A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: Wet and dry Gluten  (Read 1644 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline The Pie Express

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 3
  • Location: India
  • I Love Pizza!
Wet and dry Gluten
« on: August 22, 2016, 06:38:54 AM »
I've been reading alot to refine my pizza's, well the end product has been a brilliant one for my liking, with the product available in the market here, I was going through a flour wholesaler's website and the stated below details of the flour

Moisture: 14 % Max
Total Ash: 0.50 % Max
Protein: 11.50 % Min
Wet Gluten: 28% Min
Dry Gluten: 8.50 % Min
Gluten Index: 94% Min
Falling Number- 300-500 Sec Min
Colour: Ceramic White

I'm planning to pick up the flour from this distributor, my first question 1) what are you thought on the specification of the flour and 2) what is the difference between dry gluten and wet gluten ?

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 4791
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
    • Dough Doctor
Re: Wet and dry Gluten
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2016, 01:07:51 PM »
In the U.S. total protein has always been the standard for comparing different flours due to the fact that essentially all of the  hard wheat varieties released for planting have very good gluten forming properties. In Europe where that is not always the case wet or dry gluten (dry being the more accurate) is a preferred method. By this method the Glutomatic instrument (Perten Instruments) is used to develop the gluten in a specified amount of flour and purify the gluten by washing out the starch (this is the "wet" gluten weight), the resulting gluten ball can then be dried to achieve the "dry" gluten weight, where as in the U.S. we report "total" protein, not just the gluten forming proteins (glutenin and gliadin). Because we report total protein content the process of determining the total protein content of the flour can be done in a matter of seconds as opposed to roughly 90-minutes.
The high Falling Number value indicates that the flour is not malted.
The protein content (11.5%) indicates that this is most likely a winter wheat flour (it could have a small amount of spring wheat blended into the grist to attain the desired protein level reported) and it is representative of a very common, typical bread type flour.
I hope this has answered your questions.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

A D V E R T I S E M E N T