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Author Topic: Oven temp vs Dough Hydration  (Read 311 times)

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Offline dsherburn

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Oven temp vs Dough Hydration
« on: November 27, 2018, 12:11:32 PM »
How should dough hydration adjust for higher oven temperatures?
I was cooking in the kitchen at 500 F, but my Ooni will go to 900 F.
I'm guessing something in the range of 58% will work for higher temps?
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Offline Minolta Rokkor

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Re: Oven temp vs Dough Hydration
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2018, 01:15:40 PM »
Depends on your tastes and desires. At 550*F I prefer 62% hydration, on steel with a shorter bake, I prefer 58%. Short baked pies are too soft for my tastes

Offline norcoscia

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Re: Oven temp vs Dough Hydration
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2018, 01:31:12 PM »
Be sure not to use the same type of flour at the higher temp - you will want unmated flour and don't add any sugar - the H20 (like MR mentioned) is a matter of preference.
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Offline dsherburn

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Re: Oven temp vs Dough Hydration
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2018, 06:44:20 PM »
Thanks, I'll cook in the 850 degree range and like a thin, more crispy crust

Offline vtsteve

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Re: Oven temp vs Dough Hydration
« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2018, 12:27:58 AM »
Thanks, I'll cook in the 850 degree range and like a thin, more crispy crust

At 850F you're more likely to get a floppy, foldable crust--that's the whole point of the screaming-hot Neapolitan bake. It cooks before it has a *chance* to get crispy.

MR was saying he uses a slightly higher hydration and longer, relatively cool (550F) bake to *avoid* a soft, short-baked crust.
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Offline Bjoern

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Re: Oven temp vs Dough Hydration
« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2018, 04:20:01 PM »
Based on a book that I read recently i also asked myself that question. I doubt meanwhile that there is really such a strong relationship and it maybe purely an opinion of the author. Anyway from the information in that book:

Assuming you cook 58% hydration dough at 485 deg C and 72,5% hydration dough at 250 deg C the relation is the following:

T(Oven) degC = (-16,25)x + 1427,5     

 .... with x as the hydration in %, oven temperature refers here to the stone temperature.

But the cooking is largely influenced not only by heat transfer from the material you cook the pizza on but also by the oven geometry as a result of conduction, convection and radiation.

I mean I have a book that says a 72% dough will be a disaster in a high temperature oven and then I watch a YouTube video of someone cooking a beautiful 80% hydration dough in such a oven  ::)

If you want crisp you need to cook longer as mentioned before , that naturally comes with a temperature reduction but not necessarily with a change of hydration. You need to try it out to find your personal sweet spot

Cheers Bjoern

« Last Edit: November 30, 2018, 04:22:34 PM by Bjoern »

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