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Author Topic: Crunchy Dough  (Read 428 times)

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Offline Roche

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Crunchy Dough
« on: February 16, 2019, 10:37:03 AM »
Hello, I'm starting a new Pizza Shop. It's main business will be delivery and pick up but it will also have like six tables for eating in site. I've done pizza as a hobby for 20+ years mostly trial and error learning from the internet. Like 5 months ago I've been following this Forum daily because in my opinion everyone here is very valuable with all the knowledge and experience they have.
I'm baking at 650F and the stone gets to 600F. My question is that my dough gets very crunchy but when it starts losing temperature it gets a little tough. The recipe of the dough is:

100% APF
60% Water
2.25% Salt
1% Sugar
3% Oil
0.4% IDY

I do CF for 24-72 hours. My dough temperature is between 75-80F when it goes to the fridge. When I open the dough is not very elastic it tends to shrink back a little.

Have a nice day!!

Offline vtsteve

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Re: Crunchy Dough
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2019, 12:51:11 PM »
I'm baking at 650F and the stone gets to 600F.


Where's it getting tough? It looks like cheese is pooling in the middle, so I'd guess thin middle/thick outside, and what looks like a gum line (although it might just be cheese) in the close-up. If you let one cool, then cut with scissors we can see the structure better.

A more even stretch will cook more evenly/prevent over-baking the outside, which will help toughness.
A little more sugar will also make the dough more tender--try a batch with 2%.


Why is the stone running cooler? Does it drop with multiple pies? If the stone is 600F, you're baking at 600F.

What kind of oven are you using?

Is it the same oven you're opening the shop with?

And most importantly, how long is the bake?
In grams we trust.
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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Crunchy Dough
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2019, 04:40:40 PM »
I'm assuming you mean crust and not dough as crunchy dough is wwaayy different from a crunchy crust. You have my curiosity up when you mention differences in stone and oven temperature...this is not common for a commercial oven. As for the handling properties of the dough when you open it, are you allowing the cold dough balls to warm to 50 to 60F (50F is the most commonly used temperature for use in a pizzeria) before you begin opening them into skins?
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Offline Roche

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Re: Crunchy Dough
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2019, 06:59:03 PM »
Thank you for your reply, yes I meant crunchy crust. Sorry about that, English is my second language. Yes, we open the skins when there were about 65F. The oven is a gas oven with stone and in the top inside it has an electric coil like the broiler of a home oven. I don't know if it's necessary to use but the tests we did we only put it on when the pizza goes in and then turn it off. The pizzas are baked from 4 to 5 minutes.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Crunchy Dough
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2019, 09:38:03 PM »
Is there not a heating element on the bottom of the oven too? If your oven only has a top element you might not have a "pizza" oven but instead a "baker's" oven which is significantly different. Also, 4 to 5-minutes baking time in a deck oven is pretty short as most deck oven bake a pizza in the 6 to 7-minute range for a single pizza and then when loaded the time jumps to around the 9 to 11-minute mark.
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Offline jkaye01

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Re: Crunchy Dough
« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2019, 03:35:52 AM »
You have my curiosity up when you mention differences in stone and oven temperature...this is not common for a commercial oven.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor


A little side question on this issue - isn't this the norm? I have the same type of oven (except it's electric, not gas) and indeed there's the knobs you turn with the temperature written on them, one for the top elements and one for the bottom ones (underneath the stone) and the variation in heat is all over the place (even in a new oven). Say, by trial and error, i figured out i have to turn the top heat at 350c and bottom at 380-390c. There's no digital temperature readout as its one of the more basic ovens so i have to use a laser gun to take the temp. And it's in the 325-340 range. Not to mention different parts of the stone or inside walls have different temperature readouts. I thought this is just par for the course. Am i wrong?


My 2 cents for Roche: I had the same issue with my pizzas being dry and crunchy at 300-310c (it took about 7-7:30mins to bake), when i cranked the heat up to 340-350 the bake time went down to 5:30-6mins and the pizzas became softer and a lot nicer. In my mind it makes sense, the longer it stays in the oven, the more dried up (and crunchy) it gets.

Offline Roche

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Re: Crunchy Dough
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2019, 09:50:51 AM »
To answer the Dough Doctor, yes the bottom heating element is gas and the top is the electric coil.

jkaye01 couldn't explain it better, "the variation in heat is all over the place". Thanks for the advice, will try with higher temps and less baking time.

Steve's advice to invrease to 2% sugar I want to try it but I want to ask first because the pizzas in the bottom already comes out with a nice brownish color and I understand that sugar helps with that.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Crunchy Dough
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2019, 06:51:38 PM »
That is correct, you can indeed adjust the crust color of your pizzas by adjusting the amount of sugar used in the dough formulation, sometimes when we have an uncooperative oven we can improve upon the bake a bit by adjusting the sugar level up or down a little. An infrared thermometer is an excellent idea for measuring the deck temperature and setting your oven up don't worry about what the thermostat or whatever says, go by the readout from the IR thermometer.
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