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Author Topic: Weight conversion when using different pan  (Read 1191 times)

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Offline norma427

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #40 on: December 18, 2018, 09:48:19 PM »
Norma

Offline norcoscia

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #41 on: December 19, 2018, 08:27:22 AM »
How did it taste? Which flour did you use?
Norm
Baker's Pride GP-61 NG, Baker's Pride M02T 220V, PizzaParty Ardore (with saputo tiles) LP
Focus is NY style but do others too
Preferred Flour (for NY pies) is All Trumps BB
Preferred temperature for NY is 550F, for NP 900+F
Preferred type of yeast IDY

Offline norma427

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #42 on: December 19, 2018, 08:58:38 PM »
How did it taste? Which flour did you use?

Norm,

It tasted okay, but nothing really special.  Steve (Ev) liked it, but the guy across the aisle and I thought the other pan pizzas and regular pizzas are better.  A little bit of a gum line and can't figured out where that came from, because of the parbake.  ???  Used GM Full Strength flour.  Saw last Saturday at Rest. Depot they carry Pillsbury So Strong now.  Was tempted to purchase a bag, but since I can't lift heavy flour bags, didn't want the other person to have to get the extra bag.

Norma

Offline norcoscia

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #43 on: December 20, 2018, 09:38:42 AM »
I was tempted to try one with 3/4 soy and 1/4 very mild EVOO - now, after hearing you did not really like it -  not sure it is worth it - did you put all EVOO in yours?
Norm
Baker's Pride GP-61 NG, Baker's Pride M02T 220V, PizzaParty Ardore (with saputo tiles) LP
Focus is NY style but do others too
Preferred Flour (for NY pies) is All Trumps BB
Preferred temperature for NY is 550F, for NP 900+F
Preferred type of yeast IDY

Offline norma427

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #44 on: December 20, 2018, 06:46:50 PM »
I was tempted to try one with 3/4 soy and 1/4 very mild EVOO - now, after hearing you did not really like it -  not sure it is worth it - did you put all EVOO in yours?

Norm,

Don't think it was the EVOO I didn't like.  Didn't like the partial gum line and not having time to proof the dough. Photo

Norma

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Offline norcoscia

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #45 on: December 20, 2018, 07:17:52 PM »
OK, thanks - I understand now - sorry you did not have enough time to proof it all the way, happy holidays Norma!!!!
Norm
Baker's Pride GP-61 NG, Baker's Pride M02T 220V, PizzaParty Ardore (with saputo tiles) LP
Focus is NY style but do others too
Preferred Flour (for NY pies) is All Trumps BB
Preferred temperature for NY is 550F, for NP 900+F
Preferred type of yeast IDY

Offline norma427

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #46 on: December 20, 2018, 09:15:23 PM »
OK, thanks - I understand now - sorry you did not have enough time to proof it all the way, happy holidays Norma!!!!

Happy Holidays Norm!  No time to proof at all.  Was the end of the night and Steve and I still had dishes/fast clean up to do.   :-D  After standing on my feet for 13 hrs. with no sitting, it sure makes me ready to leave.  Steve felt the same way. 

Norma

Offline norma427

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #47 on: January 01, 2019, 06:26:12 AM »
Posted some of these photos on the “Daily Pie” pie thread.  Few things noted when trying to use the extra frozen dough ball for a round pizza.  Didn't have enough time to let the dough ball warm up enough to see if it would get about the same as in Reply 39 https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=54867.msg557102#msg557102
but the pizza did turn out good, or much better than the pan pizza did.  Dough was really easy to open.  Two things that stumped me are:

Why the dough ball had those tiny specks of darker specks, when the dough really wasn't fermented long (hard to see on the cell phone photo though).   ???

Also wanted to note when mixing the dough in the Kitchen Aid mixer the other week, had a hard time mixing in the olive oil.  Used the flat beater, spiral hook, flat beater and then spiral hook again.  Had the mixer on all kinds of speeds to try and get the olive oil incorporated.  In the end probably mixed about 15 minutes and the olive oil still wasn't incorporated right.  Let the dough rest for little, then balled.  Olive oil seemed incorporated then.  All in all would have thought that the dough was overmixed, but guess that wasn't the case.  ???

Dough didn't fell like 65% hydration either (more than that with olive oil) from Norm's post at Reply 29 https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=54867.msg556793#msg556793

If there is time would like to make a 5 dough ball batch, maybe with fresh cake yeast this coming Sunday at market.


Norma
« Last Edit: January 01, 2019, 06:28:59 AM by norma427 »

Offline norma427

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #48 on: January 01, 2019, 06:35:21 AM »
A few of my customers asked me why I am still experimenting with doughs.  Said that is the way I learn what might be good and what might not be good.

Norma

Offline norma427

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #49 on: January 06, 2019, 07:42:24 PM »
Norm,

When Mike and I were creating the dough calculating tools, we did not have a volume conversion for fresh yeast. That was because we had no way of determining a standard volume measurement for that type of yeast. We surmised that one brand of fresh yeast could have a different weight than another brand for a given volume amount.

However, if Norma plans to use fresh yeast, she might be able to measure a teaspoon, weigh it, and then look for a conversion to IDY or ADY using the table at:

http://www.theartisan.net/convert_yeast_two.htm

Another approach might be to use the converter at:

https://www.traditionaloven.com/culinary-arts/baking/fresh-yeast/convert-tea-spoon-tsp-to-gram-g-of-fresh-yeast.html

However, I do not know how accurate that converter is. I was aware of such a converter when we worked on the dough calculating tools but I wasn't sure how accurate such a tool was likely to be.

Peter

Peter,

This is probably a dumb question, but will ask it anyway.  Never thought how to weigh out fresh yeast.  Tried 3 times to weigh it out by doing something like using Crisco and trying to get it compacted on the teaspoon as much as possible.  That method gave different weights.  Then just tried to crumble one teaspoon and weighed again.  Seems like it fits the second converter you mentioned in your post.  Is just crumbling it the correct way to weigh the fresh yeast?  At least that is the way I did weigh the fresh yeast when using it before.  All of the batches of doughs used fresh yeast today. 

This is a photo (last one) of what the fresh yeast dough and dough balls looked like.  The 65% hydration dough didn't feel like a 65% hydration dough, or a little higher because of the oil.  Not sticky at all.  Also used all Pillsbury So Strong flour today for all of the dough batches.

Norma

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Offline norma427

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #50 on: January 06, 2019, 07:48:51 PM »
Norma

Offline norma427

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #51 on: January 06, 2019, 07:51:13 PM »
Dough sure mixed better after the oil was added in the Hobart than the Kitchen Aid mixer.

Norma
« Last Edit: January 06, 2019, 07:52:52 PM by norma427 »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #52 on: January 07, 2019, 02:04:14 PM »
Peter,

This is probably a dumb question, but will ask it anyway.  Never thought how to weigh out fresh yeast.  Tried 3 times to weigh it out by doing something like using Crisco and trying to get it compacted on the teaspoon as much as possible.  That method gave different weights.  Then just tried to crumble one teaspoon and weighed again.  Seems like it fits the second converter you mentioned in your post.  Is just crumbling it the correct way to weigh the fresh yeast?  At least that is the way I did weigh the fresh yeast when using it before.  All of the batches of doughs used fresh yeast today. 

Norma,

That is a good question but I'm not sure I have a good answer, and it has been years since I last saw the small cubes of fresh yeast sold in the supermarkets around here where I live in Texas to be able to practice weighing it. However, since foodservice companies sell the large blocks or bags to professionals by weight, I would think that you would just cut off a piece and weigh it, without compacting it, although you may be able to crumble it before weighing. From what I have read, one of those little supermarket cubes of fresh yeast weighs about 0.6 ounces (http://www.breadworld.com/product/fresh-active-yeast/). And the instructions mention crumbling the fresh yeast. Remember also that dry yeast is prepared from fresh yeast, I suppose by crushing it and drying it.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #53 on: January 07, 2019, 08:38:22 PM »
Norma,

That is a good question but I'm not sure I have a good answer, and it has been years since I last saw the small cubes of fresh yeast sold in the supermarkets around here where I live in Texas to be able to practice weighing it. However, since foodservice companies sell the large blocks or bags to professionals by weight, I would think that you would just cut off a piece and weigh it, without compacting it, although you may be able to crumble it before weighing. From what I have read, one of those little supermarket cubes of fresh yeast weighs about 0.6 ounces (http://www.breadworld.com/product/fresh-active-yeast/). And the instructions mention crumbling the fresh yeast. Remember also that dry yeast is prepared from fresh yeast, I suppose by crushing it and drying it.

Peter

Peter,

Thanks for your reply.  The Red Star fresh yeast was purchased at the Rest. Depot.  It looks a lot like a pound of butter.  Forgot yesterday how crumbly the fresh cake can be, but also moldable. 

Also forgot that dry yeast is made from fresh yeast.

Norma 

Offline norma427

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #54 on: January 11, 2019, 01:16:56 AM »
Just to report on what happened with the fresh yeast doughs and pizzas this past Tuesday.  All of the doughs were highly fermented/some looked way overblowned.  Didn't think to take photos of the dough balls. If I would not have had the dough mold things probably would not have gone well on opening doughs.  :-D Only used the the fresh yeast at 3 times the amount of IDY usually used and also used cold water out of the deli case for all of the batches.  Usual amount of IDY is 0.16%. Pizzas weren't anything special and got fed up with trying to open those highly fermented doughs.  Checked the fresh yeast when I went to clean market this past Wednesday.  I had taken it out of the plastic wrap and put it in a plastic container so it wouldn't dry out more, after using it this past Sunday.  Saw some condensation on the lid and it appeared wetter than when it was opened.  Wonder if it is good anymore. 

Only interesting things was the pan pizza doughs and how they looked when they were proofing.  Got lots of interesting bubbles in those doughs while proofing.  Never saw those kind of bubbles before.

Norma

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Offline norma427

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #55 on: January 11, 2019, 01:20:09 AM »
Norma

Offline norcoscia

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #56 on: January 11, 2019, 08:20:11 AM »
According to all the PHDs on the web ~3X should have been the right amount - I wonder if the cake yeast kick starts faster and the IDY takes some time to come out of hibernation - did the dough get a lot of time between mixing / balling and the trip to cooler for fermentation. Did you measure cake by weight, if not, that might explain part of the result you had, I think I remember Peter saying something about cake yeasts not all have the same densities. Interesting observations in any case - thanks for letting everyone know and have a good great week!
Norm
Baker's Pride GP-61 NG, Baker's Pride M02T 220V, PizzaParty Ardore (with saputo tiles) LP
Focus is NY style but do others too
Preferred Flour (for NY pies) is All Trumps BB
Preferred temperature for NY is 550F, for NP 900+F
Preferred type of yeast IDY

Offline norma427

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #57 on: January 11, 2019, 09:32:14 AM »
According to all the PHDs on the web ~3X should have been the right amount - I wonder if the cake yeast kick starts faster and the IDY takes some time to come out of hibernation - did the dough get a lot of time between mixing / balling and the trip to cooler for fermentation. Did you measure cake by weight, if not, that might explain part of the result you had, I think I remember Peter saying something about cake yeasts not all have the same densities. Interesting observations in any case - thanks for letting everyone know and have a good great week!

Norm,

That's what I though too about 3X being the right amount.  Not sure, but think my mistake was using cold water with fresh yeast.  Did swish the cake yeast into the cold water before adding the flour, salt and sugar, but am not sure why the doughs rose too much, even before they were warmed up. 

https://redstaryeast.com/yeast-baking-lessons/yeast-types-usage/cake-fresh-yeast/

None of the dough batches made with fresh yeast had any special amount of time between mixing/balling and the trip to the coolers/freezer for fermentation.  Luis helped me with scaling/balling and taking the dough batches out of the mixer.  Was less than 20 minutes for each batch.

The pan dough batch was frozen right after it was mixed, scaled and balled.  The dough balls then were taken out of the freezer Monday afternoon to thaw out to be put in pans after shortly after I arrived at market Tuesday morning.  Some of them were left to warm-up at room temperature, some were left in the deli case and some were put right into the heating cabinet.  I would have thought that some of the yeast would have died off from freezer.  Maybe not enough though to make a big difference.  Use 0.50% in the pans dough.

Yea, am not sure about Peter saying something about fresh yeasts not having all of the same densities.

Thanks about having a great week.  You too!  :)

Norma

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #58 on: January 11, 2019, 09:58:40 AM »
Just to report on what happened with the fresh yeast doughs and pizzas this past Tuesday.  All of the doughs were highly fermented/some looked way overblowned.  Didn't think to take photos of the dough balls. If I would not have had the dough mold things probably would not have gone well on opening doughs.  :-D Only used the the fresh yeast at 3 times the amount of IDY usually used and also used cold water out of the deli case for all of the batches.  Usual amount of IDY is 0.16%. Pizzas weren't anything special and got fed up with trying to open those highly fermented doughs.  Checked the fresh yeast when I went to clean market this past Wednesday.  I had taken it out of the plastic wrap and put it in a plastic container so it wouldn't dry out more, after using it this past Sunday.  Saw some condensation on the lid and it appeared wetter than when it was opened.  Wonder if it is good anymore. 

Only interesting things was the pan pizza doughs and how they looked when they were proofing.  Got lots of interesting bubbles in those doughs while proofing.  Never saw those kind of bubbles before.

Norma

Norma,

I think it is quite possible that you sustained damage to the dough due to glutathione having been released by the yeast when it was subjected to freezing. If you do a search of Tom's posts using "frozen dough glutathione Lehmann" (without the quotes), you will get about 17 hits. Here is a typical post:

Reply 13 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=46616.msg513354;topicseen#msg513354

Also, normally when one wants to convert a regular dough to a frozen version, the normal amount of yeast is increased. It might be around a 50% increase but I have seen examples where the amount of yeast was doubled or even tripled. This suggests that some experimentation and testing may be needed to get the proper amount of yeast.

Peter

Offline norma427

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Re: Weight conversion when using different pan
« Reply #59 on: January 11, 2019, 10:12:11 AM »
Norma,

I think it is quite possible that you sustained damage to the dough due to glutathione having been released by the yeast when it was subjected to freezing. If you do a search of Tom's posts using "frozen dough glutathione Lehmann" (without the quotes), you will get about 17 hits. Here is a typical post:

Reply 13 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=46616.msg513354;topicseen#msg513354

Also, normally when one wants to convert a regular dough to a frozen version, the normal amount of yeast is increased. It might be around a 50% increase but I have seen examples where the amount of yeast was doubled or even tripled. This suggests that some experimentation and testing may be needed to get the proper amount of yeast.

Peter

Peter,

None of the regular dough batches were frozen.  Only the one to make the pan pizzas.  That one worked out well.  The others fermented too much, which were the ones to make round pizzas.

Norma

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