A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: Keeping liquid starter in the fridge.  (Read 475 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline amolapizza

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1207
  • Location: Luxembourg / Spain
  • If pizza is food for the gods, what are we..
Keeping liquid starter in the fridge.
« on: July 31, 2018, 07:57:30 AM »
This is slightly off topic since I've only tried making pizza a couple of times with my starter, and normally bake bread with it. But, I sincerely do intend to try it for making pizza too :)

I'm very much a noob to sourdough and made my own starter about half a year ago following Bonci's instructions in this video:

I used to keep it on the counter and feed it every 2 days for the first few months, after watching the video again I noticed that Bonci said to keep it in the fridge, take it out to feed it, put it back into the fridge and use it 24 hours later.  This is exactly what I've been doing (though maybe I let it go 26-27 hours which is the point where it has peaked and start falling again.  Normally I use it once a week, but I make a point at feeding it at least 2 times a week.  Once for baking and once in the middle, just to keep it going.

So I'd feed it, then next day take it out and use instead of poolish in my normal bread.

Though lately I've come to the understanding that people normally don't treat their starter like this.  It seems the majority put it in the fridge for longer storage, and when they need it they take it out and refresh it a couple of times before using.

The starter itself smells slightly sour but doesn't really give a pronounced taste to my bread.  I can however taste that it's different to yeast based bread and I like how the texture of the bread comes out when using my starter.

I'm interested in feedback on what I'm doing and why that might be wrong.  So far I'm more than pleased with the results for my bread.  Though if everyone else is doing it differently, then I wonder what I might be missing out on and if I should go back to keeping it outside of the fridge and feeding it every second day.

As a curious side note, the last 6-7 weeks there has been a distinct smell/aroma of cinnamon when mixing my dough and also in the finished bread, though I've never really smelt it from the starter alone..  Though this might be a thing of the past, as this weekend I could hardly detect it when baking.
Jack

Effeuno P134H (500C), Biscotto Fornace Saputo, Sunmix Sun6, Caputo Pizzeria, Caputo Saccorosso, Mutti Pelati.

Offline Heikjo

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 869
  • Location: Oslo, Norway
  • A sour dough makes a happy me
Re: Keeping liquid starter in the fridge.
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2018, 12:52:22 PM »
    Preface: I'm here assuming a 100% hydration starter with whatever flour you prefer.

    First a few words on how a starter works. When you feed the starter, you introduce fresh food for the bacteria and they will start eating and letting off gas which is what makes the starter rise. There are primarily two key properties that determine how long after a feeding the starter peak. That's inoculation and temperature. Inoculation means how much of the old starter you keep, relative to how much you feed it with.

Inoculation

If you kept 10g of the starter and fed it 50g flour and 50g water, that equates to a feeding ratio of 1:5:5 (seed:flour:water). This would be a 20% inoculation since 1 divided by 5 is 0.2, ie. 20%. If you feed it at a ratio of 1:10:10, the inoculation is 10%, and 1:3:3 would be 33%. The more seed you use (in percent), the faster it will rise.

Temperature

Temperature is something anyone making bread and pizza has to take into consideration. A bread or pizza made in February might need a different routine than one made in July. With starters, the activity after feeding is dependent on the temperature it's stored at. Higher temperature means more activity and that it will be ready sooner.

The two most common ways to keep your starter that I've seen:

  • On the counter: The starter is always stored on the counter and usually used daily or every other day. It is fed daily or even twice a day. This is most common for bakeries and anyone making larger amounts of sourdough doughs.
  • In the fridge:
For most of us we use it 1-3 times a week and don't want to standing on the counter all day long, nor is it needed since it's not used as often. It is very common to keep it in the fridge between use, and take it out for a refresh one time before use. If you use it weekly, you don't have to refresh it more than once. For me, I typically take it out on the evening, feed it, leave it on the counter and use the starter the next morning.
[/list]

I haven't tried putting it in the fridge, but I suppose it can work. You can try letting it rise on the counter one time and see how long it takes to peak and if it peaks at the same height as in the fridge.

As always, experience is what matters. You have to find out what routine and procedure works best for you.

You can also use the starter at different times after feeding. If you use it early, the dough might need to ferment more and you get less tang. You can also use it for hours after it has peaked, but the more mature it gets, the more acidic, which can have a negative effect on the strength of your dough. It can also make the result more tangy.

If what you do today works for you, keep doing it. If you want to try a different procedure to see if it makes a difference, try feeding it and leaving it on the counter. Depending on the ambient temperature and inoculation, it can peak in anything from 3 to 12 hours. The temperature of the water you feed it with also makes a little difference. If you have a big amount of starter and feed it with 200g cold water from the spring, it will take longer to reach ambient temp than if you used water at ambient temp.

Here are some numbers from some tests I did to see how inoculation affected time until peak:

Here's what I fed it (seed:flour:water), inoculation, how long it took to peak and at what ambient temperature.

10:20:20 (50%) in 4 hours at 26C.
5:25:25 (20%) in 5:30 hours at 26C.
2.5:25:25 (10%) in 9 hours at 24-25C.
1.25:25:25 (5%) in 10 hours at 24-25C.
« Last Edit: July 31, 2018, 12:55:39 PM by Heikjo »
-Heine. Mostly Neapolitan sourdough pizzas in an electric Effeuno P134H.

Offline amolapizza

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1207
  • Location: Luxembourg / Spain
  • If pizza is food for the gods, what are we..
Re: Keeping liquid starter in the fridge.
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2018, 02:47:14 PM »
Some additional detail, I feed 1/1/1.

I guess it's like making music, if it sounds good, then it is good :)
Jack

Effeuno P134H (500C), Biscotto Fornace Saputo, Sunmix Sun6, Caputo Pizzeria, Caputo Saccorosso, Mutti Pelati.

Offline barryvabeach

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1469
Re: Keeping liquid starter in the fridge.
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2018, 07:55:34 PM »
First, if you talk to a 1000 bakers who use sourdough, you will get 2000 ways to treat and store starter ( maybe a slight exaggeration)  As Heikjo says, temperature, the amount of inoculation, hydration, and how long before feedings will all play into your final result.  Many manipulate those factors for certain flavor profiles.  For example, I store mine in the fridge for a week between feedings, but since I like a sour tang, I do refreshments at 27 C  ( 82 F ) and use a lower hydration refresh.   If you are happy with the taste and results, keep on doing what you are doing.

Offline amolapizza

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1207
  • Location: Luxembourg / Spain
  • If pizza is food for the gods, what are we..
Re: Keeping liquid starter in the fridge.
« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2018, 07:18:56 AM »
Many thanks for your replies.

I'll keep doing what I've been doing then, so far it seems to work well.
Jack

Effeuno P134H (500C), Biscotto Fornace Saputo, Sunmix Sun6, Caputo Pizzeria, Caputo Saccorosso, Mutti Pelati.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


 

wordpress