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Offline norma427

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Greek oregano
« on: August 25, 2017, 05:43:30 PM »
Had hung the Greek oregano up to dry.  Used some Tuesday for pizzas.  Today put some in a shaker and tasted it.  It sure is potent.  Hung some more Greek oregano up and regular basil. 

Will see what the differences are when dried.

Norma

Offline norma427

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Re: Greek oregano
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2017, 08:42:07 PM »
Oregano was mostly dried till today.  Tasted the regular oregano and it doesn't have a distinctive flavor.  Comparison photo with the Greek oregano and the oregano I really like.

Norma

Offline slagathor

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Re: Greek oregano
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2017, 12:15:11 AM »
Nice pix norma. So my experience with Oregano is limited to growing Greek and Italian varieties, with the Greek the clear winner in taste after drying for me. I have tried the Sicilian packaged Oregano but my experience is that the flavor was very mild. Could have been old stock. Also mostly flowers and stems and few leaves. Wonder if you could scavenge some seed from the flower buds in the package to grow out?  ???  Now I'm gonna have to rummage through the spice drawer for an old bag of the Sicilian herbs to look for seeds!  :)
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Offline norma427

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Re: Greek oregano
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2017, 06:37:08 AM »
Nice pix norma. So my experience with Oregano is limited to growing Greek and Italian varieties, with the Greek the clear winner in taste after drying for me. I have tried the Sicilian packaged Oregano but my experience is that the flavor was very mild. Could have been old stock. Also mostly flowers and stems and few leaves. Wonder if you could scavenge some seed from the flower buds in the package to grow out?  ???  Now I'm gonna have to rummage through the spice drawer for an old bag of the Sicilian herbs to look for seeds!  :)

slagathor,

Thanks for telling what your experience was from growing Greek and Italian varieties, and Greek being the clear winner.  In the photo I posted the other oregano is very good, but hard to find, but still not as strong as the Greek. 

I did try to plant what I thought were seeds from the other good oregano, but they never grew.  Hope you have better luck than I did.  Report back if you have good results.  :)

Think next year am going to look on the web for better Sicilian seeds.

Norma

Offline slagathor

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Re: Greek oregano
« Reply #4 on: September 20, 2017, 03:19:10 PM »
Hey norma427!

I looked very carefully through the stuff at the bottom of an old bag of Sicilian oregano and I know what Oregano seeds look like, but even with glasses these old eyes didn't see anything that looked like seeds. Just herb crumbs. I also read that some Sicilian Oreganos are hybrids of Oregano and Marjoram cultivars and are sterile. So I kept looking and found these Sicilian Oregano plants.

http://companionplants.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=1391

Gonna give em a try this year along side the Italian and Greek I have growing.

Thanks for the inspiration to try growing the Sicilian this year! And although you probably already know, just in case you don't, Mexican Mint Marigold is an awesome herb that I don't think enough people know about.

Cheers, and happy growing!

 
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Offline norma427

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Re: Greek oregano
« Reply #5 on: September 20, 2017, 07:59:13 PM »
Hey norma427!

I looked very carefully through the stuff at the bottom of an old bag of Sicilian oregano and I know what Oregano seeds look like, but even with glasses these old eyes didn't see anything that looked like seeds. Just herb crumbs. I also read that some Sicilian Oreganos are hybrids of Oregano and Marjoram cultivars and are sterile. So I kept looking and found these Sicilian Oregano plants.

http://companionplants.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=1391

Gonna give em a try this year along side the Italian and Greek I have growing.

Thanks for the inspiration to try growing the Sicilian this year! And although you probably already know, just in case you don't, Mexican Mint Marigold is an awesome herb that I don't think enough people know about.

Cheers, and happy growing!

slagathor,

Sorry to hear you didn't find any seeds in your old bag of Sicilian oregano.  I didn't know some Sicilian oreganos are hybrids of Oregano and Marjoram cultivars and then are sterile.  Maybe didn't recall though.

The Sicilian Oregano plants you found look very good.  Let us know what they taste like.  Didn't know Mexican Mint Marigold is an awesome herb.

BTW, yesterday a man come to market that was there last week.  He came to purchase two pizzas for some of his customers.  He is a farmer and is Joe Beddia's supplier for fresh ingredients for his pizzas.  He also is a good friend with Joe and has been since they were young.  I asked the man about the Sicilian oregano he grows and dries.  He said come to his farm and I can try some.  He only lives about 5 miles away from where I live.  Should be interesting to taste his Sicilian oregano and maybe purchase some some of his veggies and other things he grows. He grows other herbs too.  He told me the story about the Marijuana-Infused Pizza he had.  That was a funny story.

I let him taste the Greek oregano that was dried at market.  He said it had a great taste and a nice kick after it was eaten.


Norma

Offline norma427

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Re: Greek oregano
« Reply #6 on: September 20, 2017, 08:11:07 PM »

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