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Author Topic: Uuni Pro Journey Continues  (Read 19756 times)

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Offline rdbedwards

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Re: Uuni Pro Journey Continues
« Reply #240 on: July 03, 2019, 07:41:11 PM »
The first thing that I do when I get a new firelighter is to remove the child safety lock so that I don't have to have three hands to get it to light.
Sunjoy Killington (aka Member's Mark) WFO
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Offline JimInPT

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Re: Uuni Pro Journey Continues
« Reply #241 on: July 03, 2019, 08:30:11 PM »
All these silly nanny things do is attempt to thwart Darwin, thus enabling a lot of dullards to keep going for a while longer until they manage to do some SERIOUS damage.   >:(

Offline Packard_Goose

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Re: Uuni Pro Journey Continues
« Reply #242 on: July 08, 2019, 11:10:38 PM »
That listing didn't appear a while back when I was searching.  Even with shipping, that's a better price if you're only going to need/keep one unit - good find! 

It seems that opening the tank valve slowly makes a difference - I think if you crank it open quickly, the safety-valve "thinks" it's wide open to the atmosphere and slams shut, preventing gas flow.

I hate this stupid Nanny State junk that makes life more inconvenient; if I can find a way to defeat that stupid thing, I will.  Like setting up for bypassing a lawnmower's shutoff bar with a wiretie as soon as it comes out of the box.
Those tips definitely seem to make a difference. Opening the tank valve slowly may be the difference. Hopefully it continues to work well.

Got my stainless sheet today as well and it fits great, pics attached.

Made two pizzas last night (pictured), a Margherita, and a “Keste” from Keste in Greenwich Village, which is basically a Margherita topped after cooking with arugula, prosciutto, and shaved pecorino. Very tasty.

I have two more balls of dough left over, which means pizza again tonight. I’ll probably make a Margherita with sausage, and for the other I’m thinking of trying to do an authentic Neapolitan calzone with ricotta, mozzarella, basil, and strips of salami inside, tomato and olive oil on top. Looks fairly easy to execute, but the challenge in the Uuni Pro will be getting the oven at the right temp since it needs to cook about twice as long apparently. In a brick oven this is done by placing the calzone in the mouth of the oven rather than near the fire, but that temperature differential isn’t as drastic in the Uuni. I’m thinking I’ll turn the gas to low after the pizza cooks and remove the “pizza door” to let the deck cool so it doesn’t burn on the bottom, then turn the flame up a hair again when I launched the calzone. Fingers crossed.

Offline Packard_Goose

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Re: Uuni Pro Journey Continues
« Reply #243 on: July 09, 2019, 01:40:59 AM »
Calzone was a pretty solid result for my first try. I may have actually had the oven just a hair too cool, and my ricotta was cold from the fridge, not room temp, which was a mistake, but all in all a success.

Offline ptix

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Re: Uuni Pro Journey Continues
« Reply #244 on: August 27, 2019, 08:24:21 PM »
So last summer I bought the Uuni Pro and although I made good pizzas in our home oven, I found out the hard way that it doesn't translate to wood fired. With help from this forum, I resolved most of my problems and this summer I was more successful on the Pro.  There are still 2 issues I need help with however. (incidentally, I am using Caputo flour at 60% hydration, 260 gram balls.)  First, although the rim is done, it seems the dough inside isn't quite done even though the bottom is nicely done.  Would it be that the dough is a little thicker than it should be and if so how do I tell that it is the right thickness - what should the diameter of a pie at this many grams be ?  Also, can people describe their successful baking procedures - how long do you wait until the bottom has the right char before you lift it on the peel to turn/finish it ?  Thanks.     
« Last Edit: August 28, 2019, 07:49:12 AM by ptix »

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Offline JimInPT

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Re: Uuni Pro Journey Continues
« Reply #245 on: September 01, 2019, 12:17:24 PM »
So last summer I bought the Uuni Pro and although I made good pizzas in our home oven, I found out the hard way that it doesn't translate to wood fired. With help from this forum, I resolved most of my problems and this summer I was more successful on the Pro.  There are still 2 issues I need help with however. (incidentally, I am using Caputo flour at 60% hydration, 260 gram balls.)  First, although the rim is done, it seems the dough inside isn't quite done even though the bottom is nicely done.  Would it be that the dough is a little thicker than it should be and if so how do I tell that it is the right thickness - what should the diameter of a pie at this many grams be ?  Also, can people describe their successful baking procedures - how long do you wait until the bottom has the right char before you lift it on the peel to turn/finish it ?  Thanks.     

Yes, you've found out the Uuni Pro cooks differently from a home oven - it's not just the higher heat, but also the direct radiation from the flames passing over the crust (which is critical to getting a Neapolitan crust right).  If you've made good pizzas in your home oven, you'll make great ones in the Uuni Pro.

For that size dough ball, you should press out a crust about 12-13" diameter; I use 275-300g at 67% hydration with Caputo pizza 00 and mine are that size.  If you don't have a good infrared thermometer yet, get one; it's important to get roof and stone temps correct and consistent for your methods and recipes.  I preheat to roof 950F and stone 750F to get the crust and toppings cooked together in about 90 seconds, but ranging from 70 to 120 seconds depending on thickness and toppings.  Be patient to make sure the stones are hot enough; for me anything under 700F yields an undercooked crust, so I wait.

I run my Uuni Pro with gas now because it spoiled me (and the pizza isn't in the oven long enough to benefit from wood-smoke flavor) but these apply for wood and charcoal as well.  Make sure you have a live flame on the roof, not just glowing coals, when you launch the pizza onto the stones; a tiny piece of wood is all you need for a couple minutes flame.  I still use wood and smoker pellets for longer cooks like NY style pizza at lower temps, steaks, tandoori chicken etc which can pick up the flavor.

I launch, wait 30 seconds to set the bottom of the crust, turn 180 degrees, another 20 seconds, turn 90 degrees, another 20 seconds and one more 180-degree turn for another 15-20 seconds.  This method works very well for me and gives repeatable results.  Keep a close eye on it; things happen awfully fast at these temps as you've discovered.  I highly recommend the Thermoworks TimeStick Trio timer to keep track for you; it's an extremely useful tool.

Happy pizza making!  :chef:
« Last Edit: September 01, 2019, 12:28:01 PM by JimInPT »

Offline Packard_Goose

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Re: Uuni Pro Journey Continues
« Reply #246 on: September 01, 2019, 02:01:51 PM »
Size also depends on how large a crust/cornicione you form. My dough balls are usually about 240g at 65% hydration and make a 12” pizza with about a 3/4” cornicione. I think my bakes are a little hotter than JimInPT’s, usually 800+ on the deck, and they are done in about 60-70 seconds total. 20 seconds to set, turn 180 degrees, 15 seconds then turn 90 degrees, another 15 seconds turn 180, another 10-15 seconds and it’s done. This varies depending on toppings too. A white pizza without the super wet tomato sauce is usually done faster, whereas a Marinara with a generous coating of tomato sauce takes a few seconds longer. Times above are approximate for a Margherita.

Offline mikeoz

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Re: Uuni Pro Journey Continues
« Reply #247 on: September 17, 2019, 11:44:28 PM »
I'm cooking NP with good success with the gas burner. Any further thoughts from users on using the glass door (in gas mode), and on vent configurations?
I'll be confident when I'm using wood but for weeknights and quicker cookups the gas is a godsend. I'd really like to use the larger door for putting in whole loaves and larger pots -- tricky with the pizza door.

Offline Irishboy

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Re: Uuni Pro Journey Continues
« Reply #248 on: September 29, 2019, 04:27:18 PM »


Two nights ago I finally hit a 90-second pizza again after being in a 2-minute rut because I was too impatient to hit the right deck temp.  At those temps, I turn it 180 degrees after 20-30 seconds, depending on how close the back edge is to the fire; it will scorch quickly if you leave it in too long.  Then, I turn 90 degrees after another 20 seconds and finally another 180 degrees 20 seconds or so after that.  That will give you a full 360-degree exposure in all quadrants - I think the first turn should be 180 to get that back edge to the front to give it a break; it's sitting there the longest to set the bottom of the crust so you can then turn it, but as a result is going to be on the edge of scorching if you're not careful, so I move it to the front on the first turn to cool down a bit.



Great tip I am definitely going to put into effect,


Thanks for the great post
Josh

Offline JimInPT

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Re: Uuni Pro Journey Continues
« Reply #249 on: September 29, 2019, 05:06:24 PM »
I'm cooking NP with good success with the gas burner. Any further thoughts from users on using the glass door (in gas mode), and on vent configurations?
I'll be confident when I'm using wood but for weeknights and quicker cookups the gas is a godsend. I'd really like to use the larger door for putting in whole loaves and larger pots -- tricky with the pizza door.

I don't think you want to use the glass door with gas, because you'll want the exhaust stack closed to retain as much heat as possible - with the glass door in place and stack closed the gas burner won't be able to breathe very well, nor will there be good airflow of the hot gasses from back to front.

I get the desire to have a larger opening, though, for tall pizzas, bread etc.  Maybe you could walk on the wild side; leave the pizza door in place while heating and baking, but don't engage the safety latches, just lift it off to insert/remove the food - you'll need some of those high-temp Nomex gloves for that maneuver and will need to make sure it's hung in place properly so it doesn't fall off.  Something that hot is pretty dangerous, so you need to be mindful of that.

The Uuni guys will cringe at this advice, but there you go.   :-X

For the short Neapolitan cook time, there's no difference between wood and gas - it's not in there long enough to pick up any smoke flavor.  In fact, since I installed the gas burner I haven't used wood once for pizza, but that's mostly because I've been doing only quick-cook Neapolitans.  For lower-temp longer cooks like New York or similar, the wood smoke can add flavor over 6-10 minutes.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2019, 05:10:01 PM by JimInPT »

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