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Author Topic: Cold Ferment in the pizza pan or in a ball  (Read 1032 times)

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Offline austinite

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Cold Ferment in the pizza pan or in a ball
« on: February 12, 2017, 11:14:48 AM »
Does anyone have insight on whether cold fermenting spread out in a pizza pan vs in a bowl where one has to then spread it out in a pan to proof before baking matters much?

I have anecdotally found that in a ball and then spread gives bigger holes in the rise but haven't had a big enough sample to say it is reproducible. 

Any insight?

A

Offline HansB

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Re: Cold Ferment in the pizza pan or in a ball
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2017, 11:38:22 AM »
I don't know if the outcome is different but I like to spread the dough in the pan before CF. I get good holes in the crumb with the long RT rise before baking.
Hans

Offline invertedisdead

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Re: Cold Ferment in the pizza pan or in a ball
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2017, 12:56:29 PM »
I would expect better crumb with the extended pan proofing. The less manipulation the better as far as I know, regarding hole structure.
the proof is in the pizza

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Cold Ferment in the pizza pan or in a ball
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2017, 07:15:18 PM »
I like to give the dough several days CF as a dough ball to develop the gluten as well as develop flavor, then open the dough ball into a skin for the pan/deep-dish pizza and allow it to proof/rise in the pan at room temperature for about 30-minutes and then take it to the fridge to CF several more hours. When we do deep-dish pizza I pull my dough balls the evening before we have pizza. I allow the dough to temper at room temperature for an hour or so, then shape it/fit it to the pan and allow to proof/rise at room temperature for 30 to 45-minutes. I then take it to the fridge (piece of foil crimped over the top of the pan to prevent drying) to CF overnight. On the following day, about an hour before I'm ready to dress and bake the pizza I remove it from the fridge and allow it to temper a little (about an hour) then dress and bake the pizza. This gives me a very nice, open crumb structure, with minimum work on my part.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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