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Author Topic: Grilling Pizza  (Read 5986 times)

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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Grilling Pizza
« Reply #20 on: August 30, 2007, 09:35:25 PM »
Marc,

When you mix dough in a bowl using a spoon, it will be stiff, simply because a spoon is inefficient at mixing. It's possible in your case, since you were using volume measurements, that your 2 1/2 cups of flour were "heavy". For volume measurements of flour, I usually use around 4.5 ounces per cup of flour when I try to convert a recipe to baker's percent format. But I know of some people who use 5.5 ounce cups of flour. If you can tell me how you measure out a cup of flour, maybe I can determine how you got your particular hydration, and possibly its value.

Peter

Offline MarcKenton

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Re: Grilling Pizza
« Reply #21 on: August 31, 2007, 11:42:14 AM »
Peter,

Thanks again for your help with this.  I always weigh ingredients, and I assume 5.0 oz for a cup of flour.  I used 12.5 oz KABF for this recipe.  However, I got lazy with the KA whole wheat flour and measured it out using volume (3Tb). 

By the way, do you know a good conversion rate to use when converting kosher salt to sea salt?  I used kosher salt for this recipe, but I typically prefer to use sea salt.

-Marc

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Grilling Pizza
« Reply #22 on: August 31, 2007, 12:28:42 PM »
Marc,

My practice is to weigh only the major dough ingredients, which are usually the flour and water. I have a special digital scale that can weigh small amounts of lightweight ingredients, but I tend to use volume measurements for those ingredients since the conversion data I use to convert weight to volume comes close to what I would get using the scale. Like you, I would have measured out the whole wheat flour by volume (level tablespoons). If a lot more whole wheat flour were to be used, or if there was a lot more cornmeal, I would weigh them.

For purposes of developing the various dough calculating tools, Boy Hits Car (Mike) and I used the following conversion data for the different forms of salt:

1 teaspoon of Diamond Crystal brand of Kosher salt = 0.1199294 oz.
1 teaspoon of Morton's brand of Kosher salt = 0.1693122 oz.
1 teaspoon table salt = 0.196875 oz.

Because of the many forms and grades of sea salt, we decided to use the same conversion data as for table salt. In practice, I just use (eyeball) a bit less sea salt than the tools indicate.

Peter

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