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Author Topic: Dough Ball sizes for Papa John's, Domino's, Pizza Hut, etc...  (Read 976 times)

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Offline Ric Clint

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Dough Ball sizes for Papa John's, Domino's, Pizza Hut, etc...
« on: February 15, 2018, 11:59:18 AM »
Just trying to get an idea of what some of these chains use for their Hand-Tossed pizzas for comparison reasons.

I read that Mellow Mushroom uses:
10" = 12oz
14" = 18oz
16" = 24oz

Does anybody know what some of the chains use for their:
Medium 12"
Large 14"
X-Large 16"


Thanks!


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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Dough Ball sizes for Papa John's, Domino's, Pizza Hut, etc...
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2018, 12:50:56 PM »
Just trying to get an idea of what some of these chains use for their Hand-Tossed pizzas for comparison reasons.

I read that Mellow Mushroom uses:
10" = 12oz
14" = 18oz
16" = 24oz

Does anybody know what some of the chains use for their:
Medium 12"
Large 14"
X-Large 16"


Thanks!
Ric Clint,

You would think that the answers to your question would be readily available. However, when I tried to answer your same questions for the chains you mentioned, I got many different answers, even from members who said they worked for the chains in question.

To give you an idea as to some of the many answers I got, I suggest that you go to the following Papa John's and Mellow Mushroom clone threads, go to the search box at the top right hand side of the page (to the left of the This topic item in the pulldown menu), enter the words "dough ball weights Peter" (without the quotes), and hit the search button:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.0 (Papa John's)

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=3940.0 (Mellow Mushroom)

With respect to Domino's, you might take a look at this post:

Reply 15 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=31354.msg312834;topicseen#msg312834.

Maybe other members seeing your post have more recent insights into the question you posed.

Peter

Offline Ric Clint

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Re: Dough Ball sizes for Papa John's, Domino's, Pizza Hut, etc...
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2018, 01:50:13 PM »
Thanks for the response!

I haven't had a chance to read all of the post yet, but in this link:
https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.msg58196#msg58196

You said the following: "I have concluded that the hydration for PJ doughs is low relative to the rated absorption of the flour used (typically a high protein flour). I would estimate a hydration of around 55-58%. Dough balls in this hydration range will be fairly easy to shape and stretch, slap and toss, and experience few extensibility problems."

Does that mean that for example if I am using about 60% Water, that if I use less Water and drop it to 55%, that the dough will be easier to stretch and shape? Like for example, if I'm making a small batch of dough using only 10lbs of All Trumps High Gluten Flour (100%) and 6lbs of Water at 75* degrees (60%)... if I take and drop that Water to say 55% which is 5.5lbs... would that make the dough more easily to shape and stretch?

Thanks!



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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Dough Ball sizes for Papa John's, Domino's, Pizza Hut, etc...
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2018, 12:16:27 PM »
Ric Clint,

Most commercially milled white flours have a rated absorption rate that is related to the protein content of the flours, although not many millers publish that data. For example, as I noted in the thread at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4646.msg39204;topicseen#msg39204, the King Arthur all purpose, bread and high gluten flours have rated absorption values of 61%, 62% and 63% (all +/-2%), respectively. For hydration purposes, those values are a good starting point for those flours. In fact, those are pretty good starting points for other similar flours for which no rated absorption values are stated.

However, most flours can usually tolerate hydration values that are outside of the above ranges. For example, pizza operators in NYC that specialize in the NY style of pizza often use a high gluten flour such as the All Trumps. That flour has a protein value of around 14-14.2% (much like the King Arthur KASL) and has an absorption value of around 63%. But many operators choose to use a much lower hydration value, such as 57-60%. In fact, it can be as low as 55%, as I learned recently on another thread. All else being equal, the doughs made with the lower hydration values will usually be easier to handle. This can be important if the workers assembling the pizzas are not particularly skilled at working with high hydration doughs or where turnover is high. The lower hydration values also makes it unnecessary to use pizza screens to load the dressed pizzas into the oven, which some pizza operators do when using unskilled labor, even when using deck ovens.

Another point to keep in mind is that many of the chains that specialize in American style pizzas use a lot of oil in their doughs. Although the oils do not act to hydrate the flour, they do contribute wetness to the dough, making the dough softer yet still easy to handle. Normally, one will use a combination of hydration and oil values (in percents) to be reasonably close to the rated absorption value of the flour used.

As a final thought, I should add that some flours are milled from certain wheat grains that call for higher than normal hydration values. A good example of this are the flours from a miller that is now a part of Grain Craft but was formerly called Pendleton Mills. Note, for example, page 5 of this former Pendleton brochure:

https://web.archive.org/web/20141109232607/http://www.pfmills.com/filebin/pdf/technical_informational_booklet_v1-opt.pdf

Peter


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