to a cheesecake).

Getting the cake out of the pan in once piece is not for the faint of heart therefor it is possible to leave the pan while letting it firm up  (the trade off is the cake slightly sticking to the pan when cold).
All things learned are taken into account.

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #9 on: September 22, 2016, 02:54:16 PM »
Caramelized Honeycrisp Apples in Rough Puff Pastry:


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Offline NYCook

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2016, 06:26:16 PM »
A Mille fuille I think it is called or a crepe cake. Every layer gets a thin schmear of whipped cream, with a layer of jelly every 4th crepe. One of my favs.

Offline invertedisdead

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #11 on: September 26, 2016, 12:29:13 PM »
How long does that take?
the proof is in the pizza

Offline Debora

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #12 on: September 26, 2016, 04:07:17 PM »
A "mille feuilles" is what this is not. Mille feuilles is French and means "thousand layers" which is puff pastry. These are just stacked up pancakes.

Offline NYCook

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #13 on: September 26, 2016, 11:57:12 PM »
How long does that take?

The batter, five minutes to assemble, left overnight in fridge. All the crepes about 10 minutes, but I have 4 pans and a lot of experience. Assembly 10 mins.

Offline NYCook

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #14 on: September 27, 2016, 12:03:41 AM »
A "mille feuilles" is what this is not. Mille feuilles is French and means "thousand layers" which is puff pastry. These are just stacked up pancakes.

You are right and you are wrong. It is actually a Mille Crepe, in my haste I misspoke. My bust. I am not sure if you're joking or just ignorant but what it most definitely is not is "just stacked up pancakes".
« Last Edit: September 27, 2016, 12:23:59 AM by NYCook »

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Offline Debora

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #15 on: September 27, 2016, 04:58:39 AM »
You are right and you are wrong. It is actually a Mille Crepe, in my haste I misspoke. My bust. I am not sure if you're joking or just ignorant but what it most definitely is not is "just stacked up pancakes".

I looked it up and you are right but i never joke about such matters and I am surely not ignorant! In Holland these are just pancakes, which are stacked, a really simple treat that almost every mother bakes for their offspring, we even have "pancake houses" over here. Outside of Holland pancakes are often called 'crepe' which is just the French word for pancakes. I am not mistaking about anything, the translation of "Mille Crepe" is "thousand pancakes" (so yes, stacked pancakes).

Offline the1mu

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #16 on: September 27, 2016, 05:05:53 AM »
And yet, when you say, "stacked pancakes" this is what I think of.


Offline Neopolitan

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #17 on: September 27, 2016, 05:29:57 AM »
I looked it up and you are right but i never joke about such matters and I am surely not ignorant! In Holland these are just pancakes, which are stacked, a really simple treat that almost every mother bakes for their offspring, we even have "pancake houses" over here. Outside of Holland pancakes are often called 'crepe' which is just the French word for pancakes. I am not mistaking about anything, the translation of "Mille Crepe" is "thousand pancakes" (so yes, stacked pancakes).

Halo Debora,

If you want to be specific; A crepe is not at all like a "pannekoek" (Dutch pancake) A "Flensje" is the right comparison. If Crepe is a French word is debatable because Crepe and Gallete are the pride of the Breton culture wich reside in Brittany. These people just like our own Frisians have their own celtic culture of language, music, food and beer indstead of wine! And above al pride.
Would you call the Dutch-Indonesian "Spekkoek" (Sweet layercake) just stacked cakes?
It is a lot of work to make a proper one :chef:

Greetings,

Case

Offline Debora

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #18 on: September 27, 2016, 05:48:24 AM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cr%C3%AApe

Quote
A crêpe or crepe (Listeni/kreɪp/[1] or /krɛp/, French: [kʁɛp] ( listen), Quebec French: [kʁaɪ̯p] ( listen)) is a type of very thin pancake,

A pancake is a pancake, thin or thick doesnt matter, 'flensje' is also just a thin pancake.

Offline NYCook

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Re: Sweets and Desserts
« Reply #19 on: September 27, 2016, 09:13:18 AM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cr%C3%AApe

A pancake is a pancake, thin or thick doesnt matter, 'flensje' is also just a thin pancake.

I understand what you're saying. However, I disagree that "a pancake is a pancake thin or thick it doesn't matter". It does matter. Yes, a consommé is just a soup, but is it? Sure a pâté is just some finely chopped liver, but not really. A pizza is a pizza but thin or thick it definitely matters. The logic doesn't play out. This is really just a semantics issue and a silly one at that. We have pancake houses too. International ones. They are sadly not made from crepes.

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