A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: So many sourdough info out there, where to begin reliably?  (Read 281 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline mux

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 51
  • I Love Pizza!
So many sourdough info out there, where to begin reliably?
« on: February 10, 2019, 03:50:35 PM »
There's is a ton of random/conflicting/varied information on sourdough. All I want is to try a sourdough  NP style pizza dough. Where should I begin my research to achieve this goal, using a good/high quality guide/information?

Thanks again everybody

Offline Fat_Tony

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 29
  • Location: Canada
  • Phat.. Like the kids say!
Re: So many sourdough info out there, where to begin reliably?
« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2019, 01:39:06 PM »
I would agree with you on the varying info out in the world. My best advice for this is for you to begin your own experiments. Trial and error will be your best method IMO. Right now in my fridge I have 2 different starters that I use and feed weekly varying from making pizza dough to sourdough bread. I keep a kitchen journal and write down the various results I find. I plan on purchasing a few starters online and will also compare them to the ones I currently have.. It just takes time I guess.

There are so many resources on here to try and learn from.. In my experience sometimes you just have to put down the book and take action for yourself. The more you do the faster you will figure out a method that works best for you.

Offline DoouBall

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 176
Re: So many sourdough info out there, where to begin reliably?
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2019, 06:46:25 PM »
My advice, keeping things simple is this.

Buy the Ischia starter online. Get it active using included instructions. Don't try making your own starter - it's very easy for the starter to go bad, very frustrating and may not produce a starter that is good for making pizza in the end. Much better to buy a good starter.

Feed the starter 1:1:1 (starter, flour, water) until it doubles within 6 hours at 70F+ or 12 hours at 63F.
Store in the fridge when not using.
Before making pizza, take out of fridge and feed until it doubles within 6 hours at 70F+ or 12 hours at 63F.

Then you're ready to use pizza.

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,20477.msg202047.html#msg202047

Use TxCraig1's recipe from the Neapolitan thread to learn how to make dough with it. You'll have great results. Good luck!

Offline HansB

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3734
  • Location: Detroit, MI
    • 500px
Re: So many sourdough info out there, where to begin reliably?
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2019, 06:50:18 PM »
I respectfully disagree, making your own starter is dead simple.

Hans

Offline DoouBall

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 176
Re: So many sourdough info out there, where to begin reliably?
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2019, 12:04:47 PM »
It is dead simple, as in, it's "simple" for your starter to become "dead." :)

Yes, it's very easy to make a starter, and its equally easy for it to get contaminated and require starting over, especially in the first 2 weeks. HansB, even your video talks about "how to tell if a starter has gone bad", comparing it to a "sewer". It's a very common occurrence - it happened to me 5 times and I was extremely careful to keep everything sterile and clean.

If you do manage to create a working starter, it's hard to guarantee that your starter will have a good balance and types of yeast/bacteria for pizza. Here in the bay area, homemade starters tend to be very sour, even when using small percentages such as TxCraig1's recipe. They are very different from something like Ischia which is perfect for Neapolitan pizza due to its mild flavor.

Why go through the trouble and waste all that time and energy when you can buy or get some good starter from a local bakery or order Ischia online? You can buy starter for $5 locally or even get some free from a nice baker. That's less than the cost of flour you would need over several weeks of creating a stable new starter.

When someone new to sourdough is asking for advice, I think the best advice we can give is to avoid trying to make their own starter. It makes the whole process 10x harder and may cause people to quit after a few failed attempts, thinking that sourdough is "just too hard". Why not start from a solid high quality starter like Ischia which is perfect for NP, and focus all the learning effort on managing it and making great pizza?
« Last Edit: February 26, 2019, 01:44:02 PM by DoouBall »

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


 

wordpress