A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: Da Michele Dough  (Read 9018 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline hotsawce

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2158
Da Michele Dough
« on: June 16, 2018, 01:15:06 PM »
Iíve tried digging through some threads on the Da Michele process but havenít seen much in regard to the fermentation. In the dough videos, we see the finished dough being tossed into a steel trough for what I can only assume is bulk fermentation.

Does anyone know how long they bulk ferment for before balling and using?

Offline pizzadaheim

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 331
  • Location: Germany
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2018, 01:20:40 AM »
From my experience ; 12/16 hours bulk, 3/5 hours second fermentation. With very very little amount of fresh yeast (probably under 0.25gr / 1liter of Water) with high hydro. No refr. Only cellar .  Thats why their cornicione doesnt get big and puffy but with black spots. Little bit underfermented dough my opinion

Offline ebpizza

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 574
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2018, 09:01:29 PM »
I would assume that the long bulk rise is in a temp controlled room around 65F? Also is it possible to open a dough with such a short second rise of just 3 hrs?

I ask because i have a difficult time with long bulk rise (10hr) where the balls are unmanageable on their 8th hr. I prefer all room temp. My issue is that the 2nd rise in balls is during the day when the room temp is around 70F.

So Iím curious if I can do just a 3hr in ball after a 10hr bulk.

I guess I could lessen my yeast.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2018, 09:22:03 PM by ebpizza »

Offline jsaras

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 3108
  • Location: Camarillo, CA
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2018, 10:34:38 PM »
Iíve tried digging through some threads on the Da Michele process but havenít seen much in regard to the fermentation. In the dough videos, we see the finished dough being tossed into a steel trough for what I can only assume is bulk fermentation.

Does anyone know how long they bulk ferment for before balling and using?

Their dough is one thing, but the fast bake is what set it apart from the other Neapolitan pizzas Iíve had.  Their tomato sauce was so good that itís depressing me.
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline Arne_Jervell

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 423
  • Location: Norway
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2018, 04:02:15 AM »
Their tomato sauce was so good that itís depressing me.

I couldn't agree more. Man it's so good!

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline rdbedwards

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 372
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Olympia, WA
  • Happiness is a perfectly baked Neapolitan pie
    • Boathouse Brewery
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2018, 02:39:58 PM »
Others have also praised the Da Michele sauce.  They are reported to use Solea canned tomatoes, which seem to be available in the US, though expensive.  Cheaper than a trip to Naples though!
Sunjoy Killington (aka Member's Mark) WFO
Pizza Party Ardore (propane with Saputo)

Offline fornographer

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 273
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2018, 06:27:10 PM »
Please describe the taste of the Da Michele sauce  :drool:

Offline jsaras

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 3108
  • Location: Camarillo, CA
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2018, 06:49:48 PM »
Please describe the taste of the Da Michele sauce  :drool:

Tomatoes from God?
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline HansB

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 4018
  • Location: Detroit, MI
    • 500px
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2018, 09:44:00 PM »
Hans

Offline invertedisdead

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 4571
  • Rest In Pizza
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #9 on: July 17, 2018, 11:00:12 PM »
I've never been, but I would imagine the fast bake is partially why the tomatoes taste so good? A plain tomato sauce never tastes eye rolling good on a 8 minute bake to me like it can on a sub 90s bake. Also they don't use EVOO like most shops. I think its sunflower oil?
the proof is in the pizza

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline jsaras

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 3108
  • Location: Camarillo, CA
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #10 on: July 17, 2018, 11:35:12 PM »
When I spoke to the folks at the Florence location, they indicated that they used some EVOO before the bake and "seed oil" after the bake.  However, when I went to the Rome location, "seed oil" was explicitly listed on the menu.  it's very possible I was getting some misdirection in Florence.

The ultra-quick bake may have something to do with retaining the flavor.  It's difficult enough to get a sub 2-minute Neapolitan at most places and it was my first sub 1-minute pizzas that I've had.  Craig mentioned that there is a noticeable positive difference with quick Neo bakes, and I'm very inclined to believe him now....not that I didn't believe him before.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2018, 11:39:36 PM by jsaras »
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline ebpizza

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 574
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #11 on: July 18, 2018, 07:24:24 AM »
In this video, I believe he is saying that they donít use salt in the sauce.  Also the oil is very clear, so unlikely olive oil. I do believe it is sunflower



Offline Heikjo

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 767
  • Location: Oslo, Norway
  • A sour dough makes a happy me
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #12 on: July 18, 2018, 07:37:57 AM »
I was at da Michele a week ago and it looks like sunflower or something similarly yellow, yes. The taste in the sauce primarily comes from the great tomatoes they got in Italy. I don't know which they use, but it was unlike anything I've found home. So tasteful, sweet and acidic. With tomatoes like that, you dont need to do much with them before adding to the pie. Salt might not be necessary if they get some salt from the mozzarella and parmesan.
-Heine. Mostly Neapolitan sourdough pizzas in an electric Effeuno P134H.

Offline sub

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1176
  • Location: Belgium
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #13 on: July 18, 2018, 08:19:00 AM »
In this video, I believe he is saying that they donít use salt in the sauce.  Also the oil is very clear, so unlikely olive oil. I do believe it is sunflower
It's soybean oil.



Salt might not be necessary if they get some salt from the mozzarella and parmesan.

from the pecorino romano.

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 28602
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #14 on: July 18, 2018, 08:54:48 AM »
What sub says about the use of soybean oil at Da Michele was confirmed many years ago by Marco (pizzanapoletana), at Reply 24 at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=656.msg11520;topicseen#msg11520

Peter

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline invertedisdead

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 4571
  • Rest In Pizza
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #15 on: July 18, 2018, 10:33:52 AM »
When I spoke to the folks at the Florence location, they indicated that they used some EVOO before the bake and "seed oil" after the bake.  However, when I went to the Rome location, "seed oil" was explicitly listed on the menu.  it's very possible I was getting some misdirection in Florence.

The ultra-quick bake may have something to do with retaining the flavor.  It's difficult enough to get a sub 2-minute Neapolitan at most places and it was my first sub 1-minute pizzas that I've had.  Craig mentioned that there is a noticeable positive difference with quick Neo bakes, and I'm very inclined to believe him now....not that I didn't believe him before.

The neutral oil makes sense to me for carrying those delicate flavors, IMO I've ruined more than a few pies with overpowering EVOO.
the proof is in the pizza

Offline schold

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 687
  • Location: Norway
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #16 on: July 18, 2018, 01:39:11 PM »
I think the most commonly espoused reason for their use of soybean oil is correct: It's about economy, not gastronomy.
Cooking is not a recipe, it's a philosophy - unless it's pastry, then it's chemistry.

- Marco Pierre White

Offline apreti

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 14
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #17 on: July 24, 2018, 12:30:54 PM »
Others have also praised the Da Michele sauce.  They are reported to use Solea canned tomatoes, which seem to be available in the US, though expensive.  Cheaper than a trip to Naples though!


The sauce in the video looks like a passata - total puree, no sign of pieces or seeds - does anyone have an idea as to how they make their sauce?

Offline rdbedwards

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 372
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Olympia, WA
  • Happiness is a perfectly baked Neapolitan pie
    • Boathouse Brewery
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #18 on: July 24, 2018, 02:06:43 PM »
You can watch a video of how they make their sauce here, starting at about 6:20:

https://slice.seriouseats.com/2011/03/watch-this-great-video-shot-at-antica-pizzeria-da-michele-in-naples.html

Perhaps we can get a translation of what Condurro is saying about it?  The auto-translate to English is gibberish.
Sunjoy Killington (aka Member's Mark) WFO
Pizza Party Ardore (propane with Saputo)

Offline sub

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1176
  • Location: Belgium
Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #19 on: July 24, 2018, 02:07:19 PM »
They use peeled Solea tomatoes blended in a bucket with a big immersion blender

https://youtu.be/3pxmIFz5914?t=6m18s

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


 

wordpress