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Author Topic: Da Michele Dough  (Read 10128 times)

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Offline apreti

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #20 on: July 24, 2018, 07:54:34 PM »
Quote
Perhaps we can get a translation of what Condurro is saying about it?  The auto-translate to English is gibberish.

Thanks for the link.   Translation:

We use peeled San Marzanos that are prepared (better: produced) just for us [although it’s not clear to me what this can possibly mean], and in which there’s little water, in fact, we don’t add water at all.  We open the cans, as you can see, and we pour the contents into the buckets, and then mix so as to produce a homogeneous sauce that is ready to be applied to the pizza. 




Offline apreti

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #21 on: July 24, 2018, 08:00:56 PM »
I didn't realize this, but according to Condurro, they use only old dough for fermentation, except in the winter where they'll get some help from a very small amount fresh yeast.

Offline ebpizza

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #22 on: July 28, 2018, 10:09:01 PM »
From the first video




What’s interesting, if my translation is correct, they use San Marzano tomatoes from outside of the DOP region,  from Santa Maria Castellabate in the Cilento region, just south of Naples.

Which only goes to prove that there are excellent tomatoes from that region which are not official San Marzano.

He also says that the dough was make the day before at 3pm for that morning .
No salt in the tomatoes.  They only add salt to the Marinara pizza,  no need for salt on the margarita because pecorino is salty already.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2018, 10:51:53 PM by ebpizza »

Offline ebpizza

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #23 on: July 29, 2018, 08:26:07 AM »
ok, it's my hearing not translation that is poor. He must have said Santa Maria la Carità

https://soleafood.com/collections/tomatoes/products/pomodori-pelati-italiani

And based on this map, Santa Maria la Carita is within the DOP:

https://www.cento.com/brands/cento/san-marzano.php


From what I can tell from the packaging, the tomatoes are not DOP and may not even be San Marzano, which in my opinion doesn't matter, as long as they taste good.



« Last Edit: July 29, 2018, 08:28:13 AM by ebpizza »

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #24 on: August 03, 2018, 11:30:29 AM »
I think a lot of their look comes from high heat. This is a 63%, [email protected], 0.024%IDY baked at 950F for about 35 seconds. Second pie is Da Michele for comparison.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2018, 11:37:03 AM by TXCraig1 »
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #25 on: August 03, 2018, 11:48:55 AM »
Also, one of the reasons a Margheria is my favorite pies is that, when 'properly made' every bite is not the same. You get some bites with sauce and cheese - some with sauce, cheese, and basil - some with sauce only, etc. Recently, I was looking a picture of a Da Machele pie, and it dawned on me that I had been missing the obvious all these years - I generally didn't have places with just crust and oil (and salt which I sprinkle over the whole pie just before baking. Those sections are almost like a bread stick. Doing this intentionally was a major step forward in my pizza. It's not something you see a lot, and I think it may be one reason, that nobody realizes, why people like Da Michele so much.
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Offline fexxi

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #26 on: August 03, 2018, 12:26:31 PM »
Looks great! Was it equally soft?

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #27 on: August 03, 2018, 12:38:54 PM »
Looks great! Was it equally soft?

It was very soft. I've never been to DM, so I can't compare.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #28 on: August 03, 2018, 03:05:42 PM »
Craig, I'll take yours please  :) 

Offline Arne_Jervell

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #29 on: August 04, 2018, 06:17:29 AM »
Craig, I'll take yours please  :)
I'll take them both, thank you! :-D

In my opinion, a Da Michele pie tastes *way* better than it looks.

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Offline deb415611

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #30 on: August 04, 2018, 11:16:14 AM »
Deb

Offline spaddl

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #31 on: August 05, 2018, 04:42:53 AM »
@TXCraig1
I have a question, how do you get your pizza to be that brown?
Most of the time when I do short bakes, 40-50secs, I have a pretty pale dough with lots of black dots, sometimes it also happenes that it's doughy in the inside of the rim (not cooked through) but the outside almost burned.
I would think the problem might be my stretching skills and fermentation not being optimal, but I can't really define what's going wrong there.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #32 on: August 05, 2018, 08:18:29 AM »
@TXCraig1
I have a question, how do you get your pizza to be that brown?
Most of the time when I do short bakes, 40-50secs, I have a pretty pale dough with lots of black dots, sometimes it also happenes that it's doughy in the inside of the rim (not cooked through) but the outside almost burned.
I would think the problem might be my stretching skills and fermentation not being optimal, but I can't really define what's going wrong there.

I think sufficient top heat is the most important factor: low dome, rolling flame, etc. When I use my Acunto, I keep a log burning and flame rolling across the top of the tome. In the Pizza Party, the gas flame is on high and the top is glowing red. I think room temperature fermentation is also important to even browning. Cold ferments seem to lean more towards the high-contrast (black on white) leoparding.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Offline Heikjo

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #33 on: August 05, 2018, 10:14:00 AM »
Is consistent dough temp when opening into skins important on low bake times? Does 10º C make more of a difference (if it makes any) than it would on a NY style with 6-8 minutes bake time? For instance if you ferment at 18C and open one dough straight from the fermentation box and let another one get up to 25º C before opening.
-Heine. Mostly Neapolitan sourdough pizzas in an electric Effeuno P134H.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #34 on: August 05, 2018, 02:56:05 PM »
I don't know. I know that I don't like working with warm or cold dough, so my dough is generally 70ish.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Offline ebpizza

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #35 on: February 15, 2019, 06:57:55 AM »
New video released today. While only a home recipe was provided, it did provide some interesting info about their process: Bulk 24h / Ball 4-5h and balls are about 300-320g.


« Last Edit: February 15, 2019, 07:03:12 AM by ebpizza »

Online jsaras

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #36 on: February 15, 2019, 09:42:18 AM »
New video released today. While only a home recipe was provided, it did provide some interesting info about their process: Bulk 24h / Ball 4-5h and balls are about 300-320g.




...and 40 second bakes!!
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline Rolls

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #37 on: February 15, 2019, 10:29:18 AM »
Thanks to ebpizza for posting the video. Here's the rundown in English:
  • 100% 00 Flour (Caputo Pizzeria blue bag)
  • 50% Water - more added if needed
  • 3% Salt
  • 0.5% Compressed Yeast - for 12 hour fermentation

Water (temperature unspecified) is placed in mixing bowl of a fork mixer to which the salt and yeast are added. Flour is added gradually until the desired consistency or "punto di pasta" is reached. This can take up to 40 minutes in the fork mixer. The dough will have a satiny appearance and show some elasticity when handled. The dough is bulk fermented (temperature unspecified) for 24 hours in what appears to be a dough trough. The dough is hand portioned into 300-320 g pieces and formed into balls and proofed for 4-5 hrs (temperature unspecified) in plastic dough trays. The dough balls are stretched into skins, dressed and baked in the WFO (500°C) for about 40 seconds.

Toppings for Margherita:
Pomodoro Campano
Fior di latte D'Agerola
Olio di Semi (seed oil)
Pecorino Romano

Toppings for Marinara:
Pomodoro Campano
Aglio (garlic)
Origano
Olio di Semi (seed oil)

Note:  The instructions for the home recipe are to use 5 g of CY per kilo of flour for a 12 hour bulk fermentation. In the pizzeria, the dough is fermented for 24 hours but the yeast quantity is not really specified.


Rolls
« Last Edit: February 15, 2019, 12:55:48 PM by Rolls »
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Offline mmille24

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #38 on: February 15, 2019, 11:14:39 AM »
50% water?!?!?

That's it?

Offline ebpizza

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Re: Da Michele Dough
« Reply #39 on: February 15, 2019, 11:53:29 AM »
I think any reference to a recipe he gives is for home use. He probably was guessing on the water amount for the home. Keep in mind these videos are to promote Caputo flour for home use, so that is their targeted audience.  They probably just guess.

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